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December 07, 1977 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-12-07

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4
A
Dage 10-Wednesday, December 7, 1977-The Michigan Doily
1978
U. 5

1978
Calendar
Smorgasbord
Abstract Art
Albrecht Durer
Alte Stiche
American Vision
Ancient Icons
Anglund Date Book
Antiques Magazine Engagement
Austria
Baby Animals
Backroads of America
Ballet
Beatrix Potter
Beautiful America
Bless the Beasts
Botticelli
Cape Dorset
Cat (kilban)
Circle Astrological
Crafts Engagement
Dance
Dancing Time
Diane Dawson Cat
Don't Call Me Sweetheart
Eat and Run Engagement
Egon Schiele Folk Quilts
Eliot Porter Forest Friends
Eric Sloane Frank Frazetta
Frank Herbert's Dune
From Milady to Ms
Fussball
Gay Engagement
Giant Riddle
Girls
Great Calendar of Art
Great Lakes Country
Guiness Records
Gustav Klimist J Hu idertwasser
High West 1Ching Diary
Hobbit Desk Impressionism
Horse-Bo-Tree Impressionists
Impressionists Weekly
In the Company of Cats
In Detail
' In Praise of Women Artists
Intermezzo
James Herriot
Jewish Engagement'
Jewish Folk Art
J.R.R. Tolkien
Kate Greenaway
Kibi in China
Kids Say the Darndest Things
Leonardo
Les Blacklock
Little House on the Prairie .
Ilewellyns Astrological
Macmillan Children
Mad Jubeliee
Michaelangelo
Mickey Mouse
Monet
Mother Goose
Mountains of the World
Movie Fans
Mystery & Suspense
Native Voices Engagement
Nature 78 Power Boats
Needlepoint Pre-Raphaelites
No Fault Tennis Pride of Cats
Norman Rockwell Pumping Iron
Oxford Almanacs Purple Thumb
Photographert Quilt Engagement
Regatta
Rembrandt
Roger Dean
Romance
Sailing
San Francisco
Scottish Clans
Sea
Shalom Young People
Sherlock Holmes

Sierra Club Engagement
Sierra Club Little Creatures
Sierra Club Trail
Sierra Club Wilderness
Sierra Club Wildlife
Skiers
Snoopy
Star Trek
Star Wars
Super Disasters
Swiss Photo Album
4Tall Ships
Tarzan
Tennis
Thai Art
Thony
Toulouse Lautrec,
Treasures of Islam
Tribute to Elvis
Undersea Life
Van Gogh
Vanity Fair
Waltons
Watership Down
Woman's Engagement
Yachting
(Over 100 others)
QUANTITIES LIMITED
SERVED
9:30-8:30 Daily
12-6 SUNDAY
NO RESERVATIONS NECESSARY
ia i

House panel rules out
mandatory retirement

i

LANSING (UPI) - The House
Civil Rights Committee has unani-
mously approved legislation banning
mandatory retirement policies in
public and private jobs.
The landmark bill, reported to the'
House floor yesterday, states that
employers cannot dismissemployes
solely on the basis of age.
SENIOR CITIZENS' rights advo-
cates say forced retirement at 65
consigns many competent workers to
unwanted idleness, robbing society of
their talents and robbing them of
their dignity.
Others, however, have warned that
eliminating mandatory retirement
may mean fewer new jobs will be
created for unemployed young per-
sons.

The bill's sponsor, Rep. Perry
Bullard, (D-Ann Arbor), said dis-
crimination against the elderly in the
name of increasing job opportunities
is no more justified than discriminat-
ing against women to make more
jobs for men.
THE MEASURE is not expected to
have a dramatic impact on the job
market since it is believed that most
elderly workers will voluntarily
choose early or normal retirements
-especially if adequate benefits are
provided.
"Even those strongly in favor don't
believe this is going to be a large
number of people who will decide to
keep working after 65," said Rep.
Wilbur Brotherton, (R-Farmington).

Links to fashion. For bracelets, fashion always
embraces the eternal, universal chain, expressed in
equally eternal, universal 14 karat yellow gold. For
every occasion, every style, every taste. From our
very complete collection of chain bracelets: A.$40.
B. $100. C. $60. D.$65. E. $30. Come see them all.
Something Beautiful for Everyone.,

Kaffeeklatsch AP Photo
These Bloomington, Minn., ducks can pursue their favorite pastime, quacking, anywhere-even on thin ice. Their
favorite pond shrank this week as the freezing weather turned much of the ducks' home into ice.
CLASHES ;WIT H CAR TER STAND:
House votes for B-1

