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September 09, 1977 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-09

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i

WELCOME
See Editorial Page

SirP

tti

OMINOUS
See Today for Details

Vol. LXXXVIII, No. 2 Ann Arbor, Michigan-Friday, September 9, 1977 Free Issue Twenty-Eight Pages

When in Ann Arbor, say

as the New

Yorkers say

By MIKE NORTON
Nobody knows how long it's been
shere - or if they do, they're not
spilling. But there it stands, plain as
anything, on the well-traveled corner
of State St. and North University
Ave.
It's a street sign erected by the
literate city of Ann Arbor, and the
word "university" - probably the
most often-used word in town - has
been misspelled. The "r" is missing.
"IT'S DAMNED embarrassing, is
what it is," gasped one elderly
woman as she passed the sign. "What
are all these new students going to,

think? What kind of example are we
setting?"
LSA Junior Mike Sinclair said he
first noticed the misspelled sign last
week, but doesn't know how long it's
been that way.
"Maybe they did it that way for
New Yorkers," he said. "They
always pronounce it 'univesity' any-
way."
"I guess it takes an idiot like me to
spot it," laughed Sinclair, who was
the first person to point out the
erroneous sign language.
ART KUENDET, sign shop super-

.v
visor for the city, said he has no idea
how long the embarrassing sign has
been standing. "They go up and come
down again just as fast as we can
4make them," he said. "People seem
to think tney make real good sou-
venirs."
Kuendet said he plans to have the
sign checked out and replaced. But
by then, of course, the damage will
already have been done: a whole
crop of freshfolk will be misspelling
"univesity" for the rest of their
blighted lives.

..
0
. , iTS
i
' ABOUT
Ti ME .
WS DAMNED
EMBARRASSING
O b

l
K
yd
9

1 t/ < OPJ Y 4'} ais t'7 "" t1 7 s t 7 ws . t " N _i< " ' is f ' 1 _1

16

_ .

University

housing

chief

resigns

I

Lawsuit
uts City
paychecks
in check
By GREGG KRUPA
The mail carrier delivered a
dubious reward to City Council.
members last Friday. Enclosed in
the city-issued envelopes were the
first batch of paychecks ever allotted
councilpersons for their services.
Attached to the paychecks were
notes warning that the money should
not be spent.;
City Administrator §ylvester Mur-
ray _issued the defla notice be-
cause of a lawsuit contesting pay for
City Council members. Local attor-
ney John Laird, a former Republican
councilman, has filed the suit and
claims he will take the case to the
state Supreme Court.
The suit is the latest twist in a
partisan debate that has divided
Council members for several years.
REPUBLICANS have generally
maintained that monetary compen-
sation for city officials would attract
an unsavory breed of politician - one
seeking office to promote a political
career rather than seeking to per-
form a public service.
Democrats, however, have argued
that the small salaries would encour-
age Council members to spend the
proper amount of time doing the job
they were elected to do.
The $5,000 salaries were approved
by the City 'Compensation Commis-
sion in 1975, despite a city charter
provision prohibiting compensation
for Council members.,
A circuit court judge then ruled
that salaries for Council members
were in direct violation of the charter
provision, irregardless of state law,
but last month an appeals court
judge found that the state statute
establishing compensation Fommis-
-sions superceded local provisions.
THE JUDGE referred to the
wording of the state legislation,
See COUNCIL, Page 8
rMUSEE SLticMW
See Page 3
-. . . . . .......... . ;........

Feldkamp will assume
duties at Princeton

Daily Photo by CHRISTINA SCHNEIDER
GREG HESTERBERG, TREASURER of the newly formed Coalition for Better Housing, passes out information
concerning the "tent-in" being staged on the lawn of the Student Activities Building. Students are pitching tents
outside the Maynard Street building to dramatize the housing shortage for students.
It ain't Mosher-Jordan,
but it's ho-me lfor a whil

