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December 11, 1977 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1977-12-11

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' YM SE NDS HORN CALL'WDAILY

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, December 11, 1977-Page 3
A day of dissent for nation's farmers

I

Protesting Califano degree
The selection of Joseph Califano, secretary of Health, Education
and Welfare as the commencement speaker might suit the fancies
of those who wanted a prestigious speaker at the December 18 exer-
cises. But others, including the Ann Arbor Chapter of the National
Organization for Women, protest the choice on the basis of the
speaker's politics. Califano has repeatedly publicly opposed federal
financial support for poor women who choose to have abortions but
who lack the private funds for those abortions. Califano also will get
an honorary degree while here at the 'U'. Mary Pence,,president of
NOE locally, is urgining all members of the audience who do not agree
it might be appropriate for the University Regents to give Califano
an honorary degree to stand at the end of Califano's speech, and turn
their backs on him "to demonstrate in an orderly but vivid way
their disapproval of his lack-of insight and compassion," she said.
Persons interested in participating in the protest should contact NOW
at 1917 Washtenaw.
Happenings .. .
the happenings don't stop and take a break for the holidays.
From now until the beginning of Winter Term, there will still be
plenty of things to do for those who aren't going home or elsewhere
. . . starting at 11 this morning, is a multi-media presentation of
"Working Women: Our Struggle" in Room 126, East Quad.. . followed
by Jeanne Daman-Scaglione addressing a Joint Woman's Organiza-
tion Meeting at the Beth Israel Chapel, 1429 Hill Street . .. then go to
the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology for a gallery talk on "The Gods
of Egypt in the Graeco-Roman Period" at 2 p.m. . . . loaf until 7:30 to
attend a meeting of the Affirmative Action Committee of the Inter-
Cooperative Council in South Quad's West Lounge . . . then the
Advent begins with "A Festival of Lessons and Carols" in St. Mary's
Chapel at 8 p.m. . . . close off Sunday with a film at the International
Center, "Last Grave at Dimbaza" at 8:30 ... Monday's activities are
few and far between . . . the first, at 4 in the afternoon, is a speech
given by Rene LeGuen, of the Confederation Generale du Travaile,
"Organized Labor and the Socioeconomic Crisis in Contemporary
France" in the Anderson Room of the Union. . . followed by Dudley
Buffa, former Special Assistant to the late Senator Philip Hart, talk-
-ing in the Walker Room of the Union at 7 in the evening.. . then to
mark the last day of Fall Term classes, Dr. Thomas Corbett will
discuss "Cancer can Chemicals" at 12:10 in the Ann Arbor Public
Library Meeting Room.. . the Michigan Economics Society will meet
at 730 p.m. at Room 301 in the Economics Building, to discuss
"Graduate Business School: The Student Perspective". .. the "Raw
Strength and Courage Kayakers" will meet at the same time in Room
2220 of the CCRB . . . at 8 p.m., there will be a performance of the
University Arts Chorale in Hill Auditorium ... and the Tucker Blues
Band and the Prismatic Band will host a benefit concert for the
Tenants' Union at 9 p.m. in the Union Ballroom . . . and Wednesday,
the first day of the study days is marked with one event: a regular
meeting of the Baha'i Student Association at 7:30 p.m. in the Inter-
national. Center . . . Thursday is the day for the annual "Festive
Finale Fling" when from 8 p.m. until 4 a.m. the CCRB is open for all
sports, group games and skits, and lots of other goodies, just bring
your ID . . . Overeaters Anonymous will meet as usual on Friday,
from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at University Hospital Room W5643 . . . Saturday
marks the locker sale at the CCRB, from 10 in the morning until the
first hour of the afternoon. . . and it's opening night for the Residential
College Drama Program of three plays, all student-written. The plays
are Labyrinth, The Stink of Reason and A Cloud in Trousers. Per-
formances begin at 8 p.m. in the East Quad Auditorium. . . those plays
will be performed again on Sunday night at 8 p.m. in the East Quad
Auditorium . . . at the same time in the Green Room of the First
United Methodist Church at the corner of State and Huron, there will
be a Christmas party. That's it for the break: have a happy!
A simple tast of fate
You could say Jerry Jenkins got his just dessert. Jenkins, 23, a
Vermont man, decided to honeymoon in New York City, subjecting
himself to all those things we always hear about in New York. Monday
night, his car was stolen, and taken on a fatal rampage through Times
Square. Learning of that incident, Jenkins said, "Look, my car has
been smashed, my wife had a gun stuck in her face. I hate this
town. I'm never coming back," he said. His bitter words fell on
influential -ears; city officials, a newspaper and a hotel got together
to wine and dine the honeymooners. take them -to Broadway shows,
and give them a free room for the remainder of their honeymoon.
But New York City's finest pulled the red carpet from beneath the
Jenkins' feet when they arrested him on a fugitive warrant for
allegedly passing $2,500 in bad checks in his home state. The publicity
Jenkins received in New York helped investigators link "Jenkins the
check-passer with the Jenkins in the papers." Officers, saying Jenkins
had tried passing a few checks in the Big Apple, making him make
good on his word to leave town.
On the outside - .
...it might start out nice, but don't expect it to stay that way
(it's Ann Arbor, remember?) The prognosis is for a sunny morning.
But increasing cloudiness is on the agenda, so the evening sky will
be all but obscured. The high of 20 degrees is expected to drop to a
low of six. The weatherpersons promise it will get unnoticeably
warmer for Monday, and say we should expect some snow that day-
but only about one or two inches worth.

