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September 08, 1977 - Image 57

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Daily Photos by ALAN BILINSKY and CHRISTINA SCHNEIDER
Left-John Johnson knows there's more than one way to avoid Ann Arbor traffic and still get where you're going. Johnson travels
through campus on his unicycle daily. Right-An aerial view of the city, looking southwest, taken from 2600 feet. The road in the
center is Broadway. The train tracks run along the bottom with the Gandy Dancer restaurant in the lower left corner. Below-
Downtown Ann Arbor from the top of the Ann Arbor Inn. The ti gred structure in the upper left is the new Federal Building.

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... places to vi
By STU McCONNELL
Unless you're a hermit, it is absolutely certain that before you
leave this University someone-usually a fat, balding man in a
Monte Carlo with a dog-eared Chamber of Commerce map-will'
ask you how to get to North Campus.
You will scratch your head, start to say something, make a
few halting gestures to the northeast and finally resort to the
oft-quoted Kansas farmer punch line: "You can't get there from
here."
WHEN THAT HAPPENS, you have had your first lesson in
Ann Arbor geography.
It's not so much that the roads don't lead where you want to
go-they do, eventually. It's just that the city wasn't designed for
cars.
Besides the city police, who have no mercy for illegally
parked cars anywhere within a mile from campus, the hapless
Ann Arbor motorist must also cope with loose dogs, bicyclists,
uppity pedestrians who flip the bird at him (or her), small but
devious cement traffic islands, "computerized" traffic signals,
and a complex system of occasionally intersecting one-way
streets which is redesigned every couple of years just to keep
things challenging.
NEEDLESS TO SAY, the best way around town is on foot or
a bicycle. But don't let that stop you from exploring the city,
because there are some fascinating neighborhoods which are
easy to miss from a car.
The "central eight" census tracts of the city include the
narrowes streets, the oldest buildings, the highest rents and sur-
prise-the University of Michigan. On campus, there are shopping
districts along South University Ave. (which runs east from the
Union), South State St., and East Liberty St.
Liberty Street, which runs east to west two blocks north of
the Union, is a "corridor" of transportation and small shops all
the way to downtown, which is five blocks west of campus. A
word of warning though: the first block is one-way, so forget
about driving back that way.
Downtown is centered around Main St., a concrete-and-potted-
trees paradise for urban spacemen. It has been suffering from
competition with shopping malls the last few years, but there are
still some large stores (mostly clothing), some good restaurants
and excellent bars. The small "bar district" is in the two blocks
west of Main and includes such local watering holes as the Blind
Pig, Mr. Flood's Party, Del Rio, Old Town and the Flame.
OTHER NOTABLE downtown sights include Fourth Ave
Ann Arbor's one-block red light district-and City Hall, Fifth
at Huron St.
North of central campus and downtown is the Near Northeast
Catholic Students:
Have fun and meet people through
Newman Club
THE CATHOLIC STUDENT ORGANIZATION
OF ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL (663-0557)
ANNUAL FALL PICNIC
Sunday, 6 p.m., Sept. 18
at the NEWMAN CENTER
(2blks. west of the diaq)
Corner of William and Thompson
Opening Meeting September 19, Mon., 7 p.m.
NEWMAN IS .. .

Neighborhood group. The west end of the area, along Main Street
and Fifth Ave., is fairly sleazy, but the eastern end, along Divi-
sion, Thayer and Ingalls, is one of the prettiest areas in town. It
contains many old houses-several of them historical sites-and
stately trees line the narrow (one-way) streets.
North of this district is the. Huron River, which, like the
captain's daughter of the song, is not bad looking late at night.
In the daytime, however, it's not much, especially to swim in.
The railroad tracks play tag with the river all the way through
town, and the depot lies a block off Division on a street entitled,
appropriately, Depot Street.
SEE A2, Page 7
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sites to see

Levi's eons,
Long And Lean
Now, Levi's cords
for that long trim
look you want.
With all the traditional
dotailing Levi's is
famous for ...
Levi's traditional
q~uality, too.
And Levi's Durawale Plus
gives you cord's soft
comfort plus built-in
shrinkage control.
$14.00
SIZES 28-d2

* SUNDAY DINNERS
* IM SPORTS
0 SKIING TRIPS
* COMMUNITY SERVICE
PROJECTS

" HAYRIDES'
* APPALACHIA TRIP
* PICNICS
* AND MORE!

