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December 04, 1977 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8-Sunday, December 4, 1977-The Michigan Daily

Inspectors face landlord

-tenant

(Continued from Page 1)
Then the inspector doesn't enforce
the same standards on himself,"
Harrison said.
Harrison also accused inspectors
of prescribing arbitrary ways of

and said his inspectors
ly objective. "The wh
program is to see ti
buildings in the city ai
to minimal habitables
said. "That's all we're
Paul Teich, attorney

"Some property owners

can't afford to

needed repairs after an inspection, so the
offers to buy it from them very cheaply. Th
spector doesn't enforce the same standard
self. "
-Tom Harrison, props

are complete- is just a beginning," he said. "If you
ole idea of our get too tough, it could actually hurt
hat all rental tenants because landlords will pass
re maintained on cost repairs to their tenants and
tandards," he tack on a little more profit for their
after." effort."
for the Michi- Teich said he suspects the depart-
ment comes down hardest on student
housing.
male the "They (student landlords) are
'inspector fairly compliant with what the
inspectorssay, whereas the average
den the in- landlord will hassle the inspector,' he
s on him- said.
BUT DONALDSON disagreed. "It
doesn't matter if the tenants are stu-
erty owner dents or not," he said. "Our inspec-
tions are directly related to the build-
Housing Law ing."
heoften sheaPeter Schoch, director of the
eofthenfer University Off-Campus Housing Of-
ut the infre- fice, said inspectors do concen-
trate on student housing - and with
good reason.
forcement is "Youhave to realize that stand-
housing, but it ards have to be different with frats

and sororities - residents
common space and there is a1
density of them," he said.

"THERE WAS a Trony (Realty)
house on Packard that caught fire,
but the fire was contained because of
proper code enforcement. It saved
lives of students who lived there," he
said.
Despite conflicting public opinion
surrounding housing conditions are
poor.I
This fall the Survey Research
Center's Urban Environmental Re-

share
higher

search Program conducted a study
showing tenants were concerned
about widespread structural prob-
lems in their rental units.
THIN WALLS, heating problems,
lack of adequate hot water, and lack
of security from break-ins were
among those most frequently cited
by tenants. More than half of the
renters indicated that their housing
units were in needofhrepair, accord-
ing to Sandra Newman, director of
the study.
Teich directed a survey last year

[onflici
which concluded that 90 per cent of
all student non-University housing
contains serious code violations.
Teich said although the department
has become more efficient in inspect-
ing, "there are still an enormous
number of houses with code prob-
lems."
Yadlosky said the situation would
be improved if landlords maintained
their buildings as a constant process
and didn't waid for the inspector to
pay a visit before making repairs. -

Arab leaders may band against

correction to landlords.
"THEY'LL TELL you to make a
repair that costs $3,500 when the
same thing could be done another
way for $5," he said.
Donaldson disputed the criticism

gan Student Assembly
Reform Project, said
tenant complaints abc
quency of inspections.
"GOOD CODE en
fundamental to better t

No Waiting!

Sadat s Mideat
(Continued from Page 1)
Fetah Ismail of South Yemen and Dr. George Habash of
the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.
Their private meetings preceded another late-night ses-
sion of formal talks.
Habash, a pediatrician-turned-revolutionary who leads
the radical Marxist PFLP, appeared to win some support
for his fervent opposition to resumption of the Geneva Mid-
east peace conference.
"We are not thinking about Geneva any more, because
it's dead," said Nayef Hawatmeh of the Democratic Front,
a moderate Marxist guerrilla group which previously fol-
lowed Syria's lead and supported talks. "The Palestinian
resistance is moving out of the Saudi-Egyptian orbit."

peace intiative
SYRIAN SOURCES said Assad is convinced that the
Geneva talks have been derailed for the foreseeable future
by Sadat's mission to Jerusalem and the ensuing uproar in
the Arab world.
In addition, they said, the Syrian leader doubts Sadat
can obtain any real concessions from Israeli Prime Minister
Menahem Begin except return of the Sinai in a two-way
peace deal that would leave Syria and the Palestinians on
their own.
Sadat has insisted from the beginning of his peace initia-
tive that he is not seeking a separate peace, and that no
progress is possible without return of Syria's Golan Heights
and creation of a Palestinian state, on the occupied West

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An inspection at 221 N

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(Continued from Page 1)
Yadlosky and Pappas then climbed a
steep staircase to the first floor kitchen,
where the inspector began to scribble
down more violations. Leona Schipper,
a first floor tenant, was sitting in the
kitchen.
"You should know that the second
and third floors don't have hot water at
all times," she told Yadlosky.
"YOU SHOULD TALK to us before
complaining to him," Pappas retorted.
"How can we contact you when you
live in Livonia?" Schipper asked.
"You tell him (Yadlosky) nothing,"
Pappas replied. Schipper claimed Pap-
pas' husband had told her if she said
anything she would be evicted.
"SHE'S A LIAR," Pappas told
Yadlosky.
"We have to know the truth," the in-
spector repied.

