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January 25, 1977 - Image 5

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Michigan Daily, 1977-01-25

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Arts & THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Ars& Entertainmn Tuesday, January 25, 1977 Page. Five

PTP show drags
By STEPHEN PICKOVER farmance was not present for most of the
show. The problems seemed to stem from
ALONDON FOG rolled into Power Cen- the actors' inability to play to each other
ter Saturday night, and though a few with consistency. For example, in the first
audience members got asphyxiated, it might act, Christopher Wynkoop (James Larrabee)z
have been a better evening had it never seemed to be taking the role seriously while
lifted. But it did, eventually, and what was Kathleen Gaffney (Madge Larrabee), who
revealed was an inconsistent and tedious played his wife, acted comically. The com-
production of Sherlock Holmes. bination, rather than being complementary,
The original Sherlock Holmes was writ- seemed to lack interaction. Gaffney couldr
j ten by Conan Doyle in 1871, but he was have played off Wynkoop, which would have
unable to get it accepted for production. It added some comedy to an act that dragged.r
then fell into the hands of William Gillette, The technical problems were a bit too
an actor of the time who rewrote it. horrendous to leave untouched. As the fog
Thoroughly engrossed by the character of machine continued to spew its lightly scented<
Holmes, yet wary as to how much poetic dust, which made all of Power Center look
license was in his possession, Gillette wrote like one of the opium dens Holmes used
to Conan Doyle, "May I marry Holmes?" to frequent, I must admit it might have
Conan Doyle's reply: "Marry him or mur- been amusing for a few sadists to watchs
der him or do anything else you like with a capacity crowd fanning its programs, try-
him." And so the show opened in Buffalo, ing to keep from being engulfed by the
New York on October 23, 1899, and after billowy mass. The unimaginative lighting
two weeks, had a successful run on Broad- did nothing to aid the performance, al
way at the Garrick Theater. though it did cut through the smog.
The play is a Victorian melodrama, and
therefore, for today's audience, it is neces- . As for Michalski's Holmes, he did a good
sary to present it as a commentary on its job of portraying the cool yet highly-strung
ridiculous soap-opera-like quality. When this detective, and though his superiority com-
interpretation was followed, and it was in plex was humorous, perhaps a bit of under-
some scenes, the actors were in their best playing would have brought out the points
form.ne uch scene as the evetfl meet even better. He was articulate and had good
tform. One such scene was the eventful meet- saepeec.
ing of Holmes and Professor Moriarty (Kurt stage presence.
Kaszner), at Holmes' suite on Baker street. Professor Moriarty, or Kaszner in dis-
' Here, the timing was perfect, as each genius guise, was deliciously evil, though thins came
tries to out-guess the other, with Holmes out more from his eyes and facial ges-
finally getting the upper hand in the end. tures than from vocal expression. What we
Michalski and Kasner both wore child-like saw was a distinguished Snideley Whip-
expressions, the former with the "I beat you lash who sulks when he doesn't get hisr
ha ha" triumphant grin, and the latter with way, and glitters when a tour de force is'
tearful resignation and the knowledge that accomplished.
he will one day get revenge.
In short - elementary, folks. Very ele-,
UNFORTUNATELY, this caliber of per- mentary.
:.:: :*: :.::..:." ...:^: .. . . . . ?...:.:::... .. . . .. . :: t{:;w::

CONCERT FEATURES OLD

& NEW SONGS:

Jethro
By KEITH TOSOLT
THE MINSTREL was Ian An-
derson, showman extraordin-
aire, and the gallery was De-
troit's Masonic Auditorium as
Jethro Tull performed two
shows last Wednesday and
Thursday.
Anderson, sporting hair and
beard shorter than in years
past, walked into the spotlight
with his guitar to sing "Wonder-
ing Aloud." He was dressed in
a vest and bowler, which he
tapped against his head in a
very vaudevillian manner. Ian
was his old self throughout the
night, using his flute as a prop
and prancing about wildly.
Anderson was joined by thea
rest of the group for "Skatingj
Away." Jethro Tull consists of
Martin Barre, lead guitar; John
Evans, piano and organ; Barri-
more Barlow, percassion; and
new additions John Glascock,
bass and David Palmer, synthe-
sizer and organ.
THE BAND previewed four
selections from their newest al-
bum, as yet untitled. Anderson
has turned to old English heri-
tage and music for inspiration.
"Jack in the Green," for in-
stance, was a melodic tune,
about a mythical character.
"Song From The Woods," de-.
scribed as a "celebration of mu-
sic" by Anderson, employs
unique old English harmoniesi
in its vocals. It started out very
light and turned into heavy met-
al as Barre unleashed his gui-
tar.
A kilted Barlow pulled on a
medieval drum kit for "Velvet
Green," a very strange and
ancient sounding composition.
"Hunting Girl" was a mediocre
tale of a young lass who likesG
to use her riding crop.j

