100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 20, 1977 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, November 20, 1977-Page 3
)NVENES:

WOMEN'S CONFERENCE C(

L-,F A. 11 T M-j.L Ili" K-o 0

" iYOUJ SEE NES KkTM CALL 6 DN~y

Jordan makes plea

for s

No business like monkey business
Apparently not satisfied with such mundane goings-on as sail-'
ing his motorcycle over the Grand Canyon or a pool of sharks, Evel
Knievel is moving onward - and upward. The daredevil says he's
planning to leap out of a plane at 40,000 feet and plunge parachute-
less into a haystack. Knievel claims he has been offered $20 million
by unnamed backers to pull the stunt in Las Vegas next July 4.

(Continued from Page 1)
not here. Not making a difference is a
cost we cannot afford."
Mrs. Carter, who has carried Presi-
dent Carter's human rights campaign
to South America, said the goal of U.S.
womenis "equal participation."
THERE HAVE BEEN and will be "a
lot of disagreements and conflicts, sh*'
said. "But I agree with my daughter-in
law Judy that we must guard agains
obscuring valid issues with defensive-
ness and anger."
Mrs. Ford said women "must keep
focused on our goals - in business, edu-
cation, employment, politics or in the
home."
She said women can have different
interests, "but we shouldn't be dismay-
ed by the clash of opinions and ideas."
MRS. JOHNSON said, "I once
thought the women's movement
belonged more to my daughters than to
me, but I have come to know that it
belongs to women of all ages."
Dr. Gloria Scott, president of the Na-
tional Girl Scouts, opened the confer-

ence by calling it "the most significant
and far-reaching event in this century
.. We are in passage and our fates are
bound together."
But it was Jordan who brought down
the house with descriptions of the plight
of women. Her fiery brand of Southern
straight-talk inspired delegates to the
Democratic National Convention last
year, when she became the first black
woman ever to keynote the nominating
convention of a major U.S. political
party..
"HUMAN RIGHTS apply equally to
Soviet dissidents, Chilean peasants and
American women," she said.
"When our rights are limited ... when
our rights are violated, we need a do-
mestic human rights program. This
conference could be the beginning of
such an. effort," said the Texas Demo-
crat.
She said delegates should not be
brainwashed by those who predict,
.chaos. "Tell them they lie."
FORMER REP. BELLA Abzug (D-

N.Y.) told the delegates that women
are speaking for themselves these
days.
"And I believe the whole nation will
have to listen to what we say," said Ab-
zug, who chairs the federal commission
sponsoring the conference.
"After this weekend, the whole nation
will know that the women's movement
is not any one organization or set of
ideas or particular lifestyle," she said.
"It is millions of women deciding indi-
vidually and together that we are
determined to move history forward."
LIZ CARPENTER, former press sec-
retary to Mrs. Johnson who is a mem-
ber of the women's commission, spoke
to the diversity of the women repre-
sented at the conference.

lidarty
"Who are 'we the people' gathered
here in Houston? We are the female
people left out in Philadelphia,' " sie
said. "And the irony - the real irony --
is that there would have been no Ameri-
ca without us. So we are here to stake
our claim on its past and its future.'
Carpenter said women have seen
their own dreams shattered and short-
changed, however, by "insecure men
and women fearful of a world of equil-
ity."
"Are we so dangerous? So alien to this
land we have founded? Are we so
threatening? So 'forward' and 'brash'
and 'pushy' to ask for fairness?' " she
asked.
The women roared back a resounding
"No.'

But before he starts mapping
out his jump, Knievel has
some other business to attend
to. First, he said he's going to
customize his body. He's hav-
ing his spleen removed, an op-
eration he figures will help les-
sen his chances of getting kill-
ed, and he's also having a
"homing device" implanted in
his chest to help guide him to
the haystack. Before the jump,
however, Evel will have to ser-
ve out a 60-day jail term for
beating a TV executive with a
baseball batr recently. They
don 't call him Evel, for noth-
ing.

PRESTON STURGES' 1942
SULLIVAN'S TRAVELS
Preston Sturges', a brilliant screenwriter-turned-director and his meteoric
films were the consolation of comedy lovers in the '40's. This one is probably
his most inventive. A successful movie director (of hits like "ANTS IN THEIR
PANTS OF 1931") wants to tackle a serious subject and takes to the roads of
depression America to do research. His troubles are funnier than the'films he
makes. Starring JOEL MC CREA and VERONICA CARE.

I
:'
r
' ..
2'
_ ..
.
,:

S- ................. ....
Daily Offici al Bulletin

Mon: OLYMPIA I & II (free at 7 & 9)
Tues: KWAIDAN (free at 8)

CdTONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
Cinema Guid 7&:0 $1.5

nievel: Reaching
new heights

Happenings...
are zilcho for today ... but MONDAY we transcend zilch-
ness beginning at 9 a.m. when the religious ceremony "Eid-al-Adha"
begins at 407 N. Ingalls ... Everything you've always wanted to know
about the "Biological and Social Analysis of the Turner Sit Population,
S.E. Missouri" is yours at noon when the Anthropology Museum sponsors
a research seminar in 2009 Museums Bldg. ...got the munchies; Then trot
on down to Hillel, 1429 Hill St. and brunch with Med School Assoc. Dean
Robert Green - he'll tell you how to get into medicine ... tap your tootsies
to Israeli dance music at Hillel from 1-3 p.m. ... at 4 p.m. in the Union's
Anderson Room, Robert Holtz from the Confederation Generale des
Petites et Moyenne Enterprises speaks on "Syndicates and the Business
Community in Contemporary Frence" ... there's an Israeli coffeehouse at
Hillel at 5:30 ... and at 7:30 over in the MLB 4th Floor Commons, informed
people will present an information meeting for the Summer Study pro-
grams ... ciao.
On the outside...
It'll be a good day to lie around, sip tea, peruse the newspaper and
just plain recover from yesterday. Skies will be overcast and there's a
good chance of rain with a high of 480 and a low of 37*. As for Monday, it
ought to be turning a little colder with a possibility of rain.