Fine Jewelers Since 1861
Briarwood Mall - Ann Arbor
Also Detroit - Saginaw,

WASHINGTON (AP) - The House
voted yesterday to keep B-1 bomber
production alive despite President Car-
ter's bid to kill the program.
By a vote of 191-166, the House ap-
INTRODUCING:
JUNIOR and JEFF
OLIVER and LLOYD
at
DASCOLA
STYLISTS
Liberty off State
REDKEN-IMAGE

proved $462 million for building the fifth
and sixth B-1 aircraft, going along with
arguments that limited production of
the manned bomber should continue if
only as a bargaining chip in disarma-
ment talks with the Russians.
CONGRESS had appropriated the
money for the two aircraft before de-
ciding to scrub production money for
future B-1s. Four research and devel-
opment models have been built.
Carter and opponents had argued
that to build the two aircraft would be a
waste of money. "Everyone agrees you
cannot fight a war with six B-1s," said
Rep. Joseph Addabbo, (D-N.Y.)
But Rep. Robert Dornam, (R-Calif.),
who represents/the district where the
North American Rockwell aircraft are
assembled, said that building two more
aircraft would keep the assembly line
and the country's strategic defense op-
tions open.,

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number five and six until we get author-
ization from the Air Force."
THE SENATE had rejected the
production money, which is part of a
$7.8 billion appropriations bill. Now the
Senate must take a second vote on the
issue.
By a vote of 182-181, the House ap-
proved some $200 million to help the
poor pay their utility bills this winter.)
The fuel bill program is identical to
the emergency measure passed to aid
the poor last winter. It has already been
approved by the Senate in its version of
the appropriations bill.
OPPONENTS SAID state govern-
ments and private groups should aid
the poor, while supporters said the aid
was a stopgap, humanitarian measure.
Rep., Robert Giamo, (D-Cann,), the
chairman of the House Budget Commit-
tee, said the nation could not add new
social service programs indefinitely
while cutting taxes, as Congress will
likely do next year.
Rep. Robert Michel, (R-Ill.), said
many states failed to spend the utility
bill money they received last year. He
complained that the availability of the
fuel bill money had to be advertised i
his hometown of Peoria. "This doesn't
sound like an emergency program to
me," he said.
The appropriations bill also included
some'$80 million to keep the nation's
nuclear breeder reactor program
roughly on schedule despite President
carter's attempts to kill it.

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"IF WE ARE going to err, let us err
on the side of strength," Dornan told
the House.
In California, a spokesman for Rock-
well said the company would continue
to approach the B1 project cautiously.
He said until the issue is settled. the
company would not rehire any of the
1,500 persons it let go when the program
was abandoned by the Carter admini-
stration.
"We don't know what further steps
are going to have to be taken by Con-
gress," said the spokesman, David
Wright. "No matter what happens in
Congress, we can't start up on (planes)

Vj

Carter urban policy

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SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - The head
of the nation's largest union of public
employees said yesterday the still-
evolving White House urban policy is
"a modest battle plan in a crisis that
calls for an all-out assault." He called
for city leaders to join with labor in
seeking a bolder program.
Jerry Wurf, head of the American
Federation of State, County and Mu-
nicipal Employees (AFSCME), spoke
to members of the National League of
Cities. Minutes later, several influ-
ential Democratic mayors praised Car-
ter's urban record.
THE MAYORS signaled that' they
were not yet ready to join the chorus of
skepticism concerning the urban plan
when Henry Maier of Milwaukee said,
"I don't think that with the kinds of
things on his desk, we can expect a lot
more."
In praising Carter, Richard Hatcher
of Gary, Ind., head of the Conference of
Democratic Mayors, nevertheless call-
ed for more emphasis on job programs.
Outgoing New York Mayor Abraham
Beame agreed.
Janet Hayes of San Jose, Calif., was
more skeptical, telling reporters, "The
president can't understand the

nayors say
preliminary draft of a Carter urban
plan.
Wurf told the city officials, "We must
be allies in a war on a common enemy;
a war on the deterioration of public ser-
vices, on the multi-headed monster of
urban decay."
ALWAYS BLUNT, he said the well-
publicized Carter urban policy, now in a
"semi-final" stage according to one
federal official, "is a half-hearted ges-
ture in a situation that calls for full-
scale com'mitment."
The Carter plan currently revolves
around creation of a urban develop-
ment bank as well as an infusion of cash
into programs that already serve city
interest - mainly job programs,
special revenue-sharing and funds for
economic development projects such as
public works.
The strategy was drafted by a
Cabinet-level group, and it is commonly
understood in Washington that the
White House probably will make sharp
cutbacks in the proposed level of new
urban funding.
ROBERT EMBRY, assistant secre-
tary of Housing and Urban Develop-
ment, and a chief architect of the urban
strategy. said the current urban nolicv

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open weave, hand crocheted look by Organically Grown.
They're made in a machine washable acrylic/nylon blend,
light to touch and wear.
A. Peasant influence shows at the gathered tie neck and
waist. Fancy ribbed knit, frilled wrist. Cream or blue, or pink.
S-M-L sizes. $21.

I

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