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November 12, 1977 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-11-12

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Page 2-Saturday, November 12, 1977-The Michigan Daily
e
Church Woershj Services
- --'- ---I- e~- -

Chinese intellectualism
surfaces with shift to
more moderate policies

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
State at Huron and Washington
" .Dr. Donald B. Strobe
the Rev. Fred B. Maitland
:"The Rev. E. Jack Lemon
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00.
( ChurchSchoolat9:00and 11:00.
Adult Enrichment at'10:00.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
W. Thomas Shomaker,
Chaplain/Director'
Extensive programming for under-
grads and grad students.
tUNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
.Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
* * *
ANN ARBOR CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
( one block west of U of M Stadium)
Bible Study-Sunday 9:30 a.m.;
Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m. and
6:00 p.mq.
Need transportation? Call 662-9928

CAMPUS CHAPEL-A Campus
Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Church
1236 Washtenaw Ct.--668-7421
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10:00 a.m.-Service of Holy Baptism.
6 p.m.-"Creation and Providence."
AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER AND r
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron-663-9376
0. Carroll Arnold, Minister
Ronald E. Cary, Minister
Worship-10 a.m.; Bible Study-11
a.m.
Fellowship Meeting-Wednesday at
7:45 p.m.
* * *
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Student Foundation)
218 N. Division
665-0606
Chaplain: Rev. Andrew Foster
Sunday Eucharist at noon.
* + *
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice, Ministers
10 a.m.-Morning Service.
5 p.m.-Informal Worship.

LORD OF LIGHT
LUTHERAN CHURCH
(the campus ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801S5. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study-"Revelation"-
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Fellowship Supper - 6:00.
p.m.
Program-7:00 p.m.-(Topic: Ethics
of Homosexuality).
Monday Bible Study-"The First
Prophets"-7:30 p.m.
Thursday Evening Bible Study on
North Campus.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thomson-663-0557'
Weekend Masses':
Saturday- p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m,, noon, and 5 p.m.
* * *
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
608 E. William, corner of State
Worship Service-10:30 a.m:
Sunday Morning Worship-10 a.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Services and Sunday Schoo
-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meeting-8:0(
P.m.
Child Care Sunday-under 2 years.
Reading Room-306 E. Liberty, 10-5
Monday-Saturday; closed Sundays.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at the Ann Arbor Y,
530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transportation
663-3233 or 426-3808.
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
662-4466
Sunday:
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship.
12;00-Coffee Hour.
4:00 p.m.-Undergraduate Fellow-
ship and Supper.
Tuesday-3:30 p.m.-Bonhoffer Sem-
inar.
* * *

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Co*nthoro
ANNOUNCES ITS
i t
Riennial
Pre -Christmas 1Sale
Sunday, Nov. 13 Only-noon to 8 p.m.
SAVE 25% and more on
Selected Hardcovers
including:
How to Save Your Own Life by E. Jong Life Goes to War
Chagall's Daphnis and Chloe The Kitchen Book
Kenneth Clark's Animals and Men Origins by Leakey
the Public Burning all Bibles
Beggarman Thief by Irwin Shaw Dynasty.
Edmund Wilson Letters r Abrams Rube
Exotic Plant Manual
Essays of E. B. White
SAVE at least 10% on ALL hardcovers
SAVE up to 2b% on Rand McNally globes'
See our selection of over 120 Calendars
ONE DAY ONLY
Conticore Bookshops
336 MAYNARD OPPOSITE Nickels Arcade

TOKYO (AP) - After years in the
dog house, China's intellectuals have
been brought back into the front
parlor. They have been encouraged
to conduct scientific research, read
Shakespeare and Balzac and now
have been given pay raises.
Teachers, scientific and technical
workers, medical workers and liter-;
ary and art workers make up the
majority of categories benefitting
from salary increases effective Oct.
1.
THE OTHER, perhaps more nu-
merous categories, include industrial
workers, those in commercial and
service trades and government civil
servants.
The chief beneficiaries, according
to an official Hsinhua news agency
report yesterday, are workers with
many years of experience receiving
less than $45 a month. Forty-six per
cent of the entire work force of about
120 million is affected.
The fatter salary checks are part of
the incentive package worked out by
the new moderate leadership in
Peking to get the country moving in
high gear toward industrialization.
The deadline is the year 2000.
LESS INTANGIBLE, but possibly
more important in the long run, is the
incentive to knuckle down to the job
in a somewhat freer society.
For years, Chinese of all classes
have lived and worked within a
straitjacket of rigid controls. Their
everyday actions even t h e i r
thoughts, have been relentlessly
monitored by the Communist Party.
They have been told what to do, how
to do it and when.
The process has been uneven. It
was eased for a while in the
mid-1950s, at the start of the first big
industrialization effort, but has re-
mained generally consistent in the
long run.
AUTHORITARIAN rule reached a
climax in the 1966-69 Cultural Revolu-
tion when the party's radicals, led by
the late Chairman Mao Tse-tung's
wife, Chiang Ching, gained ascen-
dancy in the"fields of culture and
propaganda. Then, and in the years

that followed, they decided what
should be read and done and what not
to read and do.
Wedded to the radical idea of
revolution, they went to the extreme
of exhorting workers and intellec-
tuals to rebel, to refuse even the most
reasonable kind of authority. The re-
sult was chaos in the economy''and a
stifling of the arts and education.
In recent weeks, the moderates -
inspired by the late Premier Chou
En-lai and his disciple, the twice-
resurrected vice premier, Teng
Hsiao-ping - have widened the op-
portunities for education, revived
pure research in the natural sci-
ences, and struck off the shackles
that imprisoned Chinese culture.
THE CHINESE soon will have the
long-denied opportunity to enjoy once
more the poems, essays, novels and
masterpieces of writers w h o
emergedcafter the 1919 literary
renaissance. Most have been banned

for political reasons in recent years.
In addition, state publishing auth-
orities have announced new editions
of classical literature, poetry, paint-
ing and music, from the sixth century
onward, are to be issued this year.
The state publishing house also is
raising the window to let in foreign
literature, music and art, including
the works of Shakespeare, Heine,
Gogol, Balzac and Hugo, stories of

Chiang Ching
Greek mythology, the piano composi-
tions of Beethoven, Chopin and Bach,
and drawings of Rembrandt.
Only four years ago, Western
composers were derided as bearers
of rotten bourgeois culture. Until now
no Western works-of fiction have ap-
peared on library or bookstore
shelves with the possible exception of
those of Jack London and Mark
Twain, both regarded as suitably
progressive
Hsinhua said the new trend is not
liberalism in the Western sense but
"a diversity of themes and forms.!

Chou En-Lai

en

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (L MS ), :
.1511 Wasltenaw Ave.--63-5$0
;Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Services at 9:15 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship Wednesday, 10:00
p.m.
SHEEPSKIN COATS
oad VEST
For Men, Women and Children
NOW 50% OFF
2PesE.n Hbuse
of Imparis
320 E. Liberty

i
Bankerhints end .to
S. Arica investment,
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa investors, bue t ir wingfeelin
(AP) - A Swiss banker,. warned that the country is a bad risk.
South Africa yesterday that foreign Studer said investors believed it
investments might dry up because of was unlikely the West would agree to
fear that the government's 'policies an economic embargo against Pre-
could lead to "revolution, civil or toria.
underground warfare." "On the other hand, serious con,
He spoke as South Africa's white- cern continues to exist that South
minority government assumed war- Africa's policy of apaitheid racial
time powers to force any company separation could produce revolution,
operating in South Africa to produce civil or underground warfare and
strategic and military goods on even open war between East and
demand. The move was seen as a West," he said.
response to the internationals arms

GET MOVING,
AMERICA!

embargo against South Africa or-
dered by the U.N. Security Council.
ADDRESSING t h e Financial
Mail's annual investment confer-
ence, Robert Studer of the Union
Bank of Switzerland said it wasn't
South Africa's policy of racial segre-
gation that would deter foreign

- There.is
--something

STUDER ADDED, "The very exis-
tence of these incalculable risks may
bring it about that the flow of foreign
capital to South Africa . . . will de-
cline in the future or dry up com-
pletely.,"
An American banker who asked
not to be identified said many
Western bankers ,have ordered a
review of their loans to South Africa
in the wake of protests, arrests and
crackdowns that followed the Sept. 12
prison death of black national leader
Steve Biko.
The banker said that long-term
capital available to South Africa has
been decreasing steadily since 1974
and the trend was accelerated after
rioting in Soweto last year.
"MOST BANKS will not lend
money for more than a year and if
they do the premiums will be high,"
he said.
South Africa currently needs for-
eign funds for several big projects,
including a uranium enrichment
plant, expansioln of a plant that
drives oil from coal and additional
railroad, electric and harbor facili-
ties.
In the past, South Africa was a
favorite among international invest-
ors because of the high rate of return.
According to the U.S. Commerce De-
partment, the average rate on U.S.
investments in South Africa in 1974
was 19.1 per cent, compared with a
world average of 11 per cent.
CRITICS OF apartheid maintain
the high return is possible only
because of the low wages paid to
blacks.
South Africa's official Gazette
published a proclamation that the
government was assuming on Friday
powers that enable it to draw on
foreign or domestic companies in
South Africa for any strategic or

4 in

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