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December 06, 1977 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-12-06

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, December 6, 1977-Page 9
Meany criticizes Carter on

"r
Jobless r
LOS ANGELES (AP) - President
Carter's first year in office drew
mixed reviews yesterday from
George Meany, who told the AFL-
CIO the administration's pluses are
clouded by high unemployment and
continued slack in the economy.
The AFL-CIO president charged
that "realistic action" to deal with
those problems is stymied by an
apparent shift of priorities -away
from jobs -- "the President's No. 1
campaign issue" - in an effort to
please conservatives concerned with
balancing the budget.
FOR THE FIRST TIME, Meany
also urged Carter not to reappoint
Federal Reserve Board Chairman
Arthur Burns, who he said was "the
first barrier to restoring economic
health to America."
The labor leader's comments were
in a report released yesterday in
advance of the AFL-CIO's 12th con-
stitutional convention opening here
Thursday.
Carter's election, he said, "brought
into office a sense of hope and a spirit
of inspiration that has brightened the
land."
MEANY PRAISED Carter for his
stand on human rights and for
launching "a number of imaginative
legislative initiatives" dealing with
welfare reform, energy, the mini-
mum wage and revisions in labor
laws. He also sided with the Presi-
dent against those who say Carter
has proposed too many programs too

4,

ate, sickly
strong support in his 1976 election
campaign, said, "It is still too early
to grade the Carter administration.
"FOR THE PLUSES - and they
are many indeed - are clouded by
the continued slack in the economy
and the high rate of unemployment,"
he added.
The best way to balance the budget
is to put people back to work, Meany
said in noting the nation's 6.9 per cent
jobless rate.
"Thus, while the Carter adminis-
tration and the Congress have in-
creased spending for public works,
youth employment and public serv-
ice jobs, the result has not been
enough," he said.

economy
"THE PRIMARY CAUSE of the
projected $60 billion budget deficit is
unemployment, and the only cure is
jobs.",1
Unemployment will be a major
theme of the AFL-CIO's four-day
convention, with the delegates ex-
pected to call for more government
spending and new restrictions
against low-cost foreign imports,
which union leaders claim are put-
ting thousands of Americans out of
work.
Meany has long been one of Burns'
harshest critics, but it was the first
time he publicly urged Carter to get
rid of the head of the nation's central
bank.

AP Photo
Meanwhile, in balmier climes... APh
Yes, in some remote corners of the world warmth still exists. Take, for example, Dallas, Texas-where these
youngsters enjoyed the recent unseasonably warm weather bicycling through a park.
100 KILLED IN MA LAYSIAN DISASTER:
Hijacked plane crashes

JOHORE BAHARU, Malaysia (AP)
-A hijacked Malaysian airlines jet
with 100 persons aboard exploded and
crashed Sunday night in southern
Malaysia, airline officials reported.
Police said rescue workers found no
survivors.
Sources at Kuala Lumpur airport in
the Malaysian capital said the pilot
radioed before th- explosion that his
plane had been seized by, terrorists of
the Japanese Red Army. Airline of-
ficials said an unknown number of per-
sons commandeered the twin-jet
Boeing 737 but they did not know if the
hijackers were Red Army members.
They reported the seven-member crew
and all but 20 of the 93 passengers were
Malaysians, including. Agriculture
Minister Ali Haji Amad.
TWO OF THE foreign passengers
were identified as World Bank officials
from Washington-O.D. Hoerr, iden-
tified by the bank as an American
education planner, and S.S. Naime, a
senior architect from Afghanistan.
The twin-jet Boeing 737 "disap-
peared, the metal shattered and the
whole thing broke up into many small
pieces," Malaysian Interior Minister
Ghazali Shafie said.
An airline spokesman said the
hijackers seized control of the plane 10
minutes after it left the Malaysian
resort island of Penang at 7:54 p.m.
(7:24 a.m. EST) on a flight to Kuala
Lumpur and Singapore. The plane
touched down briefly at Kuala Lumpur
airport and took off for Singapore at the
hijackers' demand, he said.
At 8:36 p.m. the plane crashed near
Kampong Tajung Kutang, a small
village about 13 miles west of this

southern Malaysian town, according to
the spokesman.
POLICE REPORTED an 18-year-old
boy in the village told them he saw the
jet "shoot upward," then go into a dive
and explode in flames.
Two Malaysian military helicopters
hovered over the wreckage with
spotlights to assist in an all-night sear-
ph of survivors by police, soldiers and
civilian volunteers.
The Japanese Red Army is a small,
ultra-left organization which has been
involved in at least a half-dozen major
terrorist incidents since 1970.
Police in Japan estimate it has only
20 to 30 regular members and an
unknown number of sympathizers.
They are dedicated to fomenting
revolution in Japan but operate mostly
out of the country.
JAPANESE EMBASSY sources in
Kuala Lumpur were quoted by Tokyo
newspapers as saying they were unable
to obtain any information pointing to
involvement by the Red Army, which
last September hijacked a Japanese
plane over India.
Some Japanese newspapers
speculated the hijacking may have
resulted from domestic political
disputes in Malaysia.
As a result of the crash, there was
new talk of a possible protest job action
by pilots worldwide. The president of
the Canadian Air Line Pilots
Association said the international pilots
federation was considering what action
to take.
MALAYSIAN OFFICIALS said air-
port security would be tightened im-

mediately throughout the country.
Eyewitnesses on the ground at the
southern tip of Malaysia said they saw
the plane wobble unsteadily at about
1,000 feet, suddenly dive, explode and
smash into the swamp, where it ex-
ploded again., They said bodies, luggage
and pieces of aircraft scattered over
the area with each explosion. The crash
left a large crater in the swamp.
The site is about 20 miles north of
Singapore city, across the Johore Strait
in Malaysia.
The newspaper Malay Mail said the
eyewitness descriptions indicated that
the hijackers probably struggled with
the crew or passengers and set off ex-
plosives.

soon. .. ..
"The need for so many new pro-.
grams was an obvious result of the FR A
paucity of initiative from the White ; 5C * , hotdp s
House during the previous eight ,,.4
years," Meany said. 310MAYNARDST
"But Meany, who gave Carter
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