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October 30, 1977 - Image 9

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Michigan Daily, 1977-10-30

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, October 30, 1977-Page 9

LEACH HITS FOR 3 TD 'S:
Blue shoots

down Hawks

(Continued from Page 1)
and Rick (Leach) was outside of their
containment. He actually pointed to
Russell to keep moving instead of
locking. Then the defense had to
ake a decision and the linebacker was
oreed to go after Leach.
"It was well-done," he added.
"Russell is rather deceptive, speed-
wisg
Michigan controlled the rest of the
alf, limiting the Hawkeyes, who con-
entrated on rushing, to just three first
owns. But the Wolverines also stopped
hemselves by missing a field goal and
umbling twice.
Greg Willner's 44-yard field goal at-.
empt with just under three minutes left
n the second quarter was wide to the
left. :He also failed on a 49-yard attempt
in the third period, dropping his season
total to two field goals in nine attempts.
Another scoring attempt failed mid-
ay' through the second quarter when
Nichigan lost a fumble on the Iowa 2-
yard line. Tailback Harlan Huckleby
ook an end-over-end pitchout. and
:ropped it. Iowa strong safety Shanty
Burks recovered.
The play marked the second time

hapless Huckleby had fumbled on the 2-
yard line, and he was heartily booed by
the sellout crowd. Roosevelt. Smith
replaced Huckleby on the next
Michigan series, but Schembechler
denied that the fumble had anything to
do with the substitution.
On Michigan's next possession,
Leach moved the team 47 yards in nine
plays. With just 30 seconds left on the
clock, Leach saw tight end Gene John-
son waving in the end zone and com-
pleted a sixy-yard pass for the score.
There was pass interference oni the
play, but Michigan declined the
penalty.
Willner's extra point made it
Michigan 14, Iowa 0.
Michigan attempted an onside kick
after the touchdown, but Nick Labun's
attempt went out of bounds on the Iowa
27-yard line after hitting several
players.
"We looked like a high school team on
that play," laughed a rueful Schem-
bechler. "I'm not sure we should have
unveiled'that secret play."
Both teams got off to a slow start af-

ter intermission. Michigan's first
possession set up Willner's missed 49-
yard field goal attempt.
The Hawkeyes then failed to earn a
first down and Michigan took over for
what was to be its final scoring drive.
On the first play from scrimmage at the
Michigan 35, Leach rolled left, then
reversed and went around right end for
a 22-yard gain.
Five plays later, he passed 'to split
end Rick White, who caught the ball in
the middle of the end zone despite inter-
ference by Iowa.
The Hawkeyes finally mounted a
sustained drive covering 90 yards in 21
plays to set up their sole touchdown.
Abandoning the rushing attack, quar-
terback Tom McLaughlin completed
nine passes in12 attempts.

Michigan was nearly as good by air as
by ground, gaining 202 yards passing
and 208 yards rushing.
"The Iowa defense was so geared to
stop the run that you almost have to
pass," said Schembechler. "Under dif-
ferent circumstances, we may have
thrown even more in the second half."
"We found that their defense was
bringing everyone up on the line, so we
had to throw to break them up," noted
tight end Johnson.
Schembechler was pleased with the
win, although he said the Wolverines
"still stop themselves too much."
"We are not satisfied with the way we
are moving the ball yet, not by any
means," he said. "However, I'm
satisfied just to win, to get our con-
fidence back and our spirits up."
Referring to the 16-0 loss at Min-
nesota, Schembechler said, "When
you've won a lot and you lose, it's
devastating, make no mistake about
that. We would have been happy with a
1-point victory today."