SUNDAYNOVEMBER 20,1977
Day Calendar
Music School: Faculty Chamber Concert,
Rackham Aud., 4 p.m.
Musical Society: Symphony Orchestra of Brazil,
Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1977
Day Calendar
Music School: Composers Forum, SM Recital Hall,
8p.m.
Physics / Astronomy: Dr. K. Johnsop,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, "Spin
Dependent Forces in Charmonium, 2038 Randall, 4
p.m.
* * *
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 SAB - Phone 764-7460
INTERVIEWING ON CAMPUS
Nov. 28, 1977, Oak Ridge National Laboratory -
PhD's: Chemistry, Economics, Geology, Plasma
and Applied Physics, Environmental and Industrial
Health, Natural Resource Ecology.
1977- Tri-State Careers Conference, Dec. 27, 28 -
Evansville, Ind. It's your chance to investigate
career opportunities in the Evansville, Ind. area
while on holiday vacation. No fee. Major area em-
ployers will conduct private interviews with college
seniors. Additional info. available at CP&P.
DOCTORAL DISSERTATION AWARD: The State
Farm Companies award is available to students who
have completed a major portion of their doctoral
program and are majoring in insurance or related
field of study. Fellowships are available to college
students majoring in Acctg:, Bus. Ad.. Acturial Sci.,
Comp. Sci., Econ., Math., Pre-law, Statistics & other
business related subjects.
Columbus Area Careers Conference, Dec. 19-20.
Students graduating by Jan. 31 are invited to inter-
view for a wide variety of occupations with major
employers located in the Columbus, Ohio area. Ad-
ditional information available.

SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB- Phone 763-4117
Psychology Service Minn. VA Hospital, Minn.: Of-
fers comprehensive programs for internships coor-
dinated with training programs. Wide variety of sub-
ject choice. Further details available. Apps. must be
received by Jan. 15.
Oak Ridge National Labs, Tenn.: Grad. seniors
and grad students internships for fields of engineer-
ing, math, environm., physical andsocial sciences.
Apps. must be received by Jan. 16. Further details
available.
Am. Society of Magazine Editors, New York:
Magazine Internship Program for Juniors. Opportu-
nity to work on editorial staff of national mazazine.
Apps. must be received by Dec. 16. Details available.
Wayne County Community College, Det. Work with
Dir. Labor Relations. Gather date for negotiations,
conduct surveys, etc. Student in senior year.
REMINDER: Students interested in the Washing-
ton Center for Learning Alternatives please note the
following return of application dates:
Oct. 15 -Winter quarter '78 program
Nov. 1 -Spring '78 semester programs
Nov. 15- Winter '78 (January) program

Ili MICHIGAN DAILIY
Volume I.XXXVl1l. No. 64
Sunday. Npveanber 20. 1977
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Dual jobs tough
PRINCETON, N.J. (AP) - Very few
college football players do play or can
play both offense and defense. David
Noyes Powers, a defensive back for
Princeton, was asked if he would like to
try.
"I would like to play both ways,"
Powers replied. "But I'm not sure I
ould. Not so much from the physical
stamina point of view but football is so
sophisticated, I'm not sure I could
master two positions. On our team the
offense and defense watch films of
games separately, meet apart at half-
time, and sit apart. They are really two
separate teams. College football has be-
come too sophisticated."
SUNDAY
Music by
WILD BILL
Round Haus Csfe
618 CHURCH
across from the Blue Frogge

econdChanc(t
4 :
4' prCSe1Un "3.
RICK
NELSONE
SSTONE *
4' BAND
Plus the
4' RFD BOYS*
ADVANCE
TICKETSR $ 0
AT DOOR$ :3,.l
+ SUNDAY two shows,
NOV 20th 7and 11p.m.

,V

_ -

* Coord
For new
Knowled
Desirabl
Producers F
IMPROVISAT
THEATE
Shows, I
Job Descrip
At UAC Offi
Applications

inator N
Thea
ge of UM
e. Super
or, MIME
TIONS * C
:R ETC. 3-
ntimate
ption & A
ice, 2nd F
s due 5 P

eeded *
ter Group
Theater
vision of
" DRAMA
HILDREN'S
4 Small
Settings.
ppl ications
Floor Union.
.M., Nov. 28

I.. _____________________________________________________-,

"" .. ... ..............."."......." ........... ".................. . . . . .. .
The No.1 Rock-n-Roll Disco
SUDS FACTORY
737 N. HURON (at Lowell, just east of E.M.U. Campus)
See our NEW, EXPANDED Dynamite Light Show
corning NOV. 22-LIVE
PLAIN & FANCY
see them do a tribute to KISS and ALICE COOPER

Second
" ;
r. - M m - II %

Chance preset
~ am U -mu -- -5

\I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan