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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 10, 1977 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-12-10

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Page 2-Saturday, December 10, 1977-The Michigan Daily
ChurchWorship Serices
ANN ARBOR CHURCH OF CHRIST UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF CHRIST AMERICAN BAPTIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd. Presently Meeting at the Ann Arbor Y, CAMPUS CENTER AND
(one block west of U of M Stadium) 530 S. Fifth FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bible Study-Sunday, 9:30 a.m.; David Graf, Minister 502 E. Huron-63-9376
Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. Students Welcome. O. Carroll Arnold, Minister
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m. and For information or transportation: Ronald E. Cary, Minister
6:00 p.m. 663-3233 or 426-3808. Worship-10 a.m.; Bible Study-11
Need transportation? Call 662-9928. 10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship. a.m.
* * * * * * Fellowship Meeting-Wednesday at
FIRST UNITED METHODIST UNIVERSITY LUHERAN 7:45 p.m.
State at Huron and Washington CHAPEL (LCMS)
Dr. Donald B. Strobe 1511 Washtenaw Ave.-663-5560 LORD OF LIGHT
The Rev. Fred B. Maitland Alfred T. Scheps, Pastor LURAF GHUTC
The Rev. E. Jack Lemon Sunday Services at 9:15 and 10:30 LUTHERAN CHURCH
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00. a.m. (the campus ministry of the ALC-LCA
Church School at 9:00 and 11:00. Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m. Gordon Ward, Pastor
Adult Enrichment at 10:00. Midweek Worship Wednesday, 10:00 801S.Forest at HillSt-
WESLEY FOUNDATION p.m. Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.
UNITED METHODIST * * * Sunday Bible Study: "Revelation"-
CAMPUS MINISTRY CAMPUS CHAPEL-A Campus 9:30 a.m.
W. Thomas Shomaker, Ministry of the Christian Sunday Supper-6:00 p.m. ($1.25).
Chaplain/Director Reformed Church Program-7:00 p.m. (Topic: "World
Extensive programming for under- 1236 Washtenaw Ct.-668-7$21 Hunger").
grads and grad students. Rev. Don Postema, Pastor Monday Bible Study: "The First Pro-
* * * 10:00 a.m.-"People of Christmas- phets"-7:30p.m.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH Joseph." Thursday evening Bible study on
OF THE NAZARENE 6 p.m. - Christmas Candlelight North Campus.
409 S. DivisionSevc. * * *
Steve Bringardner, Pastor * * * CANTERBURY HOUSE
Church School-9:45 a.m. FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH (Episcopal Student Foundation)
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m. Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister 218 N. Division
Evening Worship-6:00 p.m. 608 E. William, corner of State 6:5.0606
* * * Worship Service-10:30 a.m. Chaplain: Rev. Andrew Foster
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH Sunday Morning Worship-10 a.m. Choral Evensong Sunday evenings at
1001 E. Huron * * * 700 p.m. at St. Andrew Episcopal
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice, MinistersC7:0 N. ivsi.
10 a.m.-Morning Service. FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Church,306N. ivision.
5 p.m.-Informal Worship. SCIENTIST * * *
* * * 1833 Washtenaw FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL Sunday Services and Sunday School 1432 Washtenaw Ave.
(Catholic) -10:30a.m. 662-4466
331 Thompson-663-0557 Wednesday Testimony Meeting-8:00 Sunday:
Weekend Masses: p.m. ':30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship.
Saturday-10p.m. Child Care Sunda-under 2 years. 12:00-Coffee Hour.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 Christian Science Reading Room--, 4:00 p.m.-Undergraduate Fellow-
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m. 206 E. Liberty, 10-5 Monday-Saturday; ship and Supper.
Tueda-3:0 ~m.BohoferSem-
North Campus-9:30 a.m. closed Sundays. Tuesday-3:30 p.m.-Bonhoffer .
inar.
AVIS RENT-A-CAR Join The Daily
HOLIDAY SPECIAL ST
from WED., DEC. 23rd thru TUES., JAN. 3rd
WITH WE CAN INCREASE
$15.95 PeryUNLIMITED YOUR LSAT SCORE
rom Day MILEAGE Call or Write:
University LSAT Preparation Service Inc.
2200 Fuller Rd., Suite 9128
Call for Information and Reservations Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105
~13-995-4O14
"S-1 OV CAtL ANYTIME
If you have Used Books
STUDNTSto Sell-- Read This!
As the Semester end approaches-bringing with it a period of heavy book selling by students-
ULRICH'S would like to review with you their BUY-BACK POLICY.
Used books fall into several categories, each of which-because of the law of supply and
demand-has its own price tag. Let's explore these various categories for your guidance.
CLASS I. CLOTHBOUND
A textbook of current copyright-used on our compus-and which the Teaching Department
involved has approved for re-use in upcoming semesters-has the highest market value. If
ULRICH'S needs copies of this book we will offer a minimum of 50% off the list price for copies
in good physical condition. When we have sufficient stock of a title for the coming semester,