Home, Commings

MICHIGAN IOWA

SCORE... .... ............ 23
Total first downs ........ ....... 19
Rushing ............. .....12
Passing ............... .. .. 7
Penalty ...................... 0
RUSHING
Attempts/net yards ........... 57/208
Yards gained/Lost rushing. 240/32
Net yards passing 202
Passes Att/Comp/Int .... ......19/9/0
Total offensive plays/yards .... 69/410
Average gain per play ......... 5.9
interceptions/yards returned 0
Punts/Averaged/Blocked ...... 3/46.6/0

6
12
3
9
0
36/50
89/39
174
22/16/0
58/224
3.9
0
7/37.1/0

PUNT RETURNS
No./net yards.................0
KICKOFF RETURNS
No./net yards .............. 1/19
PENALTIES
No./yards ..................... 5/35
FUMBLES
No./lost................. .... 2/2
1 SCORING
MICHIGAN................7 7 7
IOWA ....................0 0 0

0
3/63
5/70
2/1
2-23
6- 6

McLaughlin's one-yard plunge put
the Hawkeyes on the scoreboard.
"That was a heckuva drive," Schem-
bechler remarked. "Up until that time
they had tried to run on us. We figured
that after they looked at the Minnesota
films they would test us inside and they
had."
Iowa elected to go for two points, but
McLaughlin rolled left and was stopped
behind the line of scrimmage by,
Michigan defensive tackle Dale Keitz.
The Wolverines' last score came with
just 1:24 left in the game, as fans were
filing out of the stadium. Michigan
linebacker Dom Tedesco caught
McLaughlin in the end zone for a safety,
giving Michigan a 23-6 win.
Michigan's record now stands at 7-1
overall, 4-1. in conference play while
Iowa dropped to 3-5 and 2-3.
3 Leach was particularly effective for
Michigan, completing nine of 12 passes
and throwing no interceptions.

Ohio State
MICHIGAN
Michigan State
Wisconsin
Indiana'
Iowa
Minnesota
Illinois
Purdue
Northwestern

W
5
4
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
0

Conference

L
0
1
1
3
2
3
3
3
3
6

T
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

All Games
W L T
7 1 0
7 1 0
4 3'1
5 3 0
3 4° 1
3 5 0
5 3 0
3 5 0
4 4 0
0 8 0

Big Ten
Standings

* too little too late
W ITH 20 MINUTES left in yesterday's game, the Iowa offense really
stuck it to Michigan. Attacking the Wolverine defense in its
traditionally weakest spot-the pass-Iowa marched the ball 90 yards to
score its only six points of thWe game .. .
... Eighty-two of those yards came through an aerial attack.
The effort, of course, was too little too late. After trying to pound the ball
up the middle for two-thirds of the game against a defense geared to stop the
run, the Hawkeyes finally tried the alternate route.
In the first half, the Hawkeyes tried 19 runs and only three passes. They
gained 40 yards rushing and 50 through the air. Yet, Iowa came out running
again in the second half.
The first five runs Iowa tried in the second half netted a loss of one yard.,
It was then that Iowa coach Bob Commings went to a serious air assault.
Iowa tried 17 passes after that, and ended the game with 174 yards through
the air, and only 50 on the ground.
Like so many other teams who have played Michigan this season, Iowa
didn't go to the pass as soon as some would have expected.
It didn't surprise Coach Bo Schembechler that Iowa tried to attack the
Michigan defense which he said was "soft" up the middle against Min-
nesota. "I wasn't surprised that they tested us inside," he said, "not after
what Minnesota did. I expected them to... what else would they do?"
Bo even had his defense ready for the Iowa exam. "We expected it,"
linebacker Ron Simpkins assured. "After the Minnesota game, we knew
they would test us on the ground first."
It was plain to see that the Blue defense aced the test. The first 24 times
the Hawkeyes ran the ball, they netted only 39 yards. During the running
test, they also scattered four passes-good for 52 yards.
Finally the idea sank in. Iowa started throwing.
Even knowing how well the passing game went, Commings was quick to
defend his game plan. "Our game plan was to run straight at them," he said,
"and if we had not made so many mistakes, I think we would have won. We
had a helluva game plan.
"When you play Ohio State or Michigan, you have to play an error-free
game. We could have won ... with a near perfect game. That's what Min-
nesota did (to beat Michigan).
The mistake-riddled game Commings was talking about included only
one Iowa turnover (compared to Michigan's two) and few defensive slips,
not a great number by any standards.
Iowa did not make that many blatant mistakes, although the Hawkeyes
did not play perfect either. However, this was the first time I had ever heard
a coach blame the loss on his team not playing perfect ball.
The Miehigan offense took Part II of the Iowa test. Michigan felt, as
quarterback Rick Leach said, "That (the Iowa defense) was the best defen-
sive team we have played all year. I don't know their stats,but they are one
of the best (defenses) in the nation."
"People underestimate Iowa," echoed Schembechler. "That is as tough
a defense as we played all year."
Granted, they were able to slow down the powerful Michigan running
game. But then, "when a defense is SO geared against the run," as Schem-
bechler said, "you almost have to pass."
So pass Michigan did. When Bo is really forced to pass, he does it...
without hesitation.
"We did what the defense dictated," Leach explained. "They came up
so we passed. Every team comes up with something different (to try to stop
Michigan). We just adjust to what they do."
It seems so easy. Michigan simply passed for 202 yards yesterday, in-
cluding three which went for Wolverine touchdowns.
Game after game this year, Schembechler has shown that he isn't afraid
to pass and that he can use it effectively. At the same time, Leach has been
showing his critics that his arm is good for something other than baseball
and that his vision is not impaired.
The Ohio State game is not that far away... maybe this year the game
will have a new look to it.

