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January 26, 1977 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-01-26

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Wednesday, January 26, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

. r , .____._.-.. 1

TROOP MOVES REPORTED:

Peres
TEL AVIV, Israel (A) - De-
fense Minister Shimon Peres,
reacting to reports of new ad-
vances by Syrian troops into
southern Lebanon, warned yes-
terday that Israel "cannot tol-
erate a threat approaching its
border."
But he added that "the whole
matter is still being examined"
and said the government would
draw no conclusions "before it
has all the facts before it."
The military command said
a unit of the Syrian peacekeep-
ing force in Lebanon moved
Monday into the southern town
of Nabatiyeh, a mostly Moslem
settlement just eight miles
from the tip of Israel's north-
eastern panhandle.
T H E SEMI - OFFICIAL
Israeli state radio, quoting Is-
raeli sources, said the Syrian
force was an infantry battalion
equipped with armored vehic-
les.
Nabatiyeh is believed to lie

warns Syria

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No. 95
Wednesday, January 26, 1977
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 164-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a i ly Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109.. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail butside Ann
Arbor.

Impressions
DUTCH WAX BATIKS
FRENCH COUNTRY PRINTS
NAVAJO HAND SCREEN PRINTS
347 Maynard, Ann Arbor
995-1095

within the "red line" zone of
southern Lebanon beyond which
Israel has said it will not tol-
erate Syrian troops.
The line is generally taken
to mean Lebanon's Litani Riv-
er. But in deciding whether the
"red line" has been violated, the
Israeli government is expected
to consider such factors as the
size and firepower of any unit
entering the area.
THE ISRAELIS have also
warned against a new buildup
of Palestinian forces in the re-
gion, which served as a spring-
boardkforbcross-border guerrilla
attacks before the Lebanese
war. Because Syria supports the
Palestinian cause, Israel fears
a resurgence of guerrilla activ-
ity if the Syrians take control
of southern Lebanon.
Speaking to reporters during
a visit to the Dead Sea, Peres
said Israel would "continue to
insist upon its red line."
Peres reported on the situa-

tion to parliament's foreign af-
fairs and security 'committee,
which usually meets for top-
secret deliberations on military
and diplomatic crises.
A SYRIAN-DOMINATED Arab
League peacekeeping force has
been enforcing a three-month-
old cease-fire in the Lebanese
civil war. It waced problems
in southern Lebanon, however,
because right-wing Christian
and left-wing Moslem forces
have continued sporadic fight-
ing.
Beirut radio said Monday that
Syrian troops were deploying
near Palestinian refugee camps
around Nabatiyeh.
In Washington, President Car-
ter announced he would send
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance
on a six-nation Mideast tour
Feb. 14-21. He said the trip
would underline the importance
"of making significant progress
this year" toward peace in the
area.

U

WHAT IS THE
ACCELERATED PROGRAM
IN PUBLIC POLICY ?
Interested undergraduates are invited to attend
a meeting about the accelerated program of-
fered at The Institute of Public Policy Studies.
Qualified applicants are able to complete both
a bachelor's degree and the two-year M.P.P. in
five years of study.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26th
at 12 noon in the
MODERN LANGUAGES BUILDING,
room B 134

Daily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
Rick Ashcroft stands near the frame of one of two concrete canoes in the process of construction
for a race in early spring. This canoe is about half finished. Wire mesh goes over the frame,
then the cement is spread.

Flight class en

HOW DO THEY FLOAT?
Cement canoe
By ELAINE ELSON
Building and racing concrete canoes seems
an unlikely hobby, but students from the Quar-
terdeck Society - an honorary society of the
Naval Architecture School - and the American 1
Society of Civil Engineers' student chapter,
(ASCE), are hunting for a trailer to transport
their concrete crafts to early spring races.
"We do it for fun and to gain practical ex-
perience in designing," says Stuart Cohen,
chairman of Quarterdeck's Concrete C a n o e
Committee. "We design the canoes to float and
paddle easily."
COHEN, a Naval Architecture major and
graduating senior, explains why the concrete
canoes don't sink.
"It's Archimedes' Principle," he said. "If
the object displaces more water than it weighs,
then it will float. Water is 62.4 lbs. per cubic
foot. So if something is one foot on a side and
weight 60 lbs., it doesn't matter what it is
made out of - feathers, steel, pressed saw-
dust. If it holds together, it will float."
The American Concrete Institute (ACI), has
sanctioned these annual races for six years and
will do so again for this year's late April to
early May race. -

