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September 08, 1977 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursclay, September 8, 1977°

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thu rsc!ay, 5eptember87197T

'sel

I

edges Pierce for House seat

I DALEY
s election has
he controversy
of those cam-
bsided.
r former Rep.
e c o n d Con-
t seat finally
May when the
ed Democratic
d Pierce's re-
nt., Pierce, an,
clan, was de-
er by Republi-
by a scant 344
congressional'

ilant," Pursell said on election
night.
Pierce pursued his attempt to
gain a seat in the House for
more than six months after the
election. He continued to call for
a recount, starting at the local
level and progressing all the
way to the U.S. House. All his
requests to re-tally the vote
were denied.
Despite the controversy over
who had really won the election,
Pursell took his seat when Con-
gress opened in January.
FOLLOWING the decision to
certify Pursell as the winner,
Pierce said, "I feel like I've
been on a roller coaster and now

I've reached the bottom of the
ride."
He added, however, that he
would continue to seek the re-
count.
The congressional campaign
centered on the issues of health
care, defense spending and the
environment. Pierce, as a phy-
sician, spoke out in favor of a
National Health Care program,
while Pursell touted his highly
praised environmental protec-
tion bill - Michigan's Resource
Recovery Act. The two spent
much of their campaign time in
the Ann Arbor area, although
the Second Congressional Dis-
trict includes parts of Wayne
and Monroe - counties, staging

several debates before Univer-
sity political science classes.
THE CONTROVERSY which
shadowed another local election
last November has also just sub-
sided. Former Washtenaw Coun-
ty Sheriff Frederick Postill, who
lost his bid for re-election to Re-
publican Thomas Minick, was
recently acquitted of the felo-
nious assault -charges which
some observers say contributed
to his loss.
In July 1976, just a few weeks
before the primary election,
Postill was involved in a brawl
with one of his own deputies
during a wedding reception in
Chelsea and was accused of at-

t jub-

tempting to choke the deputy,
Basil Baysinger, with a ,pair, of
handcuffs.
Following the charges and the
accompanying publicity, Postill
barely squeaked past his Demo-
cratic opponent in the primary
election. As the campaign pro-
gressed toward November, Pos-
till's efforts to retain his job as
sher.iff were hampered as he
stood a lengthy pre-trial hear-
ing and then became involved
in, a series of lawsuits with both
Baysinger and s e v e r a 1 local
newspaper employes.
MINICK, A former member of
the Ann Arbor Police Depart-
ment, was careful to avoid the
issue of the Chelsea brawl
throughout the campaign
months. Instead, the many Pos-
till/Minick debates (two minor
party candidates also ran for
sheriff) were marked by name-
calling and conflict over the
issue of Teamster participation
in the sheriff's department and
the question of what type of
drug control the department
should institute.
But despite the fact that none
of the candidates dwelled on the
Chelsea incident, the local me-
dia continued to make it a front-
page story. Observers say this
may have cost Postill the elec-,
tion; the final tally showed
Minick had defeated the incum-
bent 62,399 to 37,459.
The ordeal was not -over for
Postill, however. tThe former
See PURSELL, Page 7

'here's one in every town.

- 1

One hotel that stands
for excellence, one'hotel that
in time gains a reputation
for superiority.
In Ann Arbor, the
Campus Inn is earning that
reputation.
Our philosophy is to
make every guest feel at
least as comfortable as he
would at home. To do this,
we demand the highest
quality in everything we
buy for the hotel, whether
it's a, sirloin steak or a
chandelier. Our conscien-
tious sense of pride means
you can expect the finest-
every time you visit.
Like all great hotels, we
rely on reputation, not bright
lights or billboards. We're
on campus, at the corner of
Huron and State. Come,
be our guests at a fine
hotel.

Datly Photo by PAULINE LUKIENS
Ann Arbor physician Edward Pierce fought a legal battle well past last November's election in
an attempt to gain a seat in the U.S. House. Pierce lost the Second Congressional District seat
to Carl Pursell by only 344 votes.

ease student housinc

SHORT or LONG
Haireuttinq By Experts
DASCOLA
STYLISTS
Arborland-971-9975
Maple Vilae-76 1-2733
E. Libertv--66$-9329
E. University-662-0354

By DENISE FOX
Half the battle of living in
Ann Arbor is finding a place to
live. The other half is making
sure the place you find is habit-
able, both in terms of rent and
living conditions.
According to Jonathan Rose,
director of the campus branch of

WOULD FAMOUS JA
IN MUSICALLERSTUDIO
iNSTtIMETS ~tRUESHISTORIC
MERN
FOREIGN
DOMESTIC
repai SALES
ACCESSORtIES s
RENTAL
LESSONS FOLK
CUSTOM /'R M .ECLSIUC
A.-1 PM
ID j~jjsEDe
PONE65-80 EXCEPT S
209 St. STATE, ANN ARBOR (UPSTAIRS)

the Legal Aid Society (LAS) and
co-director of the Michigan Stu-
dent Assembly (MSA) Housing
Law Project, that's no small;
battle. Landlords in Ann Arbor,
he said, charge high rent be-
cause they can get away with it.-'
"It's the nature of landlordsj
to be very fond of money," Rose
said. "They know there's a
housing shortage and can charge
a lot."
Through the Housing Law Pro-
ject, Rose and fellow attorney
Paul Teich are combatting what
they believe to be the injustices
of the tenant/landlord relation-
ship. The, p r o j e t, funded
through the University, seeks to
provide better housing for stu-
dents and a more equitable re-
lationship-between tenants and
landlords.
Among the programs Rose is
working on is a model contract'
between landlords and the Ann
Arbor Tenant's Union. This con-
tract is designed to slow down'
the housing influx to provide bet-

eys try to,,
ter bargaining power etween
tenants and landlords.
"Last year the Ann Arbor
vacancy rate was .07 per
cent," he said. "Housing and
Urban Development recom-
mends a seven per cent mini-
mum for a healthy atmos-
phere."
Rose is also working on a book
to inform tenants how to take a
case against a landlord to court
without the aid of an attorney.
Both Rose and Teich belong to
Mayor Albert Wheeler's Fair
Rental Practice Committee (FR-
PC) which is attempting to solve
housing problems in Ann -Arbor.
"We developed and wrote
about one-half of the recommen-
dations that camze .,out 'o1:the
cmmittee," Rose:said.
1", t w o recommendations
which he considers most import-
ant are that the University take
a direct role in solving the hous-
ing problem, and, providing a
See ATTORNEYS, Page 7

East Huron at State. Ann Arbor, Michigan
Phone 313/769-2200

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