Tull: Exciting

THE NEVER SONGS were in-
terspersed among the Tull fa-
vorites. They played "Thick as
a Brick" which Anderson said
critics have called "their stand-
by." Jethro Tull is a very tight
stage band, a quality acquired
through intense rehearsal. The
rendition of "Thick as a Brick"
really showed the expert inter-
play among the musicians dur-
ing an instrumental.
A medley of older hits was
very well structured. It start-
ed with "To Cry You a Song"
and "New Day Yesterday." At
that point, Anderson played a
flute solo incorporating the holi-
day tune "Comfort and Joy,"
"Bouree" and a display of gasp-
ing intonation. The others then
played an instrumental version
of "Living in the Past" and
brought the medley full circle
with a return to "New Day Yes-
terday."
An instrumental lead-in to
"Minstrel in the Gallery" fea-
tured a riff stolen from the sec-
ond movement of Beethoven's
Ninth Symphony. They also
played "Too Old to Rock and
Roll" with Palmer supplying a

marvelous fifties sax solo.
"AQUALUNG," Tull's first
concert album as well as their
most successful, comprised the
remainder of the show. They
played the title track and
"Cross-eyed Mary" before leav-
ing the stage.
Martin Barre, an expert but
under-rated guitarist, returned
alone for a solo. He began with
a bit of classical Bach, but it
didn't get any reaction from
Detroit's rock orientated crowd.
So he turned on his power boost
and cranked out some very fluid
high energy licks using speedy
triplets and the heavy metal
sound of feedback.
For encores, the band played
"Wind Up" and "Locomotive
Breath." At the end Anderson
was left alone to serenade the
audience goodby with "Back
Door Angels," as the spotlight
closed in on his face. "See you
at your place," he said, tipped
his hat and the madman dashed
offstage, leaving the audience
content after nearly two and a
half hours of excellent Jethro
Tull.

4
Welcome back to another semester of FLASH-our
colunn of news from the music business which appears
every Tuesday here in the Daily prepared by Jim
Duprey of the Major Events Office.
None of the acts are touring this semester that we
figured you would most like to see performing. here:
Steve Miller, Boz Scaggs, Fleetwood Mac, Frampton are
all waiting for warmer weather. The Beach Boys would
have played Crisler last weekend but the arena was
booked solid with athletic events on the night needed.
Richard Pryor is so busy with his film career there are
no plans for any live concert dates, and Stevie Won-
der's manager told us last week that he is Europe
bound. We'll be holding our annual chat with any sfu-
dents intertested in understanding all the factors that
affect which acts appear here . . . the meeting will
be this Thursday, January 27 at 4:00 p.m. in the
Kuenzel Room of the Michigan Union.
COMING: Jeff Beck with Jan Hammer and Journey
concert coming to Crisler on February 27. Tickets go
on sale next Monday, January 31 at 11:30 a.m. at our
box office in the Michigan Union Lobby. Watch DAILY
ads this week for full details.
GONE: After delighting 13,000 U of M fans last No-
vember, THE EAGLES went on to sellout all 28 concerts
on the tour playing to over 400,000 people.
The elite-of Southern Rock converged upon Nashville
January 8 for the 3rd Annual Volunteer Jam. The
Charlie Daniels Band played host to the likes of Willie
Nelson, The Outlaws, Marshall Tucker, and Papa John
Creach. With all that Southern food, bourbon, and
Confederate flags, it looks like the South gonna' rise
again.,
PASSING THROUGH: Barbra Streisand is considering
a multi-LP of her whole life (how about "Flatbush City
Limits"?) . . . lead singer of the Spinners, Philippe
Wyne has embarked on a solo career.. . . within a
few months all record companies will raise the price of
albums $1.00 . . . Isaac Hayes went bankrupt .
Bob Seger's 4 sold out nights at Cobo 2 weeks ago
left no doubt that the nicest guy in rock 'n roll has
everything together this time around and Michigan's
little secret is out all over the country with the music
industry buzzing about this man.
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING QUICK RESULTS

Black festival held

Join The Doily
Arts Deportment!