NEW YORK (P) - Thirty-
sdesigned to conquer the fear of
Approximately 22 students started planning flying, which many of them
the anoe in ovemer,'and building began feel is a fear of dying, took a
the canoes i November, d 406 - mile plane ride Tuesday-
three weeks ago. but not until they had signed
The Canoe Committee has almost completed releases in case the plane
two of the three stages necessary before the crashed.I
race. The stages are: the design of the canoes: Only four in the Pan Am
the actual construction of the canoes, and get- "Fearful Flyers" class had
ting the paddlers conditioned for the race. never flown before; the rest
COHEN says the racing canoes will be finish- had stopped for a variety of
ed by semester break. reasons, but generally because
"We're about a third done with the entire of bad experiences in the air.
projet,"We'r e ns,"d about halhfrd done wthAfter five lecture sessions
project," Cohen says, "and about half done and a half-hour runway taxi
with the first canoe. Already we've made the demonstration to help overcome
basic supporting structure and the frames over their fears, graduates were
which we put the battens. A wire mesh is put required to sign a statement ac-
on the battens and over this we spread the con- knowledging the airline was not
crete." "liable under any circum-
The concrete will take about a week to hard- stances, weather, negligence, or
en anrmetht t imtakeotheadlertwird-otherwise, for loss or expense,
en, and from that time on the paddlers w~'ill for any delay or failure to com-
have a month to practice with their canoes. plete passage, for death or in-
"If it's warm out," says Cohen, "We'll prac- jury . .
tice in the Huron river." AND ONCE seated on the 707
jet, passengers were able to
THE RACERS plan on being in great physical browse through a booklet en-
h f the race Larrv Shute from A.S.C.E. titled "Just In Case . ."

The ride from John F. Ken-
nedy Airport down the Jersey
coast, over Harrisburg, Pa. and
back was free; and many grad-
uates took along their spouse
for comfort. The course cost
$100.
"It was great. I can't believe
it was so easy," said Dr. Har-
vey Lazofson, a general practi-
tioner from Philadelphia,.as the
first of some 90 half-pints of
champagne were handed out.
"FIRST IT WAS the fear of
dying. But once you learn the
plane can fly, then it's just the
fear of personal panic," Lazof-
son said.
After signing the release, the
passengers were given a pep
talk by their professor, Capt.
W. T. "Slim" Cummings, a vet-
eran pilot and former psycholo-
gist.
Cummings, who during the
past two years has held similar
graduations for 700 persons in
Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, De-
troit, Philadelphia, Houston and
Miami, estimates the fear of
air travel affects about 25 mil-

7

ds fear
lion Americans, including those
who have a phobia and fly re-
luctantly.
THROUGHOUT the
flight, Cummings, who was not
the pilot, walked the aisle com-
forting the anxions
Susan Goldberg, 27, of New
York, flies 'twice a month, but
hates every minute of it. "It's
getting worse as I get older,"
she said prior to the gradua-
tion journey.
She told of plans to fly to
Florida later in the day, but'
once back on land.she wasn't
so sure. "I hope I can make it
later. This is different. We're
all in this together. Nobody
will be with me later.
"All it is is a fear of dying.
I hate it. I'm always so ner-
vouse," Miss Goldberg said.
"I've even drawn blood from
strangers sitting next to me."

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
presents
CONTEMPORARY COMEDY
January '26 - 30,1977
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Box Office Opens Daily 10 am.
763-1085

snape irit ~. i i y .~I .I n .o. u.
emphasizes, "We're going to' go in and win that
race. We're going to have a bunch of Amazons
going there."

r ... .. .. ..r......" ....................... ..... .....r: i$:i:=C?..........
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
.=.== = ..= == == r ..