a .
~4
,. s4
'
... . ,
* DA
64
y ,. W
*,

DENVER DEALS ICERS FIRST LOSS:
Wolverines axed 'in overtime, 6-5

By PAUL CAMPBELL

Denver center Vince Magnan skated
round a defenseman and flipped the
uck past Michigan goalie Rick Palmer
ith 1:24 gone in sudden death over-
ime to give the Pioneers as6-5 victory
nd a split of their two-game series.
Magnan snapped up a pass from
raig Roehl at center.ice and flew in on
he left side. He muscled his way past
John Waymann halfway between the
blue line and the goal and flicked a'
backhand shot that deflected off
Palmer into the goa, eiiding' the
Wolverines to their first defeat of the
young season.

THE OVERTIME tally thwarted a
Michigan comeback that brought the
Wolverines back from a four-goal defi-
cit in the second half of the contest.
After -.Perry Schnarr gave the
Pioneers a 5-1 lead at 7:41 of the second
period on a drive from between the
circles that dribbled off Palmer's
glove; star center Dave Debol took
over.
The elusive senior dazzled a Denver
defender with a full spin from the boar-
ds, headed towards the goal and spotted
Mark Miller streaking into the slot. One
perfect pass and nifty wrist shot later,
Michigan had narrowed the gapto 5-2.
Debol's next trick came on a power

play late in the period. Controlling the
puck behind the Denver goal, Debol
whipped it onto the stick of Billy
Thayer. Thayer's low drive found the
twine in the left corner behind Denver
goalie Jim Bales.
IT WAS THE Wolverines' first power
play goal in nine opportunities. In fact,
having a man advantage proved to be
Michigan's undoing, as captain Bob
Pazzelli scored two shorthanded goals.
in a row in the first period. Four of
Denver's goals came when one of its'
men was serving time for one of the
fifteen penalties called against it.
But Thayer's goal sparked the
Michigan power play to life, and with
Schnarr in the box for cross checking,
Debol set up Kip Maurer at 1:30 of the
third period to bring the Wolverines

back within one.
Only one more penalty was called in,
the game, but Doug Todd took advan-
tage of it to tie the game at 8:04 as he
blasted a rebound of a Dean Turner
slap shot past Bales.
BUT THE PIONEERS kept their
poise and circled their wagons around
Bales to stave off Michigan's patented
late pressure, which had given the
Wolverines a 15-3 advantage over their
opponents in the third period so far this
year.
The Pioneers totally dominated the
first half of the ga'me. Exdept for a goal
by Debol at 2:25, the best the
Wolverines could muster was an ap-
parent goal by Todd which was called
off because Dan Lerg was a stride of-
fside on the rush.

