100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 25, 1977 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY .

Tuesday, January 25, 1977

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

Residents balk at
meal consolidation

Campus mail c

(Continued from Page 1)
solidation," said freshman Jona-
than Prasse. "They've been
talking about it for years."
THE SURVEY outlines the
benefits and problems of such
a plan, and asks the resident
to indicate support or opposi-
tion.
The major benefit, according
to the survey:
- Consolidation of food ser-
vice is one of the most effec-
tive ways to cut dorm rents.
The problems:
- Residents, of Mosher-Jor-
dan, West Quad, and Alice
Lloyd will have to walk to neigh-
boring dorms for the weekend
meals, and lines will swell in
the host dorms.
- Dining rooms in Lloyd, Cou-
zens, and South Quad will be
closed to other weekend activi-
ties.
- The plan could dilute com-
munity feeling in dorms and
"contribute to an atmosphere
of institutionalism and deper-
sonalization."
"BEING RELAXED and eat-

ing in your own dorm is an
important part of our life here,"
said Randi Abramson, an Alice
Lloyd representative on the poli-
cy committee who disagreed
with the recommendation. "Peo-
ple are willing to pay to eat
in their own dorm."
The attempt to disrupt, the
Couzensadinner was generally
successful. Most of the Couzens
residents wished the intruders
would "go away."
BUT MOST OF THE Couzens
residents bucked the horde of
diners, who munched elbow to
elbow as the garbled, pumped-
in radio added to the general
melee.
Among them was Margot Mor-
row, director of Alice Lloyd and
the Pilot Program, which calls
Lloyd home. Morrow said the
change would be "disastrous
for our unity. We are a living
and learning center. We interact
around the table; students can
talk to their teachers." Eighteen
Pilot teaching assistants live in
Lloyd and act as resident advi-
sors.

By DAVE HYDE
One morning two weeks ago,
Ann Arbor woke up and found
itself buried beneath a foot of
snow. And while cars were
made captivehto theirawalled-in
parking spaces and University
professors decided the morning
pilgrimage to class was too
treacherous to risk, the Univer-
sity Mail Service trucks hit the
roads fearlessly.
Despite the crippling weather
conditions, the University re-
mained open and so spewed it's
roughly 22,000 pieces of campus
mail into assorted collection
boxes. The two University Mail
trucks, one servicing " North
Campus and the other covering
Central Campus, did the rest.
THE CAMPUS mail operation
is a unique one. A truck will pull
up to a building, make. its de-
livery of campus mail, and head
for the next stop, while a three-
man crew sorts the mail picked
up, en route.
"We are unique with this sys-
tem across the country for de-
livery of campus mail," says
Doug Barnett, manager of the
University Mail Service.

"Most will pick up at a lo-
cation and bring it- back to sort
it," he said. "This system (the
University's) was put in back
in 1960 and we wouldn't go
back."
THE CAMPUS mail network is
comprised of some 225 stops,
some of which are tapped twice
a day by the trucks.
"The major schools get deliv-
ery at least two times a day.
The smaller units get at least
one per day except for a small
number (15) of scattered stops
which get delivery three times
a week," explained Barnett.
"We shouldn't have a letter in
our system more than 24 hours,"
said Barnett, though he admit-
ted sometimes the service can
get snagged.
THERE are bound to be some'
problems in processing such a
bulk of mail. In sorting, some-
times a letter ends up in the
wrong bin, a mistake easily
made considering the similarity
in some of the acronymed ad-
dresses like SAB and SEB.
Nonetheless, Barnett is "pretty
proud of the record."

omes through
The University Mail Service is l ing people how to address and
intimately linked to the Ann Ar- send their mail to insure the
bor Post Office especially be- most efficient service. A sem-
cause the school is the local post inar is given along these lines
office's largest single customer. three times a year and anyone
d~nt"

