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December 11, 1977 - Image 11

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-12-11

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, December 11, 1977-Page 11

Strong second half comeback crucial as,

. .

'listless' roundballers squash Dayton,

71-61

By HENRY ENGELHARDT
In Michigan's pre-season practices
coach Johnny Orr told his players they
had to force themselves a little bit, that
nobody was going to give anything to
them. After yesterday's first half
against Dayton the message may have
sunk in.
THE WOLVERINES reached new
heights in lethargy in the opening 20
minutes and trailed 32-27. But in the
locker room Orr reiterated his message
and his squad dominated the final 15
minutes enroute to a 71-61 victory.
"We were listless," said Orr, 'we had
no enthusiasm or desire. The second
half we decided to come out pressing all
over to get us running."
The press, may not have been that
successful, but it did pump up the
Woi Brines, now 4-1.
"W a had to run against the press. It
was exactly what we wanted to do," ex-
plained a frustiated Flyer coach Don
Donoher. "The three-on-two's, the two-
on-one's, the three-on-one's; we'd do it
every time, but we must convert."
The most vivid example of Dayton's
problems after breaking the press star-
ted with 12:48 left when Mike McGee hit
a ten foot jumper, cutting the Flyers'
lead to 46-43. Michigan slapped on the
press but it was broken easily.
DAYTON FOUND itself with a two-
on-one break at the other end. Erv Gid-
dings was poised and ready to pull the

trigger from about five feet out along
the baseline.
Tommy Staton blurred into the pic-
ture, blocked Giddings' shot from
behind, then lunged out of bounds to
keep the ball alive. Michigan zipped it
quickly up court to McGee who missed
a shot, got his own rebound and tossed
home a short jumper.
Moments later Dayton, now 4-2,
called timeout and the same fans who
booed Michigan at the end of the first
half stood and cheered.
ON MICHIGAN'S next possession
Staton drove the left side and jammed
in a one-hander off the glass, putting
Michigan up 47-46 and, though it was
close for a while, the final outcome was
no longer in doubt.
"We knew that if we could catch them
we could beat them," said Orr.
There were a number of excuses for
Michigan's plodding imitation of
basketball in the first half. "We expec-
ted it," said a not-worried-more-than-
usual Orr, "because of our great effort
on Wednesday (against Louisville)."
Added to that is Joel Thompson's sore
ankle. "JT didn't practice for the two
days after Louisville. We wanted to rest
him, but we never would have gotten
any rebounds." Thompson pulled down
a game-high 12 boards and also blocked
four shots.
PLUS DAVE BAXTER was sick. "He
was weak," Orr noted, "we had to take

him out. Despite the cold, he was very
good." Baxter had 18 points and is now
hitting 58 per cent of his field goals on
the year.
After all the excuses the fact remains
that in the last three games Michigan
has not played all out all the time. The
Wolverines floundered for 20 minutes
against Fordham, blew an 11 point lead
against Louisville and played the first
25 minutes of yesterday's game in a fog.
"We have to play consistently hard,"
said Baxter. "It seems after two or
three baskets we relax. Sometimes we
just stand around and watch him
(Thompson) jump. At halftime we went
over working hard."
"WE KNEW we could beat them,"
reasoned Alan Hardy, "but we had to

overcome ourselves mentally. At half
he (Orr) told us to hawk them on defen-
se and put the press on."
Michigan's inconsistent effort was
indicated by its free throw statistics.
"Free throws are concentration," Or'
said, "it's got to be mental."
The Wolverines hit one charity toss of
five in the opening half (20 per cent)
and six of 12 in the closing half. Their
season percentage seems to be the only
thing they can sink. It is now .620, in-
cluding many misses on front ends of
one-and-ones.
Michigan next travels to Bir-
mingham to play Alabama, then it
returns home for a Saturday afternoqn
contest in Crisler Arena against Central
Michigan.

Second half surge dumps Dayton

DAYTON
MIN FG/A FT/A R A PFi
Paxson ....:.... 40 10/21 3/4 4 3 3
Giddings.........32 5/14 1/2 it 2 3
Zimmerman .... 38 5/12 0/0 4 5 4
Ross..........31 3/7 1/2 7 0 4
Harris.......... 17 214 0/1 0 1 2
Abel ...........6 1/2 2/4 1 0 1
Montague.........9 1/8 0/0 1 0 2
Pohlman.........21 0/2 0/0 1 1 0
Lee ............. 2 0/2 0/0 1 0 1
Brannen......... 2 0/1 0/0 0 0 1
Tyra .............2 0/0 0/0 1 0 1
Totals......... 27/70 7/13 46 12 23

MICHIGAN

T
23
11
10
4
4
2
0
0
0
0
61

MIN
Baxter .......... 32
McGee .......... 34
Thompson . 40
Staton .........32
Hardy ......... 33
Johnson........6
Mark Bodnar .... 6
Lozier..........6
Heuerman...... 11
Totals . .

FG/A
8/15
7/15
7/16
5/11
3/4
1/2
0/0
0/1
32/65

FT/A
2/3
4/6
1/S
0/1
0/1
0/0
0/0
0/1
0/0
7/17

R A
7.
7
6
7
0
1
0
4
2
44 1

3
1
4
2
0
0
0
tl

PF
1
4
3
5
3
0
0
0
S0
16

T
10,
'zT
'o-
7",

Daily Photo by BRAD BENJAMIN
ALAN HARDY of the Wolverines tosses in a reverse layup over Dayton's
Jack Zimmerman. Hardy's second half hustling helped propel Michigan
from a nine-point deficit midway through the second half to a 10-point 71-61
victory over the Flyers.