ULRICH'S will offer a "WHOLESALE PRICE" which will be explained later in this article. (THIS
IS ONE REASON FOR SELLING ALL YOUR USED BOOKS AT ONCE!)
CLASS II. PAPERBOUND
Paperbacks are classified in two groups: A. Text Paperbacks; B. Trade Paperbacks
A. Text Paperbacks will be purchased from you as Class I books above.
B. Trade Paperbacks would draw an approximate offer of 25% of the list price when in excel-
lent condition.
CLASS Ill.
Some of the above Class I or Class 11 books will be offered which have torn bindings, loose
pages, large amounts of highlighting and underlining, or other physical defects. These will be
priced down according to the estimated cost of repair or saleability.
CLASS IV.
Each semester various professors decide to change text for a given course. These decisions on
change of textbooks are made in echelons of THINKING AND AUTHORITY for above the level
of your local book retailers, AND ULRICH'S HAS NO PART IN THE DECISION. (Quite often we
have MANY copies of the old title of which you have only ONE.)
However, ULRICH's does enter the picture by having connections with over 600 other book-
stores throughout the country. We advertise these discontinued books and sell many of them
at schools where they are still being used. ULRICH'S does this as a service to you and pays you
the BEST POSSIBLE price when you sell them to us with your currently used books.
CLASS V.
Authors and publishers frequently bring out new editions. When we "get caught" with an old
edition, let's accept the fact that it has no value on the wholesale market, and put it on the'
shelf as a reference book or sell it cheap for a bargain reference book.
You will find that you come out best In the long run when you sell ALL your books
to ULRICH'S.

UNESCO slaps South Africa

By RENE BECKER
DETROIT - The United States
Commission for UNESCO (United
Nations Educational, Scientific, and
Cultural Organization) passed a
resolution denouncing the govern-
ment of South Africa for its denial of
human rights of blacks and non-
whites here yesterday.
The Commission noted the govern-
ment obstruction of the educational,
scientific and cultural development
for blacks.
THE COMMISSION resolved to
direct the Human Rights Committee
to establish a task force to develop a
position and' policy recommendation
on South Africa. It also believes the
recommendations, which will be
given to the State Department, will
influence U.S. foreign policy.
The members of the commission
expanded their view of Human
Rights in relation to South Africa on
the third and final day of their 41st
annual meeting at the Renaissance

Center. The day was devoted to a
symposium on international human
rights.
The issue of human rights is of
particular interest to University
Regent Sarah Power, chairperson of
the U.S. commission. The Regents
are being pressed by social action
groups on campus to sell all Univer-
sity investments in corporations op-
erating in South Africa.
POWER SAID the symposium
"made me realize how very complex
the issue is." She said the Regents
must "look at all of the elements
involved."
Power, aware that an answer to the
South African investment issue has
been slow in coming, said, "I'm a
little concerned that something
hasn't been done yet." She said she
would raise the issue at the next
Regents meeting.
But Emmitt Roberts, a member of
the Lawyers' Committee (a group
concerned with human rights), said

Mlliken"insensitive,"
says Sen. Fitzgerald.'1

(Continued from Page 1)
medical embarrassment to the state."
"Responding to the marching orders
of the Michigan Department of Agricul-
ture, every member of which he ap-
points, the Farm Bureau was protec-
ted," he charged. "This is an outrage-
ous indictment of insensitivity."
Fitzgerald said he finds fault with
Milliken's handling of the tandem tank-
er issue and "insensitivities" in the
sphere of social services.
THE SENATOR also accused the ad-
ministration as unable to bring home
federal revenue to help the state's
floundering budget.
"We have an embarrassing return of
federal funds from Washington," he
said. "We are a high tax-paying state
but we rank forty-ninth in the return of
tax dollars. We don't have the money to
provide dollars for higher education,
social services, and public health.
"We're always looking at mechan-
isms to cut the budget. We're always
looking to borrow from cookie jar funds
and raising taxes, things that are gen-
erally counter-productive to economic
development and tax base preserva-
tion."
Fitzgerald vowed that he could be a
more "aggressive pursuer",of federal
revenue than Milliken.
"IF WE'VE SEEN Governor Milli-
ken's performance with a Republican
President living possibly 100 miles from