Barnett mused that you can't;
just go down to the corner mailj
box and pack it full with Uni-
versity mail collected that day.
The University has to personally
deliver its mail, already soited,
to the post office.
And every day, the post office
carts the mail to the University
.but not the parcels. It is the job
of the University Mail Service
to pick up packages at the post.
office and deliver them to the
appropriate departments. Two
trucks are employed for this
purpose alone.
THE COMBINED cost of U.S.
mail, parcel post and U.P.S.
service came to $1.65 million for
the Dearborn, Flint and Ann Ar-
bor campuses last year.
In University c a t a 1 o g u e s
alone, 18 tons of information
passed through the postal sys-
tern last year.
The Mail Service serves an-
other important function in the
University community by teach-

-an attenu.
"'OUR BIGGEST protlem,"'
said Barnett, "is' that people
don't identify how they want
mail sent." He cited an example
where one package destined to
travel overseas, contained a let-
ter and as such would have cost
$18 in postage, The Mail Service
suggested the letter be removed
from the package, allowing the
parcel to be sent for $8 instead,
according to a different rate.
category.
The campus delivery system
developed around 1912-1915. "It
began with one carrier who de-
livered campus mail. He died
in 1960 and he carried the mail
for the University for 48 years,"
Barnett recalled.
In 1960, the current en route
sorting system was born and by
1964 a second truck was added
to the one truck fleet instituted
in 1948.
The Mail Service presently op-
erates out of 1032 Greene, its
new home since last April.

Council considers
city parking plan'
(Continued from Page 1) town, we will create a slump
supported the proposed assess- which we may not be able to
ment as well as those advocat- reverse," Councilperson Robert
ing the increased parking rates Henry (R-3rd Ward) said.
expressed concern with the ef- However, Wheeler pointed out
fect a parking rate hike would that many downtown merchants
have on th, downtown business currently validate customers
area. parking fees and "if you make
SEVERAL COUNCIL members the fee higher more customers
voiced fears that an increased will have their paring stubs
parking fee would cause shop-
pers to patronize shopping areas WHEELER CALLED on Plan-
with free parking on the out- ning Director Martin OvPrhiser,
skirts of the city rather than who quoted a recent study show
the metered downtown area. ;4.

t
r

"If we raise rates and cause
people to stop coming down-
NEW YORK (UPI)-Employee
stock ownership plans created
under the new tax exemption
plan and designed to broaden
stock ownership, are having one
unexpected result.
They are becoming a means
of selling a business quickly to
desirable new owners.
The trend seems clear, al-
though seems clear, although
only a few such sales have been
reported so far.

ing a ten per cent increase in
downtown area usage within the
next 1S years which would re-
quire an additional 2,000 park-
ing spaces.
"Five cents won't make it
(downtown) die," member Earl
Greene (D-2nd Ward).said. "In
the long run it will be a five-
year legal fight to see who pays
1(for the parking improvements)
at all.
Councilperson Jamie Kenwor-
thy (D-4th Wgrd) added that if
parking rates are raised this
year he believes they will have
to be increased again in two
years.

Kr
LDIES'
BODY
SONS TABLES SHIRTS
6"x 16" size. Available in Long sleeve styles in assortedw
Yellow or Block. Easy to prints with button front and
le. collar. Available in sizes S-M-
REG. $4.47 1
re t n Lda' Snr- -- -r on

±'iI Ie

£

T

61t

PRICES GOOD THRU SATURDAY JANUARY 29, 1977. MEIJER RESERVES THE RIGHT TO
LIMIT SALES ACCORDING TO SPECIFIED LIMITS. NO SALES TO DEALERS, IN-
STITUTIONS OR DISTRIBUTORS.