By PAULINE TOOLE
'THE MINORITY GROUP Ab-
eng sponsored the fourth an-
nual Black Arts and Culture
Festival in East Quad this past
weekend. The festival was held
as a prelude to the National
Black History Week which is
in the beginning of February.
The Abeng was a horn used
in Africa to call a tribe to-
gether for an event. The festi-
val was intended to be symbol-
ic of the Abeng's purpose - pro-
viding the opportunity for peo-
ple to come together and ex-
perience cultural events.
Marina Shoemaker, one of the
organizers of the events des crib-I
ed the intentions of the festival.
"We wanted to bring together
old and new artists and art-
forms and give incentive to new
artists in the community," she
said.
ALL OF TIE artists partici-,
pating in the festival were from
the greater Ann Arbor area.I
The weekend mixed a variety
of social and cultural events,
thereby providing the opportu-
nity both to participate in and
to observe different artforms.
Some of the events geared to-
ward participation included a
talent contest and a poetry
reading.
One of the most enjoyable
events of the weekend was the
jazz quintet led by Bernard,
James. Blending sharp percus-
sion sounds and the wail of reed.
instruments, the end product

tugged at the imagination of
the audience.
ANOTHER HIGHLIGHT was!
the gospel choirs concert. Sing-
ing a variety of spirituals, the
voices blended soothingly. The
songs and tones conveyed a
range of emotions' including 1
pain, joy, despair tnd sorrow.
"The weekend is designed to!
pull together the strengths ofE
the community and to help the
community to know each oth-
ers interests," according to Dar-
nell Carr, one of the organiz-
ers.
The festival was successful in
this aim. A number of skilled
artistsdemonstrated their tal-
ents and attempted to encour-'
age expression by other poten-
tial artists.

HOWARD HAWKS 1932
SCARFACE
Screenwriter Ben Hecht and Hawks create a
genre with this powerful gangster film based on
the career of Al Capone. Paul Muni stars and
George Raft and Boris Karloff are great in their
supporting :oles.
WED.: PRETTY POISON and
PLAY IT AS IT LAYS
CINEMA0GUILD 0 & 9:05 AdmiRCo $1.25

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
presents
CONTEMPORARY COMEDY
January 26 -30,1977
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Box Office Opens Daily 10 a.m.
. 763-1085

HAPPENINGS
763-1107
PARASPYCHOLOGY SEMINAR
Jan. 31-Feb. 2
Two UCLA parapsychologists, Dr. Barry Taff and Mr.
Kerry Gaynor, will be conducting lectures, ESP demon-
strations and discussion on the supernatural; ghosts,
hauntings, poltergeists and ESP.
Mon., January 31, 9:30 p.m.-Msher-Jordan Hall-
informal discussion and ESP demonstration
Tues., February 1, 7:30 p.m.-Rackham Auditorium-
Formal lecture with unusual slides and tape record-
ings being presented
10:00 p.m.-Informal discussion in Alice Lloyd Hall
Wed., February 2, 7:00 p.m.-East Quad-ESP dem-
onstration
9:00 p.m.-Alice Lloyd Hall-ESP demonstration
ALL EVENTS ARE FREE
co-sponsored by: UAC, LSA govt., MSA, Pilot Program,
Engr. Council, East Quad, Alice Lloyd, Mosher-Jordan
Hall
ROBERT ALTMAN FILM FESTIVAL
Presents ..
M* A*S*'H, Wednesday, Jan. 26th
7:00 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall and .. .
BREWSTER McCLOUD, Wednesday, Jan. 26th
9:00 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall
Season tickets for films, which include the major sneak
preview by Alan Rudolph, will be available until 26
January. $12.00
Season tickets for the lectures, which include Elliott
Gould, Molly Haskell, Andrew Sarris, Joan Tewkesbury,
Tommy Thompson; Elaine Bradish, and ROBERT ALT-
MAN are still available. $10.00
MEDIATRICS Presents ...
Fri., Jan. 28-THE LONGEST YARD at 7:30 p.m. and
9:45 p.m.
Sat., Jan. 29th-SLEUTH at 7:00 p.m. and 9:45 p.m.
Admission: $1.25. Both shows af the Nat. Sci. Audi-
torium
ECLIPSE JAZZ Presents..-.
CHARLES MINGUS in concert February 4 & 5 at the
Michigan Union Ballroom-Two shows each night: 8:00
& 11:00 p.m.
FREE WORKSHOP Saturday, Feb. 5, at 5:00 p.m. at the
Union Ballroom.
Tickets are $3.50, available at the Michigan Union Box
Office, Schoolkid's Records, D i s c o u n t Records and
Wherehouse Records in Ypsilanti.
UAC TRAVEL Presents ...
SPRING BREAK TRIPS! Hawaii, Cancun, Acapulc and
Jamaica. Includes Air Transportation and Hotel Accom-
Also, flights to New York, Boston; Newark, Philadelphia
l and Ft. Lauderdale.
TORONTO WEEKEND-Feb. 11th, 12th and 13th
For more information, call UAC Travel, 2nd Floor
Michigan Union, at 763-2147.
THE UAC PRINT SHOP
has a 15% discount on mimeo work AND will give 10
FREE posters with each minimum order of 25 posters.
We also make signs.
Call 763-1107 or drop by UAC for INEXPENSIVE
QUICK SERVICE.
UAC's TICKET CENTRAL...
Main lobby, Michigan Union
Ticket Central's experienced Box Office personnel will
take away your ticket selling problems and worries-
have your event's tickets sold for a mere 5% commis-
sion!
For more information, call 763-1107.
MUSKET.. ..
Watch for MUSKET'S production of the MUSIC MAN-
coming in April!
WORLD PREMIERE
PRODUCTIONS .. .
A Theatre group designed to produce original scripts;
they are still accepting submissions of original manu-
scripts for consideration. Deadline is February 11, 1977.
Starving artists-here is your chance for recognition!
For further information, call 763-1107.

APPETIZERS
COLD SHRIMP with
Mayonnaise Ravigote ..
COLD CRABMEAT with
Mayonnaise Ravigote ..

$2.95
$3.50

0
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~Cb
(r~-gI~

Today at 7:00 & 9:10
Odypen 6:45
Have a flair for O
artistic writing?
If you are interest-
ed In reviews ag
poetry, and music
or writing feature
stories about theP
drama, dance, ftm
arts: Contact Arts
E d i t o r. c/o The
Michigan Daily4 .y
University Showcast Tonight at 7:00 & 9:00
Production Under 18 Not Admitted
"WHEN YOU COMIN'
BACK, RED RYDER?"x
an adult drama
by Emanuele in
MARK MEDOFF "BLACK
JANUARY 26-29 EMANUELLE"
ARENA THEATRE
(located in Frieze Bldg.)
$2.00 general admissionI
PTP 'Sox Office
764-0450

I

FIVE BLUE POINT
OYSTERS on Half Shell $1.95
DINNERS
All dinners include bread, butter
and SALAD BAR
SHRIMP MARIA .......$6.50
SCALLOPS MARIA .... $6.25
VEAL OSCAR......:..$6.95
OSSOBUCO (sanze osso) $5.75
VEAL PIZZAIOLLA .... $5.95
SEA FOOD CREOLE .. . $6.75
LONDON BROIL ...... $5.95
TOURNADOES
FORESTIER . . ..... $7.95
TOURNADOES ROSSINI $8.95
CREPES NICOISE ...... $6.25
CREPES NANTUA......$7.95
SALAD BAR without any
of the dinners . ... $2.75
VEAL
VEAL MARSALA (cooked
in butter, cheese, garlic
and Marsala wine) ......$4.95
VEAL FRANCAISE (cooked
in butter, lemon, garlic
and parsley)...........$4.75
NOODLES
GREEN-made of flour,
eggs, spinach, tossed with
butter, basil, garlic and
parmesan cheese....... $4.25
WHOLE WHEAT-made of

0

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ANN AriucrI [LAA CC-cl

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CU
Qmm

TONIGHT in AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
A FESTIVAL OF WOMEN DIRECTORS-
The Ann Arbor Film Cooperatiive presents two
nights of films by women, Tonight and Jan. 27.
RIDDANCE
(Marta Meszaros, 1973) 7:00 ONLY
A tale of star-crossed lovers behind the Iron Curtain. This
starkly'realistic film shows that even in Hungary the class
struggle is not yet over. A young working woman from a
lower class family tries to impress her new boyfriend by
pretending to be a university student. When she finally admits
her lack of education, he insists on perpetuating the lie for
the sake of his family. Shown at the New York Festival of
Women's Films. Ann Arbor Premiere. Hungarian with English
subtitles.I
WIVES
(Anja Breien, 1975) 9:00 ONLY
A delightful Norwegian counterpart to Cassavetes' HUS-
BANDS, here three women who meet at a class reunion take
off on a spree. Leaving jobs, husbands, and children behind,
they indulge themselves in doing the things that women are
rarely seen doing. They tease men on the streets, pick up men

whole wheat flour, eggs,
topped with mushrooms
and 'tomato sauce ......

. $4.25

SPAGHETTI
TOMATO ............ $3.15
MUSHROOMS ........ $3.35
MEAT ...............$3.50
MEAT and MUSHROOMS $3.50
WHITE CLAM ........ $4.95
RED CLAM ...........$5.95
MEAT BALLS .........$3.75

AVANT GARDE FILM
LECTURE SERIES...
Brings you PETER KUBELKA and his works of art in

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