Traverse City, what is his performance
going to be with a Democratic peanut
farmer from Plains?"
On other issues, Fitzgerald, chair-
person of the Special Senate Committee
on Spouse Abuse, said the state must
encourage law enforcement agencies
and prosecutors to issue warrants and
make arrests in domestic abuse cases,
and to bring such cases to court. Wife-
beating has been brought to public at-
tention in Michigan with the two recent
acquittals of women who killed their
husbands after repeated beatings.
"That old opinion that we don't want
to get involved, I am afraid, has caused
a lot of women in our society to be
abused," he said.
ALTHOUGH HIS STAND on domes-
tic violence will win him points with
concerned women, his stand on abor-
tion will no doubt alienate some women
voters. He's against them, period.
On the current drilling in the Pigeon
River area and similar questions on the
tender balance between ecological con-
cerns and the state's employment and
energy needs, Fitzgerald said he favors
the drilling as long as proper safeguard
steps are taken.
"I am sensitive to the loss of
irretrievable wildlife -areas" he said,
'but if it has been shown coniicusively,
as I believe it has in this case, that we
tave taken every possible step to
.safeguard the area, then the drilling
should proceed."

activist groups could bypass the
Regents.
ROBERTS' group is now investi-
gating state statutes which forbid
institutions, like the University, from
investing in corporations which oper-
ate in a segregated environment.
"I believe that Michigan is one of
those states," he said.
Thomas Bergenthal, International
Law professor at the University of
Texas, agreed with Roberts. He
added that laws could be made along
those lines where they don't already
exist.
Brian Kuttner, a member of the
South African Liberation Committee
(SALC), said in a recent interview
that his group has also been investi-
gating that possibility. He said it was
a state law that moved the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin to action on their
investments.
Bergenthal was also interested in
the moral. aspects of the issue. "I
think churches and universities
should look closely at who they invest
in," he said. "It seems to me that uni-
versities have social responsibilities
beyond financial ones.
Iranian
Students
prQtest
p-
arrest,
(Continued from Page 1)
The Michigan provision under
which the student was arrested
states that "any person who shall
assemble, march, or parade on any
street, highway or public place...
while wearing a mask"' is guilty of a
misdemeanor.
The law doesn't apply in cases
involving Halloween masks and oth-
er similar circumstances.
RUSSELL BALCH, a third year
University law student who is rep-
resenting the arrested protester,
yesterday filed a motion to dismiss
the case "on grounds that there are
Constitutional problems with the
statute."
"As a citizen I walk around seeing
a lot of people wearing ski masks -
they may be in violation of the
statute," said Balch.
No students wore masks at yester-
day ' dem6itration. Some, how-
ever, said they have worn them in the
past for protection from SAVIK
(Iranian Secret Police) agents on
campus. The protesters wouldn't
revealstheir identities for fear of
reprisal.
"THE ARREST was a police con-
spiracy," said the student who was
arrested last month. He said that last,
month's demonstration was peaceful
and there was no excuse for his
arrest.
Detective Charles Ferguson of the
Ann Arbor Police Department, who
is handling the city's investigation,
said he couldn't comment on the
arrest.
Another police spokesman said he
doesn't have the "vaguest idea how
often the statute was used before this
case." He said the department keeps
no statistics "on that type of thing."
BALCH SAID the statute was
previously aimed at quashing Ku
Klux Klan rallies on campus.
ISA members said they are "deter-

mined to carry this struggle till thex
voice of our people is heard by all
freedom-loving and progressive,'
people."

CAMPUS CHAPEL invites you to worship:
Christmaes Candlelight Servicer
A Celebration of Advent;
$undq, December 1, 1977-6M 0P.M.
SPECIAL MUSIC BY
ROYAL WARD, organist CAMPUS
CAROL POSTEMA, flutist CHAPE L
and the CHAPEL CHOIR 1236 WASHTENAW CT., ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN "
8th ANNUAL U-M SKI TEAM
SKI SWAP
New or Used Alpine & X-Country Ski Equipm'ent, Clothing, Etc.
Where: U-M SPORTS COLISEUM
721 S. Fifth at Hill St.
TO SELL: Bring items to Coliseum on Friday, Dec. 9 4 pm to 10 pm,
TO BUY: Come Browse in Coliseum on Saturday, Dec. 10 9 am to 7 pm
INFO, CALL 662-5477 or 665-9419
Sales commissions charges to help support U-M Ski Team
Please no cable bindings or lace boots (except child's)

1'

MR

(

c

1

Who else could do him justice?

The one and only Groucho
has brought you 86 years of his
fondest memories-in hundreds
of photos and drawings. In post-
ers and playbills. In his zaniest

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