By SUE WARNER
University Housing Director
John Feldkamp, the person
with perhaps more day-to-day
influence on undergraduates
than any other top administra-
tor, will leave the University
next week to become general
manager of services at Prince-
ton.
Feldkamp has been director
of housing since 1966.
Henry Johnson, University
vice-president for student ser-
vices, has named Associate
Housing Director Robert
Hughes acting director of the
office until a permanent
replacement is selected.
JOHNSON '$AID yesterday
he will appoint a director within
a year. He did not indicate
whether he will make Hughes'
appointment permanent or go
through the process of forming
a search committee to select
Feldkamp's successor.
"John Feldkamp has, done a com-
mendable job here at Michigan and
we're sad to see him leave. But I under-
stand that people need to seek out new
experiences," Johnson said.
In his new post, Feldkamp will
supervise, Priceton's food and building
service departments, office of special
events, and faculty, staff and student
housing.
"I'm excited about the new job,"
Feldkamp said, "but there are very
mhixed emotions. I'll be sad to leave Ann
Arbor."
Feldkamp's tenure as housing direc-
tor has spanned a curious period in the
University's history. The sixties
brought considerable expansion in the
student body and University facilities,
while the Seventies witnessed stringent
cutbacks.
Feldkamp's housing office frequently
found itself at the center of controver-
sies concerning overflowing dormi-
tories and spiraling rent rates. As if to
offer a going-away salute to the resign-
ing housing director, University stu-
dents have staged a protest outside of
the Student Activities Building de-
manding aditional housing for the
lodging-cramped community.
FELDKAMP, HOWEVER, has stead-
fastly advocated making do with ex-
isting facilities. He has said the penny-
pinched University cannot afford to
build new housing.
He received both his undergraduate
and law degrees from the University
and joined the administrative staff in
1962 as assistant to the director of stu-
dent activities and organizations.

In addition to his work at the Uni-
versity Feldkamp has been very active
in the Ann Arbor community. Since 1975
he has been a hearing referee for the
Michigan Civil Rights Commission and
served as a city councilman from 1967
to 1969.
Additionally, Feldkamp has main-
tained a part-time law practice since
1971.
I'll miss this city," Feldkamp said.
"I've been very active in the communi-
ty and would have been celebrating my
twentieth year in Ann Arbor this year."

By JULIE ROVNER
and BOB ROSENBAUM
They call themselves the refugees of Ann Arbor's
housing shortage.
The Coalition for Better Housing has been camping
for two days in a miniature tent city next to the Student
Activities Building (SAB in an effort to dramatize the
plight of many returning students who found themselves
without a place to live.,
AS A RESULT of the shortage, students are tempor-
arily doubling up in single rooms, nesting in hastily con-
verted dorm lounges, or parking a bed wherever else
there's room.
To protest the situation, the Coalition pitched tents
Wednesday night and were scheduled to leave this morn-
ing.
"Some people have to spend their first few weeks in ten-
ts or on people's couches or floors," said coalition chair-'
man Tim Kunin, "because everything is too crowded or
too expensive or too far from campus.
WE FEEL THAT THE University is not living up to
its responsibility to provide enough reasonably priced
housing for its students," he said. "When the University
can't provide housing it pushes students into an already
overcrowded city housing market and pushes rents up
even further. It's even keeping some low-income people

from getting a college education at afl.
"What we really need is a new dorm."
But housing officials maintain that construction of
new housing is not now possible.
"I don't like the situation any more than the students
do," said John Finn, director of housing information, "es-
pecially since I catch all the hell. If we could have more
housing it would just make my job easier. We've done
studies and held hearings but the Regents keep saying
no'.'
For women, campus housing is particularly difficult.
SEVERAL FACTORS'HAVE LEFT the housing office
with over 100 women for whom to find dorm space:
* For the first time since it was begun three years
ago, the spring housing lottery found all of its spaces
filled;
*This term saw a two per cent rise in housing applica-
tions;
" There have been fewer lease cancellations than
usual.
ACCORDING TO ROBERT HUGHES, the newly ap-
pointed acting director of housing, the situation will
"work itself out," meaning that all unplaced students will
probably have permanent rooms by Sept. 16. If by that
time students are still in temporary rooms, officials plan
See THE NEW, Page 13

Feldkamp.
Lanc'enot
'Cleared in
r eport by'
conipiriler
WASHINGTON (AP - The comp-
troller of the currency yesterday said
that his reportlast month did not clear
budget director Bert Lance of financial
improprieties, even though it found no
evidence of illegality.
Lance had claimed it did clear him.
"That certainly wasn't our assertion.
That is not in my opinion a judgment I
can make," John Heimann, com-
ptroller of the currency, told the Senate
Governmental Affairs Committee as it
reopened conflict of interest hearings
on Lance.
THE COMPTROLLER, who
regulates the nation's banks, eni-
phasized that his reports on Lance's
' See COMPTROLLER's, Page 13

E

Hey,
The Daily has never looked
thi god.1 a -"sa

ook

us

over:

The

Daily goes'cold'

... .. -.e

1890. That process is called
"hot type," and it's about as
ma 'orn "Stnn the nresses !"

Hot leadtis dead

that can be easily taught. We
hope students will eventually
command this process at the

"YEAH, IT'S GREAT," said
co-editor-in-chief Ann Marie
Lipinski. "Oh, isn't that dumb?

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