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I

We proceeded to a bedroom adjoining
the kitchen and Yadlosky asked if it
was permanently occupied. Pappas
said it was only used as a guest room.
But Schipper claimed someone did live
in the room and accused Pappas of ly-
ing. Yadloski then classified the room
as having an occupant, which qualifies
it for more potential violations than if it
was a guestroom.
YADLOSKY SAID he likes tenants to
go along with him on inspections
because there are "things a person
living there wouldn't miss that I might
miss."
Schipper then took Yadlosky to in-
spect her room, followed by Pappas. ,
"This is what I'm paying $140 a mon-
th for," said Schipper, as she sat on her
unmade bed in a medium-sized bed-
room. "I'm scared to death about the
electricity - sometimes the lights in
here go out three or four time a night."
YADLOSKY NOTED a lack of elec-
trical outlets in the room on his yellow
pad as Schipper continued to point out
other violations in the room.
"Until when is your rent paid up to?"
Pappas asked her.
"What do you mean?" Schipper re-
plied.
"HOW MUCH future rent have you
paid?" Pappas said.
"Until the end of the month."
"Then by the end of the month you
have to be out of here," Pappas de-
clared.
"IF YOU WANT to evict her," Yad-
lonsky interrupted, "you must do it
through the court, Mrs. Pappas."
"I want you out," Pappas told Schip-
per again. "You drunk people destory
the place."
Yadlosky said he tries not to involve
himself in disputes between landlord
and tenant, except when one side
reaches an extreme. The inspector said
harsh exchanges like those between
Pappas and Schipper aren't uncom-
mon.
YADLOSKY INSPECTED another
bedroom on the floor and then
reached the second floor. Among the
other violations on that floor, he
noted there was no second means of
exit - a serious fire protection
violation. The Ashley house will need
a second enclosed stairway which
occupants can reach without passing
through a private room.
Pappas complained to the inspec-
tor about the long lists of violations
he was compiling and blamed the
poor conditions on the tenants.
"Everything I do here is pay bills,"
she said.
"IF YOU THINK you have bad
tenants," Yadlosky said, "I'll take
you where they got worse ones who
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kick holes in the walls."
After completing inspection of all
the rooms on the second floor,
Yadlosky checked out the third floor.
He found at least a handful of
violations in every room, many of
which present serious safety haz-
ards.
Through the two-hour inspection,
Schipper was the only tenant who
complained to Yadlosky about condi-
tions in the house. Yadlosky ac-
knowledged that the tenants seemed
a bit fearful of him.
"A PROBLEM we have is tenants
who are afraid to say anything,
Yadlosky said. "Tenants call in all
the time with complaints . . . tenants
ask what they can do but they are
afraid to give the name of their
apartment for fear that the landlord
will find out and kick them out."
"It's a frightening thing to have to
leave your house, especially when
you are old," he said.
Yadlosky said if tenants knew their
rights, they would be more likely to
voice their complaints.
"ONE PROBLEM we have in Ann
Arbor is that there are a lot of poor
people who don't know what their
rights are," he said.
Yadlosky returned to his office to
document each violation in the house
according to the city and state
housing code. From a list of viola-
tions four legal-sized pages long, he
sent the owners a completed list,
giving them thirty days to begin
correcting the violations.
The owners will be granted time
extensions to complete repairs if they
begin a major repair effort within the
thirty day period.
WILLIAM HAMPTON, housing
manager for the city community de-
velopment department, will meet
with tenant Patrick and his son
tomorrow morning to begin a reloca-
tion procedure. Hampton said be-
cause of their income, the pair will
likely be eligible for relocation pay-
ments, meaning the city will pay the
difference in rent a tenant has to pay
in a new unit for five months in
addition to moving expenses.
"We've got a hell of a job," Yadlos-
ky said. "Most people don't realize
that. Half of the job is being able to
deal with people.
"I just don't know why we hadn't
gotten over to the Pappas house
earlier."
Wife of
McClellan
declines
his seat
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - The
wife of the late Sen. John McClellan has
declined an offer by Gov. David Pryor
to appoint her to the remaining 13 mon-
ths of the senator's term, Pryor said
yesterday.
McClellan, 81, died in his sleep Mon-
day at His Little Rock apartment. He
was serving his sixth Senate term.
Pryor, who has the duty to appoint a
successor to McClellan for the remain-
der of the term, said he met with Nor-

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