Halftime score: Dayton 32, Michigan 27
Attendance: 13,549

Swept away

Huskies hu
By GARY KICINSKI
Special to The Daily
HOUGHTON - Will the real Michi-
gan icers please stand up?,
Are they the high-scoring freewheel-
ers that poured in 18 goals against the
Wisconsin Badgers last weekend?
Or are they the frustrated youngsters
who couldn't seem to connect on
anything, as in last night's 7-3 loss to
Michigan Tech?
Senior centerman Stu Ostlund was
the top dog on the Huskie team last
night, as he netted three goals and an
assist.
The Wolverines' play improved
slightly from Friday's lackluster per-
formance, but the results were the
same.
'We couldn't get any real momentum
going," said Michigan coach Dan Far-
rell after the game. "We'd get off the
initial shots, but they'd clear away the
rebound.
"It's like in basketball, if you take
away the inside game, you're going to
have a tough time scoring from the out-
SCOR ES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
MICHIGAN 71, Dayton 61
Michigan State 79, Western Michigan 57
Indiana 85, Murray State 61
Central Michigan 77, Toledo 76
Northwestern 60, Valparaiso 66
Askansas 64, Oklahoma 53
Wake Forest 103, Richmond 73
Indiana St. 102, Evansville 76
N.C. State 76, Penn State 60
N. Carolina 101, Rochester 43
Tennessee114, Georgia St. 62
Holy Cross 67, Yale 62
Louisville 104, Robert Harris 68
South Carolina 72, Clemson 66
Syracuse 107, St. Bonaventure 81
Kentucky 73, Kansas 66
Marquette 81, Florida 67
NBA
Detroit 104, New Orlenas 6
Celveland 102. Atlanta 87
NHL
Philadelphia 4, Chicago 2
Boston 6, Pittsburgh!2
New York Islanders 7, Detroit 4
NFL
Cincinnati 17, Pittsburgh 10
Washington 26, St. Louis 20
DIVISION II CHAMPIONSHIP
Lehigh 33, Jacksonville St.0

imble
side."
Michigan played e'
in the first period,
scored his 17th goal
Dave Debol scored w
left in the period.
Meanwhile, the H
from Ostlund, and G
period at 2-2.
In the second per
frustrated several tin
and Doug Todd both
the puck in front of ti
get off a strong shot.
Ostlund scored hi
Warren Young tallie
lead going into the pe
In the third period
Michigan goaltender
all three goals comin

beleaguered,
deflections.
venly with Huskies Ostlund scored his third gc
as Kip Maurer 1:48 mark when a Bjer
of the season and caroomed off the boards rig
ith just 16 seconds hind in front, who quickly slip:
Palmer. Ostlund's goal sentt
Huskies got goals into a frenzy and prompted o
ord Salt, to end the deposit his Huskie hardhat oi
tribute.
iod the icers were Tech's next goal came wh
mes as Mark Miller Keller shot was nudged into t
had their sticks on Bjerken, who screened Palim
he net, but couldn't way. 4
Michigan's John Olver wa
s second goal and put the light on, but the
d to give Tech a 4-2 disallowed as he batted it in
riod. . stick well above his shoulders
Tech was all over But moments later, John
Rick Palmer with scored his first goal of the se
ig on rebounds and, power play effort. While th
Tech-ed Off

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was delaying another Tech penalty call,
Rick Palmer skated to the bench and
Michigan managed to get six attackers
in on the play.
"We played very bad defensively,"
Farrell added.

-4
4
4
I
.4
I

1st Period
Scoring: 1. M-Maurer (Hampsop, Thayer) 12:32.
2. MT-Ostlund (Bjerken, Drazenovich) 1$:02.3. MT
-Salt (Moy, Hay) 18:57. 4. M-Debol (Kawa, Olver)
19:44.
Penalties: MT-Bjerken (interference); MT-Salt
(elbowing) 14:24; M-Hoene (tripping) 18:29.
2nd Period
Scoring: 5. MT-Ostlund (Bjerken) 6:54. 6. MT-
W. Young (Joelson, waters) 18:15.
Penalties: MT-Hjolmquist (hooking) 3:56; MT-
Drazenovich (holding) 7:06; MT-W. Young (rough-
ing) 10:15; M-McCahilI (elbowing) 10:15; M-
Miller (holding) 13:04.
3rd Period
Scoring: 7. MT-Ostlund (Bjerken, Drazenovich)
1:48. 8. MT-Bjerken (Ostlund, Keller) 9:13. 9. M-
McCahill (Debol, Todd) 12:35. 10. MT-Ferguson
(Keller, Goddard) 19:43.
Penalties: MT-Salt (elbowing) 6:23; MT-D.
Young (elbowing) 10:55.

Saves
1 2 3 T
Homsch(MT) 12 12 16 34
Palmer(M) 912 183
Attendance: 3,693

Scoring
1i a3
Michigan 20
Mich. TechB 2

T
1
3

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