"
Fi ets
xs~c 89 oannaro

MONDAY MEETING, ORGANIZED, STUDENT RUN,
EVERYONE IS WELCOME

... getting around town,

I

By EILEEN DALEY
Even the most carefully trained laboratory rat
would find Ann Arbor's maze of streets baffling.
The seemingly*'random assortment of dead-enl
and one-way roads makes driving in the city
difficult, if not totally impossible. And even if
you do successfully reach your destination by'
car, chances are you will be upable to find a.~
parking spacewhen you get there.
But don't despair. There are plenty of alter-
native modes of transportation available.
WALKING IS often the easiest-and fastest--
wayrto travel around AnndArbor. Just bedwary
of frazzled drivers who don't take kindly to
jaywalking pedestrians.
For cyclists who utilize their bikes as a means
of serious transportation and those who just ride
for pleasure, the Urban Area Transportation
Study Committee (UATSC) and the Washtenaw
County Parks and Recreation Commissioners
(WCPARCQ Have mapped out' a web of local
bike routes. There are routes that run within
city limits as well as paths which course through-
out the county. UATSC and WCPARC have put
together a brochure-available upon request at
the Ann Arbor City Hall information desk-de-
scribing the routes.
If you're not quite that energetic, a mere 25
cents (no pennies, please) can put you on any
Ann Arbor Transportation Authority (AATA)
bus. Buses travel along seven routes, including

Union, and Crisler Arena. Other buses run from
Central Campus to North Campus every 10 min-
utes during the day and every 15 minutes after
6 p.m. with stops at Northwood, Bursley, Baits
and the North Campus Commons. Exact times,
should be posted in bus shelters.
if you want to get somewhere in a hurry,
calling one of the cab companies that service
Ann Arbor might be your best bet. Taking a cab j]
can be expensive, however-10 cents per mile or1
minute, whichever comes first. You may prefer
to call Dial-a-Ride, operated by the AATA, which
is lessexpensive but not likely to arrive nearly
as quick.
DIAL-A-RIDE-the city's atoy of purple and
yellow vans-will transport you just about any-
where within city limits for a phone call and a
quarter. The service operates between 6:15 a.m.
and 11 p.m. on weekdays, 8 a.m.-11 p.m. Satur-
day and 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday.
But don't count on Dial-a-Ride if you need to
get somewhere at the last minute. Ride requests
should be phoned in an hour in advance. It
seems to take an eternity to get through to an
AATA operator (although they kindly provide
muzak to callers placed on hold) and often op-
erators will refer callers to regular city bus
lines,
But usually the AATA is doing you a favor by
referring you to the regular buses. "In a lot of
cases, a person who's dispatching the call is
suggesting the quicker routes," explained mar-
keting coordinator Jan Nemvalts. "Basically,

Your Transit Connection
Dial 973.0300 m

ann arbor transportation authority

CONVENIENT SERVICE
7 DAYS A WEEK:
f 6:30 a.m.-1 1:00 p.m. Mon. thru Fri.
0 8:00 a.m =11:00 p.m. Saturday
* 8:00 a.m"-6:00 p.m. Sunday
NEED MORE
INFORMATION?
We're frequently expanding service.
You can get current AATA schedules at:
* Ann Arbor Public Library

THESE ROUTES SERVE THE
CAMPUS/HOSPITAL/DOWNTOWN AREA:
* Plymouth Mall:
Broadway; Plymouth Rd., Plymouth Mall, & Huron High
* Briarwood:
Main St., Eisenhower Pkwy., Packard & Platt, & Arborland
* Miller Huron:
Maple Village, Miller Rd., Jackson Rd., Huron St.
. Packard:
Ellsworth, Platt, Pittsfield Village, Meijer's, & W.C.C.

* Washtenaw:
Arborland, and Ypsilanti
* Huron River Route:
V.A. Hosp., W.C.C , St. Joseph Hosp., & Ypsilanti

0
0

LSA Building Information Desk
76 GUIDE (Michigan Union)
Or call AATA at 973-0300

,--- RETURN THIS COUPON ---
'*** FOR MORE INFO ***'
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OTHER FEATURES:
" DIAL-A-RIDE: Call 973-1611 for reservations (you can get anywhere
in Ann Arbor by using a combination of buses and DIAL-A-RIDE vans).
Transfers are free.
A LIFT EQUIPPED VANS for handicapped persons available call;

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