Mondale confers
with NATO allies
(Continued from Page 1) rifle-carrying German soldiers
Meanwhile, in Washington yes- who marched up to planeside
terday, a Senate report was" re- and presei}ted arms when Mon-
leased saying NATO's armed dale emerged from Air Force
forces are in such disarray and Two.
poor condition that they might
not be able to withstand an at- "I AM delighted to be in
tack by the Warsaw Pack na- Bonn just a few hours after, the
tions of Eastern Europe. Carter administration, has as-
On the way to the Brussels sumed power, in order to . . .
airport, Mondale made an un- immediately begin cooperative
scheduled stop at the U.S. Em- high-level discussions between
bassy to report to Carter via a the leaders of your great coun-
telephone line made secure by a try and ours," Mondale said in
so-called "scrambler." an arrival statement.
Energy, economic problems,
MONDALE told reporters Car- East-West relations and the At-
ter said the device made the lantic alliance will be on the/
vice president "sound like Don agenda for'his talks on Tuesday
ald Duck." with Chancellor Helmut
"'I said, 'I am Donald Duck'," Schmidt, Mondale said4
Mondale recounted. Tomorrow he will visit West
The vice-president then flew Berlin "to demonstrate our com-
to the West German capital, mitment to the security and in-
where he was greeted by For- dependence" of the city, located
eign Minister Han-Dietrich Gen- 110 miles inside Communist
scher and an 18-man squad of East Germany.

PLUMBING & HEATING
REPAIR BOOK
Detailed instructions and.
illustrations on how to install
various plumbing systems.
Pm De
Plumbing Dept.

1-STOP SHOPPING SAVES MONEY, TIME, ENERGY

TOPCO
FRUIT
FRAGRANCE
SHAMPOO
AND o
CREME
RINSE
* New improved formulas
* 16 fl. oz.
REG. 88
77BeAD
Health i Beauty Aid: Dept.

PAR
16"x 1
White,
ossemb

C

HMane an

nvusewures ePT

waEes ')porTswear uepT

FULLY CURED - VERY LEAN (WATER ADDED BY MANUFACTURER)
OL VIRGINIA BoNELESS
WH$11

0

GENUINE U.S. NO.1{ IDAO BAKING

J.7
r

%. .."11
t".'n,
r 3 "
Ai
PPfN jwz;
1r ' ys a..<
A IT Mr i
RTN 0f
'Aft
!r r ti 5FN
R
Dad r a:

POTAT01
GOLD MEDAL
VOS~
CREAMY OR CRUNCH
A }AVE2
-.od le LARGE OR,
24oz.
.rt ," yssoT t/A ME J

i i dw . doom Ammh

Es

10 1b. bag

SAVE 20°
5 lb. bag
55
V PEANUT BUTTER2
5+°28 oz. wt. jar

$109

DIETZEL"S SHOE SALE
LAST FOUR DAYS OF SALE
EVERYTHING MUST GO
Sale Ends Sat., Jan. 29. Doors Open Wed., 9 am.
Everything Out For Your Own Self-Service
CLOSE OUT SPECIALS ON ALL
WOMEN'S FALL DRESS SHOES
Left from Jan. Sale
Val. 17.00 to 30.00 NOW 65
All Air Step, ONLY
Life-Stride,
Miss America

I

SMALL CURD SAVE 351
;. carton
CHEESE 6'

-OTHER SPECIALS-

WOMEN'S
SHOE BOOTS
Vol. 18.99 *o 45.00
NOW
962 to 1442

CHILDREN SHOES
Leather School Type
Vol. to 1 6.50
Now :385

0rn ORE IDA
MEIJER REGULAR
OR CRINKLE CUT
F RIES
5 lb pkg.
Lassc

Don't Miss Our $1.92 Rack of Shoes

30,
COUPON

u MRI'S couroN
SALAD DRESSING
32 A. sa. jar (qt.)

MEUER FAMILY SIZE slit
SOAP
GOLD DIAL
7 oz. wt bar

m~iJE Wifi 0E0- couo
O0RANT
MINI PADS
24 nt b

CLOSE OUT SPECIALS ON ALL
MEN'S FALL DISCOUNTED SHOES
ROBLEE . . . NOW 115
VAL TO 43 00
PEDWIN . ..NOW 865

MMm-

AA&

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan