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November 08, 1977 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-11-08

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a
S-
**
The Navy is atively recruiting B.S.N. and 3 year
diploma program graduates. For informatioh, contact
your Nurse Programs Officer at (313) 226-7795 or 226-
7845.
Nursing+Adventure NAVY

Page 2--Tuesday, November 8, 1977-The Michigan Daily
Breeder reactor veto may stand

WASHINGTON (AP) - Congress
is likely to sustain President Carter's
veto of a bill authorizing $80 million
for the Clinch River breeder reactor,
congressional sources said yester-
day;
But the veto, Carter's first since
taking office, may not be sufficient to
kill the multi-billion dollar project at
Oak Ridge, Tenn., its backers
claimed.
They noted that the President may
have to take further action, possibly
including a veto of a second bill, to
scuttle the program entirely.
THAT'S BECAUSE Congress is
expected to send Carter another bill
later this month appropriating the
$80 million for the breeder along with
nearly $7 billion for a variety of other
major federal programs.
Critics of the breeder have urged
Carter to veto this bill, too. But to do
so would jeopardize the many other
programs in the bill, including a
measure carrying out the President's
decision to halt production of the Bi
bomber.
In his Saturday veto message,

*'

Carter claimed the Clinch River proj-
ect, on which ground has yet to be
broken, jeopardized his administra-
tion's intention to curb the spread of
nuclear weapons technology.
BREEDER REACTORS trans-
form small quantities of conventional
nuclear fuels - usually uranium -
into large' amounts of plutonium.
This plutonium then can be used in
other reactors to produce electricity
but may be used to fashion crude
nuclear weapons.
Even breeder supporters acknowl-
edged yesterday that it appears
unlikely they can muster the two--
thirds vote in both House and Senate
needed to overturn Carter's veto.
"It would be very difficult," said
Sen. James Sasser (D-Tenn.) "At
this juncture, we haven't decided
what our strategy will be, whether
we will even push for the veto
message to be taken up."
THIRTY-EIGHT senators and 162
House members voted previously
against the project - a big enough
margin to sustain the veto in either,
chamber.

In a related development, the U.S.
Supreme Court agreed yesterday to
decide whether power plant opera-
tors may ever be sued for more than
$560 million in case of a nuclear
accident.
The justices said they will review a
decision by a federal judge in North
Carolina that the liability ceiling ap-
proved by Congress is unconstitu-
tional.
CONGRESS PASSED the Price
Anderson Act in 1957 to help encour-
age private development of nuclear
energy. Several amendments to the
original legislation have upped the
maximum amount of liability facing
nuclear plant owners for a major nu-

clear accident or catastrophe.
U.S. District Judge James McMil-
lan ruled last March that such a limit
denies persons who might be injured
in such a "nuclear incident" their
right to due process and equal pro-
tection of the law.
Justice Department attorneys, ap-
pealing McMillan's ruling for the
federal Nuclear Regulatory Commis-
sion, said it "could stand as a major
impediment to further private devel-
opment of nuclear energy in this
nation."
Because available insurance is in-
adequate, the government said, pow-
er companies would not build plants
if confronted with unlimited liability.

YOU MEA N
BILL KENNY,
ANN ARBOR 'S
FAVORITE
SHOEMAN,
THE SAME. .

H EY F E ET,
HOLAD UP
WK-ERE ARE
WE GOING'?a
THE CAMPUS
BILLS BACK.
GR E AT
ArN D AL L
T H IS W EE K
15 T H E 00

Oil price hike likely
at OPEC conference

Mm6k,

r

MARSHALL'S
8 Pack'
12 oz. cans

-'9

CA MP US.OOT E RY
OFF ON T HE ENTIRE STOCK!l
PLUS A CHANCE TO IN coo
BOOTS - SHOES,- SANDALS " CLOCGS
FEET E\VERYWdHERE ARE INVITED Qo .a.

$1.69

1I.I
Now thru Sunday

VIENNA, Austria (AP) - The
economic commission of the Organi-
zation of Petroleum Exporting Coun-
tries (OPEC) met here yesterday to
prepare for a ministerial meeting
next month at which the cartel is
expected to again raise the price of
oil, probably by five per cent.
The meeting opened as the authori-
tative Middle East Economic Survey
(MEES) reported "there is no hope"
that the oil exporters will h'eed U.S.
calls for an oil price freeze through
1978.
The oil newsletter said that even
Saudi Arabia, "the most moderate of
the moderates," has declared that
some increase is justified. The
Saudis have led efforts to keep down
the price of oil at recent OPEC
confereces.
THE BASIC price of oil is currently
$12.70 a barrel. Oil ministers of the
13-nation OPEC will be meeting in
Caracas,Venezuela, on Dee. 20 to
decide its prices for .1978 and to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY.
Volume LXXXVIII, No. 53
TuesdayNovember 8,1977
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
LETU.S HELP YQU PLAN.
A HEA'D ToBECOME'A CPA '
Detroit 313-542-1666.
Grand Rapids 616-454-0909
OU UCSFU TDNS.ERSN