Fall
1911-

COURSE MART'
DEADLINES

Winter
1918

Wednesday, January 26, 1977
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM: Panel discussion, "India:
Current Economic and Political Di-
mensions," guest, Philips Talbot,
Pres. Asian Society. Ernest Stern,
VP South Asia World Bank, and
Myron Weiner, Prof. Massachusetts
Institute Technology; moderator
Pauline Frederick NPR, 10 -a.m.
Ind./Op. Eng.: Salvator T. March,
U of Minn., "The Determination of
Efficient Record Segmentations and
Blocking Factors for Shared Data
Files," 2P9 W.E., 4 p.m.
Statistics: Waldo Tobler, "Some
Statistical Problems in Geography,"
3227 Angell, 4 p.m.
Physics/Astronomy: W. Caswell,
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center,
"The Decay Rate of Positronium and
Bound State Methods," P & A Col-

loquium, 4 p.m.
Biological Sciences: James A. Tee-
ri, U. of Chicago, "Phenotypic Varia-
tion of Potentilla Glandulosa of En-
vironmental Variability," 2111 Nat.
Sci., 4 p.m.
CEW: The Exam Taking Process,
B 115 Mod. Lang. Bldg., 7:30 p.m
Music School/Multi Ethnic Alli-
ance: Alna Brychova, Stefan M. Eh-
renkreutz, "Songs of Many Lands,"
Lec. Hall, Rackham, 8 p.m.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB - 763-4117
Red Cedar Recreation Assoc., wil-
liamston, MI. Opening for evperi-
enced Recreation Programmer, work
can go into fall as part-time job.
Good salary. Further details avail-
able.
University Hospital, Cleveland,
Ohio. Cleveland resident. Openings

for Juniors as nursing aids, 40-hour
week, good salary. Details available.
Iroquois Research Institute, Vir-
ginia. Unusual summer opportunity
for students with BA, MA or PhD
degrees in geology, archolog., biology,
Soil Sciences and .other fields. De-
tails available.
DR. PAUL C. USLAN
OPTOMETRIST
Eye Examinations
Full Contact Lens Service
Cold Sterlization for
Soft Lenses
545 CHURCH ST.
769-1222

For consideration as 1977-78 offerings, Course
Mart proposals for Fall 1977 AND Winter 1978
must be completed and submitted by the dead-
line: FEBRUARY 2, 1977.
To: COURSE MART COMMITTEE
2501 LS&A Bldg.
764-6464
(Info and applications available now)

neteneralton?
submission dcodImna fabruox4)I7
-

x

I

JOIN THE DAILY STAFF

4pp.

Y ./ .,, ....,..

...
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Contact your placement office for an interview with
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GLOBAL AWARENESS
SERIES
WEEKLY: Wed. 4 p.m. Thurs. NOON
LECTURE LUNCH/DISCUSSION
Angell Hall Aud. "A" Lord of Light Luth. (Hill & Forest)
Jan. 26-4 p.m. Fr. James Sinnott-U.S. FOREIGN POLICY AND
Jan. 27--noon THE REPUBLIC OF KOREA. Mary Knoll Missionary
expelled from S. Korea in 1975, now active in giv-
ing testimony to U.S. Congress and citizens.
Feb. 2-4 p.m. Prof. Henry Bucher-CHURCH AND APARTHEID:
Feb. 3--noon HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE. Prof. has a PhD in
African Studies from U. of Wisc. and is currently
working in their African Studies Program. He has
lived in Africa.
Feb. 9-4 p.m. The Rev. Frisco Gilchrist-THE U.S. IN LATIN
AMERICA. He served in Paraguay since 1952 at
Feb. 10-noon Colegia International, the Disciples of Christ edu-
cation program and most recently with Friendship
Mission working with peasant/Indian communities.
The current intervention of the government re-
sulted in his arrett and expulsion.
Feb. 16-4 p.m. Leon Howell-U.S. FOREIGN POLICY. Leon is
Feb. 17-noon Ass't. Editor of "Christianity and Crisis" and has
written for "For East Economic Review." Author:

I-

HOMEWORK NOT
KEEPING YOU
BUSY ENOUGH?
It's still not too late to come down to the
Daily and help us out. The Business De-
partment NEEDS PEOPLE who want to:
" work preparing ads and learning the
operations of a daily paper
" meet other good, frustrated people
* party down once in a while
" drink 5c Cokes
" after the first month, make a LITTLE bit

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