Some of the 550 tractors pass through
Macon, Ga., on their way to a mass
demonstration at the state Capitol in
Atlanta yesterday. The string of ve-
hicles stretched more than 20 miles in
the tractorcade formed to protest farm
prices. The farmers are asking for 100
per cent parity-an economic yardstick
meaning that their income is in balance
with their cost.

WASHIN'GTON (AP)-Two lines of
tractors, each nearly five miles long,
rolled into Washington yesterday with
their drivers steaming despite gusty
winds and cold.
The temperature was 23 degrees and
winds gusted at more than 20 mph as
the first vehicles crossed into the
District of Columbia from Maryland
and Virginia before noon.
Some of the signs proclaimed "100
percent parity or no food."
THE NUMBER of tractors fell far
short of the 5,000 to 10,000 that had been
predicted earlier, or even the 1,000
estimate made earlier in the day.
Maryland state police said the convoy
was more than 400 vehicles long. In
Virginia, police counted 152 trucks and
tractors.
The demonstration, in Washington
and around the country, is to let
President Carter, the Congress and the
nation know how serious farmers are
about higher farm prices.
The farmers are demanding that the
prices of their goods be allowed to rise
to 100 per cent of parity-an economic
yardstick meaning their income is in
balance with their costs. The measure
is based on farmers' purchasing power
in the period from 1910 to 1914.
Under that formula, wheat would cost
$5.04 a bushel. The price last month
averaged $2.48, 49 per cent of the parity
figure.
THE WASHINGTON protest is being
duplicated in state capitals across the
nation. The protest in Arizona was can-
celed Friday over complaints by
protest leaders there that it would leave
Tucson as the only state capital in the
nation without demonstrators around
the statehouse.
Organizers of the demonstration say
it is designed to convince American
shoppers that marketing costs-what
the middleman spends-are behind
higher food bills, not farm profits.
American Agriculture, a Colorado-
based organization, started the tractor
movement which could end in a farm
strike nationwide next Wednesday.
"BUT IF WE get some promised
from the White House and the Capitol, I

'.AP Photo
won't strike," said Steve Close, a
Colorado farmer with headquarters in a
Washington hotel.
After crossing the District of Colum-
bia line, farmers driving in from
Maryland were to meet with those ap-
proaching from Virginia for a rally at
the Washington monument. Farmers
representing Georgia, Delaware and
Colorado were to speak.

SHEEPSKIN COATS
and VESTS
NOW 50% OFF
HOLIDAY GIFT ITEMS
Now 25% Off
Persian House of imports
320 E. Liberty-769-8555

Ann Arbor, Michigan
YELLOW CHECKER
CAB COMPANY
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TRY OUR METRO
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663-3355

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-COUPON- 2 for 1 Special -COUPON-
I Buy 1 Super Salad -GET 1 FREE
Good: MONDAY THRU THURSDAY
December 12, 13, 14, 15
NOT AVAILABLE FOR CARRY OUT
GOOD AFTER 3 P.M. ONLY
Longevity Cookery
314 E. Liberty
GOURMET NATURAL FOOD RESTAURANT (313) 662-2019
FASCINATING FACT AND FANTASY.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
volume LXXXVIII, No. 78
Sunday, December 11, 1977
.s edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
'postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
~Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
-, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor. .

CAMPUS CHAPEL invites you to worship:
t.Christmas Candlelight Service j
A Celebration of Advent
Sunday, December 11, 1977-6:00 P.M. '
SPECIAL MUSIC BY -
ROYAL WARD, organist CAM PUS
CAROL POSTEMA, flutist C HAPE L
and the CHAPEL CHOiR 123 WASHTENAW CT, ANN ARBOP, MICH!GAN

ART WORLDS

PHOTO WORKSHOPS
2 hrs./wk. 3-6 wks., $28
free lab time available
Photo, Introduction
Photography I
Photography 11
Darkroom I
Darkroom It
Darkroom III
Camera/Darkroom I
Comer/Darkroom1E
Color Printing
Color Slide Devel. (E6)

PHYSICAL ARTS
1/ hrs/wk, 7 wks, $26
frea nrnfir enne nnilable

Institute of Creative Arts
994-8400 ART STUDIO CLASSES
free studio time available
2131/2 So. M ain St. 2%A h trs/wk, 6 wks, $26
Acrylic Pairting
DANCE STUDIO CLASSES Water Color
70 mins/wk., 7 wks, $26 - Creative Drow'Painting
Life Drawing. Beg.
free studio time available Life Drawing, Anatomy
Life Drawing, Adv.
Begam pm Life Drawing, Practice
Ballet, cont., am & pm Sketching
Modern, Beg., am & pm Caligraphy
Modern, Cant., am & pm Papermaking
Jazz, Beg. Graphics, Offset
Jazz, Cont. Int"gli " Printing
Tap, Beg. Ltorp
Tap, Cont. SikscreenPritn
Creative Dance sikscreen Printing
Afro Dance Sculpturei, Clayk
Blues and Jazz Sculpture I. Cay
n.., 1 1 111IV VSculpture II, Costing

AT THE HOUR OF DEATH. By Karlis THE TOLKIEN COMPANION. By
Osis, Ph.D. and Erlendur Haraldsson, J. E. A. Tyler. Come to Middle Earth-but
Ph.D. The first fully-documented. not until you've read this indispensable
scientific study of the soul's survival. guide. Here is every known fact, date,
AT TI HE HOU[R OF DEATH is based on "foreign" word, and etymological allusion
interviews with 1000 doctors and nurses occurring in the celebrated LORD OF
11 r1a n itTaoQ:r-r rl-01,11- r rc n , TLI IT NM 'C t+ lncrv it ;nnll.n,,o bictnr..

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