discuss future production levels.
A five per cent increase in the price
of crude would mean an increase of
about 11 cents a gallon at American
pumps. The United States imports
about 40 per cent of its oil from OPEC
Members.
OPEC spokesman Hamid Zaheri
said a review of oil prices was one of
the topics to be discussed at the
week-long preparatory meeting here.
The meeting is being held behind
closed doors.
THE ECONOMIC commission is
only an' advisory body. But it is
expected to - compile evidence that
the sagging dollar and the swelling
cost of imports from industrialized
countries is eating into OPEC oil
,revenues.
The reports of an impending price
hike contrasted with a statement
Sunday by Treasury Secretary Mi-
chael Blumenthal, who said after
returning from visits to Saudi Ara-
bia, Iran and Kuwait that he thought
there was a chance OPEC would not
raise prices for some time.
BDaily Off icial
The Daily Official Bulletin is an official publication
of the University of Michigan. Notices should bg sent
in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to 409 E. Jefferson, be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceeding publication and by 2
.p gm' ='Friday .Ior"Saturday, Sunday1.5and Monday,
Items appgarronce only. $tudent organization notices
are not accepted for publication. For more informa:
'oil, phon' i644Ry0.
Tuesday, November 8, 1977
Day Calendar
Physics/Astronomy: W. Hazen, "The Leeds Cos
mic Ray Experiment," 2038 Randall Lab., 4 p.m.
Classical Studies/Near Eastern Studies/Kelsey
Museum: zahi A. Hawwass, First Inspector of
Antiquities at the Giza Pyramids, "The Excavatior
at Kom Abou Bellou," 203 Tappan Hall, 4:10 p.m.
Music School: Philharmonia, Hill, 8 p.m.
Musical Society: Victoria de los Angeles, Rack,
ham Aud., 8:30 p.m.

3'ff

S STATE

STREET,- ANN ARBOR

235 S. STATE AT E. LIBERTY

1i .~11

Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra
Edo de Waart, Conductor
with The Festival Chorus
Elizabeth Mosher, soprano;
Raeder Anderson, baritone
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, AT 8:30 IN HILL AUDITORIUM
Credited with many impressive achievements both at home and abroad,
this fine orchestra and its dynamic young conductor, Edo de Waart, are
both making their Ann Arbor debuts Friday evening. Our 125-voice Fes-
tival Chorus, prepared by Donald Bryant, joins forces with yet another
top rank orchestra for a portion of Friday's program:
DIEPENBROCK: Excerpts from "Marsyas"
DVORAK: Te Deum for Chorus, Orchestra, and Soloists
MAHLER: Symphony No. 1
Trainre nirnilnahh frm. T4to In it

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
UPJOHN BEGINS WITH YOU
Representatives from The Upjohn Company will be on
campus Wednesday, November 16 to interview in the
following areas.
CHEMISTRY. B.S.-M.S. chemists for positions as cheris-
try laboratory assistants and laboratory analysts.
BIOLOGY. B.S.-M.S. biology-microbiology majors for po-
sitions as lab assistants or lab analysts. Ph.D. level micro-
biologists-molecular biologists-geneticists for future re-
search scientific openings.
PHARMACY. B.S.-M.S. pharmacists for bench oriented re-
search positions.
ENGINEERING. B.S. electrical, mechanical and chemical
engineers for entry level project engineering slots. BS.-
M.S.-Ph.D. chemical engineers for research and process
design work. M.S. industrial engineers.
BUSINESS. MBAs for employee relations, marketing re-
search and operations research (quantitative analysis).
Accounting & Finance majors for placement on the ac-
counting & finance Professional Development Program.
Why interview with Upjohn?
The Upjohn Company is an employee-oriented phar-
maceutical-chemical' firm with corporate-research-pro-
duction headquarters in Kalamazoo, Michigan and with
various other chemical, pharmaceutical, agricultural and
laboratory operations throughout the U.S. All Upjohn
businesses fall under an umbrella of improving the quali-
ty of life for humanity.
Research is given a top priority (with nine percent of
sales, or $92,565,000 being reinvested in Research & De-
velopment in 1976). Our efforts in such areas as Infec-
tious Diseases, CNS, Diabetes & Atherosclerosis, Hyper-
sensitivity Diseases, Fertility Research and Card iovas-
cular Diseases are resulting in extensive product lines
and exciting new product potential.
We have over 6,000 employees working in Kalamazoo
and another 6,000 or so working at other U.S. sites. A
great many of these are professional specialists, thus af-
fording a stimulating atmosphere for work and growth in
a multi-disciplined environment. And although we are fair-
ly large, our internal job posting system, rotational train-
ing programs (in some areas), and tiered career paths en-
hance mobility and growth potential.
Upjohn offers excellent salaries and a comprehensive

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