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November 17, 1977 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-11-17

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, November 17, 1977-Page 7

Josten's College
Jewelry Representative
Will Re Here For

ERS' APPEAL MAYDELAY HEARINGS:

layoral trial to

By GREGG KRUPA
Monroe County Circuit Court Judge
James Kelley, the presiding judge in
Ann Arbor's continuing mayoral dis-
pute, has set November 23 as the date
for the resumption of court proceedings
in that case. But the suit will probably
not resume that early since attorneys
for two University women who voted
improperly in last April's mayoral elec-
tion are planning an appeal to the
Michigan Supreme Court.
Attorneys for Diane Lazinsky and
Susan VanHattum are seeking to over-
turn an appeals court decision ordering
the two women to reveal their votes be-
cause they had been improperly reg-
istered. -
JUDGE KELLEY'S move yesterday
was a response to a letter from Coun-

cilman Louis Belcher's attorney, Rob-
ert Henry. Belcher was Mayor Albert
Wheeler's Republican challenger in
April. Henry asked the judge to s'It a
trial date so the opposing attorneys
would move quickly in making their
appeal.
It was because of Henry's line of
questioning that the trial - now in its
.seventh month - was interrupted in
October. Henry cited two precedents
for requiring 20 voters who had been
registered improperly to reveal their
votes. Three voters complied with the
court order, but the two women re-'
fused. VanHattum was cited for con-
tempt and handcuffed.
The next day Kelley decided to delay
the , trial to allow an appeal to the
Michigan Court of Appeals.
EDWARD GOLDMAN, an American

resume.
Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) lawyer
whois representing Lazinsky, said he is
still working on the appeal. "The appli-
cation for leave to appeal has already
been written. If I get the brief written
and typed tonight, I'll file it Thursday
or Friday," he said yesterday.
The state supreme court must grant
the motion for leavestoappeal before
actually hearing the case. Once a mo-
tion is filed, it usually takes the court
three or four months just to decide
whether or not to hear the case.
However, one attorney said, the court
may hear the motions on an emergency

Nov. 23
basis "because of the time pressures
which are inherent in this type of case."
Mayor Albert Wheeler has already
served seven months of his elected
term. If the state supreme court does
not speed up the normal appeals
process, Wheeler will have served fully
one-half of the two-year term by the
time the appeal is heard.
In addition, attorneys representing
the two women have said they may ap-
peal the case to the United States
Supreme Court if the state Supreme
Court does not hand down a favorable
decision.

GEO maps strategy

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY
PRESENTS
PROFESSOR JULIUS SENSAT
The University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee
"Marx and Habermas on Historical Progress"
DATE: Friday, 18 November, 1977
TIME: 8:00 P.M.
place; AMPHITHEATRE
RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES

" White gdld
" encrustings

" full name engraved
" sunburst stones

(Continued fromnPage 1)
The committee proposed bargain-
ing for specific limits on class size for
each type of class. The limits would
be based on a warning figure that can
be exceeded with the TA's permis-
sion, and an absolute maximum not
to be exceeded under any circum-
stances.
DISCUSSION and recitation see-
ions would have a warning figure of
19 students and a maximum of 24.
The warning number for labs would
xbe 20, with a maximum of 24. Some
classes, primarily in 'the math de-
partment, would be allowed a warn-
ing figure of 25 and a maximum of 30.
Also, the number of teaching ap-
Regrets
Vhuckles
fill Dean's
speech
(Continued from Page 1)
without breaking'his rhythm.
Dean admitted his guilt in the
Watergate affair, saying: "Those
were the worst years of my life. I
can't exactly point to when I crossed
that line (marking right from wrong)
but I know I crossed it. I wanted to
prove myself.
"BUT I WASN'T in a position to go
into the Oval Office and say, 'Listen
Dick, this doesn't go any more -
you're President now'," he said.
Dean said when he went to the
prosecutors to tell all he knew of
Watergate, he didn't think he would
topple the Nixon administration.
"1 thought-if I came forward that
others would follow. That happened to
be one of the most naive judgments I
have ever made. When I went to the
prosecutors, there wasn't exactly a line
following me."
DEAN ALSO said he was "absolutely
certain that there is something terribly
Wrong with our justice system" when a
young person can be sentenced to
prison for ten years for possession of
marijuana "when I only got four mon-
ths for what I've done.
Dean said the Watergate-related in-
telligence campaign began in a memo
from Richard Nixon to H. R. Haldeman
in May 1971.
"Task forces were studying every
detail of the campaign," Dean recalled.
'The night Nixon finished reading them
all, he noticed a conspicuous report
missing, one on campaign intelligence.
He told Haldeman, 'I want a far better
intelligence program than we had in
'6&.' Once that memo was sent, things
started happening."
DEAN SAID the man picked to lead
the espionage effort, G. Gordon Liddy,
did not turn out to be the man the Nixon
administration originally believed him
to be.
"Liddy had plans that were in-
credible. He planned chase games in-
tercepting ground-to-air com-
munication against Canada. He had
plans to form prostitution squads en-
ticing Democrats from their convention
in Miami to posh boats off the coast.
They were to be hookers from
Baltimore-he claimed they were the
best," Dean said.
Dean was in Ann Arbor as part of
speaking tour of college campuses. He
whisked into Ann Arbor by cab a few
minutes before the engagement began

and left in another taxi immediately af-
terwards, having received about $1600
for his short talk.

pointments would relate proportion-
ately to undergraduate enrollment.
The union also discussed an af-
firmative action/non-discrimination
proposal that would call for a study to
determine if minorities and women
are being hired less often than other
applicants. If a deficiency is found,
the proposal demands a "good faith
effort" to correct it.

DATE: Thursday and Friday - Nov. 17-18
TIME: 11:00 to 4:00
PLACE: Michigan Union Main Lobby

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