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November 08, 1977 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,. ,

LSA to cut enrollment by 500

The Michigan Doily-Tuesday, November 8, 1977-Page 9
iU

EARN EXTRA CASH
CASH PAID FOR YOUR BLOOD PLASMA NOW
This is your opportunity to help supply this need for blood plasma
EXTRA CASH BONUSES-Prizes given weekly

$

(Continuedfrom Page 1)
combat these trends?" Frye.asked. "It
becomes a question of size versus
quality, and it is my conclusion that
quality has to be the controlling fac-
tor."
THE DECLINE in enrollment must
be accepted, Frye told. the faculty;
recruitment of quality students must be
stepped up at the same time. The dean
said he also plans to increase the pro-
portion of outstate students in LSA to
create new tuition income, which will
allow the college to hire new junior
faculty members. He announced plans
to .reduce the number of sophomore
transfer students by about 50 this win-
ter and next fall.
The LSA faculty also heard from

University Vice-President for Acadepm-promising anvthing."

vlil t trl Vif. R 1\r6. 1 U\7.luLii4 lva [1 ..GiuGi11 (./1 V11110111S ally 411111fj. ,

ic Affairs Harold Shapiro, who outlined
plans for enhancing the educational ex- SHAPIRO reiterate
perience of underclass students and recent pronouncemen

d the University's
nts about improv-

.w. . ..x...,nvamr..aasYUxsmvactaw._4xax+. :xa: aax":AwYvm aGLYit4]au:.:o:.wx5:savn .1. .tns5v

Should ;we go lower in the pool to combat
these trendsIt becomes a question of size
versus quality, and it is my conclusion that
quality has to be the .controlling factor.'
-LSA Dean Bill Fr e
. "'. + .%\ e " .? " ::;: " .i '.e ": v .k.,"?: ?

gave anoptimistic budget forecast for
the coming year.
"An increase in budget looks
promising," said Shapiro. "But I'm not

ing the lot of freshpeople and sopho-
mores, and suggested freshperson
seminars as a possible solution.
"There should also be more interac-

tion of students with their instructors on
a personal basis," Shapiro said. "We
must pay attention to the freshman and
sophomore experience to indirectly
help enrollment all the while."
The vice-president also presented his
plans for establishing a ''flexiblefund,'
derived from taxing the University
budgets to be reallocated "for new pro-
grams or for anything we think is im-
portant."
No final decisions have been made on
the plan yet, Shapiro said, since the
proposal must still go through the
University's budget priorities commit-
tee and budget administrators.
"It will be studied carefully for the
first time very soon," he said.
The Charles Barid Carillon at the
University, the third heaviest carillon
in the world, marked its 40th anniver-
sary in December 1976.
The University established the
nation's first department of intramural
sports in 1912.

IL

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Pftwft

Browne hi
(Continued from Page 1)
paign manager Dennis Archer said
yesterday that the Young organiza-
tion isn't resting on the mayor's 55
per cent showing in the September
primary.
"We are energized," Archer said.
"We are conducting this campaign
like we had gotten 20 per cent coming
out of the primary." He predicted a
Young victory "between 60 and 67
per cent."
Browne. campaign manager Ulys-
ses Hammond gives his candidate at
least a 53 per cent victory margin,
but cautions that "turnout is the
key."

3I

'oks to topp
considering running for the U.S.
Senate.,
The Council race also includes a
contest for Levin's Council presiden-
cy. The top vote-getter automatically,
becomes president, the second most
powerful post in Detroit city govern-
ment.
COMPETING for the vacant seats
are candidates who range from a
Marxist attorney to an agent with the
United States Treasury, to a former
Wayne State University basketball
star. k
The September primary narrowed
the field of candidates from 80 to 18.
All the incumbents finished in the top
nine, along with radical black attor-
ney Kenneth Cockrel, the Marxist
lawyer who successfully defended
Madeline Fletcher, a Flint police offi-
cer accused of shooting her partner.
Cockrel finished seventh in the
primary, ahead of one incumbent,
former Detroit Tiger shortstop Billy
Rogell, who traditionally doesn't
campaign. Cockrel is considered a

le Young
front-runner despite being shunned
by both major newspapers and by the
influential UAW.
ALSO finishing in the top nine was
Anthony Wierzbicki, a former coun-
cilman who gave up his seat for: a
stint as a city accountant.
If the election follows the primary
pattern, Councilwoman Erma Hen-
derson will follow Levin to the
presidency as the top vote-getter,
giving Detroit for the first time a
black at the head of both the
executive and the legislative branch-
es. Also in the running for the
presidency is Councilman Nicholas
Hood, the president pro-tem and
second place vote-getter to Hender-
son.
Retiring President- Levin, how-
ever, won the presidency in 1973 after
coming in third in the primary. If
that tradition holds, the top spot will
go to Councilwoman Maryann Ma-
haffey, a white liberal.

Join the Daily's
Arts Department
Phone 764-0552

BUT SINCE many Detroiters con-
sider the mayoral race already de-
cided, the contest for Detroit City
C uncil has taken on added signifi-
cance.
Seven incumbents are seeking
re-election to the nine-member coun-
cil, and - since incumbents lose
infrequently - thb real race is for the
seats left vacant by Browne and
Council President Carl Levin, who is

0
The DAILY'S
PHONE NUMBERS:
Billing 764-0550
Circulation 764-0558
Classifieds 764-0557
Display 764-0554
News & Happenings
764-0552
Sports 764-0562

v

Liquid protein can be
hazardous, even deadly

(Continued from Page 1)
tinues to stock the liquid protein
product, however, and to sell it without
a prescription.
"It doesn't provide roughage for the
bowels, and the directions don't explic-
itly state the need for water," said Mar-
tin Citz at Food and Drug Mart. But
Food and Drug still carried the diet
substance.
Mickey Mendell of Mendell's Phar-
macy warned against using the diet
without a prescription - yet Mendell's
has not withdrawn its stock of the pro-
duct from its shelves.
CATHI TRIBUNE, a home economist
for Detroit Weight Watchers, says her
organization views the diet with
suspicion.
"Almost all our members have tried
fast-dieting methods without success,"
she said. "With the fast way, you don't
learn anything except how to starve
yourself."
One person who has tried the liquid

protein diet under a doctor's super-
vision disagreed.
"I had tried other diets to limit what I
ate, but none worked," said Joe Dorey
of South Lyon. "I found it easier to just
not eat."
Dorey's'doctor, however, insisted on
checkups with complete blood tests
every two weeks. He also made Dorey
go off the diet for three days after being
on it for two weeks. Dorey lost 30 poun-

ds in eight weeks, but his doctor refused
to be identified.
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