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November 22, 1977 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

full court
PRESS
By CUB SCHWARTZ
JOHNNY ORR opened up Crisler.Arena last night and gave the public its
initial glimpse of what is forthcoming from the Michigan cagers this
season. And while I cannot say it was the best basketball I have ever seen,
it certainly was fun. I think the crowd of about 2,000 would agree.
The occasion was the annual Maize and Blue intra-squad game. Actually
there were two 20 minute games-complete with uniforms, referees, pop-
corn, peanuts and the rest.
Perhaps the main difference between last night's affair and any other
home game was the absence of Johnny Orr from the coaching spot.
He sat up in the stands with the rest of the spectators. And while he is
obviously more than a normal fan, Orr wanted to get a good look at his
team without having to worry about coaching. He left that job to assistant
coaches Frieder, Boyce and Fife.
And just like the rest of us who checked out the cagers, he got a good
look.
On the whole the Wolverines were a little sloppy and not very consis-
tent but very capable of putting the ball through the nets. This really isn't
too surprising since Orr has tauted this year's team as the best \shooting
team he has coached.
Freshman Mc gee may have put on the best performance. Operating at
the forward position on offense the 6-4 freshman poured in 30 points-from
all over the floor. McGee went 13 for 21 from the floor for a very respectable
62%. Orr was impressed.
"I didn't see him miss eight shots," Orr said while reviewing the sta-
tistics. "McGee and Johnson are consistently good shooters. Every scrim-
mage we've had they have shot well."
While McGee nailed more buckets than Johnson, the latter was cer-
tainly impressive. With 12 points in the second game he sparked the Blue
team to victory, even though it took a Staton layup with 33 seconds gone
in a hastily conceived sudden death overtime to seal the victory.
Along with his shooting display from deep in the corners, and some
nifty passing, including a crowd peasing behind-the-back pass to Hardy,
Johnson's defense showed improvement. He blocked five shots and made a
couple of crucial backcourt steals in the late going.
"Everyone has offense and the people with defense will play," Johnson
said earlier in the year. Apparently Johnson wants to play-and Orr is
quite willing to let him.
"I don't know who will start this week," Orr said after the scrim-
mage. But when he was asked whether Johnson had the sixth spot nailed
down he said, "I'd say that's about as bad as he would be."
"He was much better defensively tonight," Orr continued. "He's a good
player."
After the contdst, a little kid shoved a program into Johnson's hand for
an autograph.
"You know who I am?" Johnson asked the admirer.
The youngster groped for words but Johnson said, "Forget it, I'm
Johnny Johnson," and he happily scribbled his name on the program. That
wasn't the only fan Johnson made last night.

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, November 22, 1977-Page 9
UP/ eTvoet

NEW YORK - Southern powers
Kentucky and North Carolina were
chosen as pre-season co-favorites for
the best college basketball team in
the country, according to the United
Press International B o a r d .,,of
Coaches.
"We are better than last yea,'
said Kentucky Coach Joe Hall before
the start of the season. "We desepv.e,
to be ranked high this year,'.."
"I do think we will have another~
good basketball team," said Norh
Carolina Coach Dean Smith." L
1. Kentucky [17]
[tie] North Carolina [16] 5
3. Marquette .[71309
4. Notre Dame 24
5. San Francisco [1] 201,
6. UCLA
7. Purdue 104;
8. Cincinnati19
9. Arkansas [1]
10. Louisville
11. Syracuse
12. MICHIGAN
13. Maryland
14. Wake Forest
[tie] St. John's
16. Indiana St.?2
[tie] Utah 2
18. Kansas St. 16
19. Alabama
20. Holy Cross 3

WITH REBOUNDER SUPREME Phil Hubbard sidelined for an indefinite period by a knee injury, the performance of
Michigan's untested big men will be a crucial factor in the Wolverines cage fortunes for 1977-78. Two candidates for the
center position show their stuff in action from last night's intra-squad game: at left, freshman Mike Robinson pops up a jump
shot; at right, Joel Thompson rips down a rebound.

SPOR TS OF THE DAIL Y

oody
By The Associated Press and Daily Sports
COLUMBUS, Ohio-Ohio State foot-
ball Coach Woody Hayes said last night
he made a mistake in slugging an ABC-
TV cameraman in the waning moments
of the Buckeyes' game at Michigan.
Hayes struck Mike Freedman while
the cameramanwas focusing on the
Ohio State coach's reactions after a
fourth quarter fumble by quarterback
Rod Gerald.
"I'm sorry what I did," Hayes told
the Buckeyes' banquet. "Do I make
mistakes? Hell, I make a lot of them. I
try not to hide my mistakes."
Hayes' incident Saturday came
before more than 106,000 in Michigan

regrets si
Stadium and millions more on
television.
"I'm so damn tired of hearing what I
did to the man out there," said Hayes,
raising his voice. "Sure, I regret what I
did."
Hayes then paraphrased an unnamed
television reporter who said the 64-
year-old Ohio State coach slammed
down his headset when Gerald's fumble
killed Ohio State's last scoring chance
in a 14-6 loss to the Wolverines.
"He's a liar," charged Hayes. "I
didn't have them on. The reporter said I
ran 20 yards to strike that man.
"I did not. I ran to here," said Hayes,
pointing to a spot near the rostrum.
Hayes said of his reaction to the fum-
ble: "I've never been sicker in my life.
I turned and got ready to hit."
Hayes said of Freedman, "Actually, I
like the little guy. He was just doing his
job. He's been around for years. He was
thrown out of Texas Stadium. Yet, the
poor little guy was just trying to do his
job." . .
Rose Bowl ickets
If you want a ticket to the Rose Bowl
but you don't want to spring for the en-
tire student tour, you'll have to wait un-
til Dec. 4, when individual tickets will
go on sale at Crisler Arena.
Meanwhile, tour sales continue today
and tomorrow in the Michigan Union.
The cost of the student tours is $369, and
includes a ticket to the Jan. 2 game. The
faculty/staff tour costs $436 per person.

ide line s,
Kenyan conquers
SPOKANE-Washington State's fast
Kenyan Henry Rono easily won his
second straight NCAA Cross Country
Championship yesterday ahead of 252
Aother runners.
Rono led from the start for an official
time of 28:33.5 on the 10,000 meter cour-
se at Hangman Valley Golf Course
south of Spokane.
Oregon was the official team leader
with 100 points, followed by Texas-El
Paso, last year's winner, with 105.
Next among the 29 teams from 78
schools were Wyoming with 186,
Providence with 205 and Brigham
Young with 235.
Rec Spots
Weigh-in for the IM Wrestling meet

U91
in the residence hall and frateiity.
divisions will take place Monday,"k4
28 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. att
Hoover St. IM Building. The meet will
take place in the Wrestling Room at,7
p.m. that night. ;
CHRISTMAS
ART FAIR
The University of Michigan
Artist & Craftsmen Guild
SATURDAY, DEC. 3
10 a.m.-8 p.m.
SUNDAY, DEC. 4
10a.m.-5 p.m.
U-M Coliseum, Ann Arbor
Fifth Avenue at Hill Street

r

REGIONAL PREMIERE

THE CINEMATIC EVENT OF THE YEAR
TWO SHOWS ONLY
THE BATTLE OF CHILE
Directed by Patricio Guzman;
Produced by the Equipo Tercer
Ano in collaboration with the
Cuban Film Institute and Chris
Marker. A Tricontinental Film
Center Release.A

AWARDS: Grand Prize. Grea-
able Film Festival, 197ยข
French FimlCmritics A.Vocld
tan Award; Grand Prize. 8V,_
na n 4eno internatonatin
Festival, 1976; Grand Prize of w
the international Jury, Leipzg
International Film Festiva
1976.
Wed. Nov. 30
Angell Hall Aud A-
$ P.m.

Tues. Nov. 29
MLB Aud 3
8 p.m.

Tickets for sole
at Fisibowl
10 a.m.-2 p.m. $2.75

Final Big 10 Stan
Conference

MICHIGAN
Ohio State.
Michigan State
Indiana
Minnesota
Purdue
Iowa
Wisconsin
Illinois
Northwestern

7 1 0
4 3 1
4 4 0
3 5 0
3 5 0
6 0
1 8 0

dings
All Games
10 1 0
5 5 1
7 4 0
5 6 0-
5 6 0
5 6 0
1 10 0

CENTRAL CAFE
FEA TURING:
MEXICAN DINNERS
AMERICAN-MEXICAN BREAKFASTS -J
SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS
OPEN 7 AM-Midnight Mon.-Wed., 24 Hours Thurs-Sat., Sundays til 9 PM ,
322 S. MAIN 665-9999

The Russians are coming ^P'''''
Sixteen-year-old Erica Shiller, junior champion of the Soviet Union in modern rhythmic gymnastics, spins her way into the
hearts of her audience during a performance on the current USSR gymnastics team's tour. Rhythmic gymnastics is the latest
innovation in gymnastics and combines many of the latest dance steps with a hoop, ball, or ribbon. Shiller and her teammates,
many of whom have competed in past Olympic Games, will be in Ann Arbor for an exhibition Monday, November 28, at
Crisler Arena.
The University of Michigan Housing Division and LS&A
PILOT PROGRAM/ALICE LLOYD HALL
POSITION OPENING: Resident Advisor-Alice Lloyd Hall
(UNDERGRADUATE WOMEN'S CORRIDOR)
Margot Morrow, Building Director for Pilot Program/Alice Lloyd Hall has announced a Resident
Advisor position opening on a women's corridor for the Winter Term 1978.
Candidates must be enrolled in a graduate degree program. Preference will be given to those
who, in addition to corridor advising, are also able to teach a credit mini-course in the
Winter Semester and/or can co-direct a new Pilot Program field placement project. Full details
are available from the Pilot Program Office, Alice Lloyd Hall, 100 Observatory St., 764-7521.
Margot and the nominating committee will review the applications and resumes and will
contact individuals whose background and experience coincides with the position open to
arrange an interview time.
REMUNERATION: 100% room and board plus a $200.00 stipend

Ii
1 Aj
1 N
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Opryland '78, with 13 fully-staged musical productions featuring over 350 singers, dancers, and other
artists, offers tremendous opportunities to aspiring young talent. Some of our performers have won solo spots
in network and regional TV productions originating from Opryland. Opryland talent has traveled afar to
entertain at more than 260 special events, including the Canadian National Exhibition in Toronto, and the
National Association of Broadcasters Convention in Washington, D.C. Several have received major-label
recording contracts. For all, there's good money, exciting work with a professional staff, exposure to people
who count. Ann Arbor auditions will be held Friday, December 2, 1977, from 12:00-5:00 p.m. at the
University of Michigan, Michigan Union-Assembly Hal. A piano accompanist, record player, tape and
cassette recorder will be available for performers. Conductors/leaders, stage managers, lighting technicians,
sound engineers, stagehands, and follow spot operators should report with typed resume ready for interview.
Non-Equity.

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