Ble win over Iowa
restores conf idence,
By DON MacLACHLAN
Michigan reacquainted itself with the winning side of things yesterday.
The sixth-ranked Wolverines put the Minnesota defeat behind them and
chugged past Iowa 23-6. ,
But was the defeat completely out of their minds? No way. Coach Bo
Schembechler and his players are not accustomed to losing very many foot-
ball games.
"That was a devastating defeat a week ago," Schembechler said.
.Nobody will ever know how hard it is to come back from a loss like that."
"I'm satisfied with the win-it gets our confidence back and gets our
spirits up," Schembechler added. "Winning is a great thing and when you
win a lot you enjoy it. But when you win a lot and then you lose-it's
devastating, make no mistake about that."
The coaches worked extremely hard at rebuilding the Wolverines' con-
fidence during practice this week. The upset at Minneapolis was hard to take
but there's no time to dwell on it. The rest of the season lies ahead and the
slip-up makes the road just a little rougher.
"We knew we had to win today," said tight end Gene Johnson. "Last
week put us in a situation we didn't want to be in."
"Right after the loss to Minnesota we knew we had a lot of pressure on
us," said middle guard Steve Graves. "Consequently, we practiced hard this
week. Everybody knew what we had to do. It was all on the line. For the
duration of the season all our games will be like championship games, and
that is how we wi1lplay them."
The important thing yesterday was to taste a victory again, regardless
of the margin. After losing a team can become wary of every opponent and
the possibility of defeat. The conquering of Iowa reestablished the winning
attitude.
"Every now and then we get a breakdown that %yill hurt us," said'
linebacker Ron Simpkins. "A loss makes you think. But that bad feeling af-
ter the game at Minnesota can be motivating for the last four games."
"Last week may have been more of a confidence shaker than the loss at
Purdue last year," said Jerry Meter. "We put more effort into practice this
week and got our confidence back. That helped a lot."
"We set our goals high and we weren't just going to lay back," said.
Russell Davis, who led Michigan in rushing yesterday with 67 yards.
One of those team goals is the Big Ten title. Three conference clashes
remain, and a win in each is a must to gain another conference champion-
ship. In the meantime a few areas need polishing.
"Our offense still conerns me," Schembechler said. "I'm not satisfied
with the way we are moving the ball. We are stopping ourselves a lot with
broken plays, blocking breakdown and poor execution."

Home, Pioneers!

SCORES BY PERIOD
1 230 5
3 2 0 1 6

MICHIGAN
DENVER

FIRST PERIOD
scoring: 1. M-Debol (Coffman, Wheeler) 2:25;
2. D-Pazzelli (Roehl, Woods) 7:32; 3. D-Pazzelli
(Roehl) 11:46; 4. D-Woods jBelcourt) 17:03.
Penalties: D-Falcone (cross checking) 3:31; D-
Sandbeck (cross checking) 7:17; M-Kawa (inter-
ference) 9:02 D-Falcone (tripping) 9:54; D-
Messier (hooking) 13:42; D--Purpur (interference)
18:56.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 5. D-Messer (Sandbeck, Magnan) 6:53;
6. D-Schnarr (Gibson, Berry) 7:41; 7. M-Miller
(Debol, McCahill) 15:02; S. M-Thayer (Debol,
Maurer) 18:39.

Penalties: D-Purpur (interference) 1:22; D-
Hudson (slashing) 6:09; M-Coffman (slashing)
6:09; D-Falcone (cross-checking) 8:54; M-Todd
(hooking) 10:38; D-Messier (slashing) 12:27; D-
Messier (fighting, 5 min.) 12:27; M-Lerg (fighting,
5 min.) 12:27; M-Lerg -(misconduct) 12:27; D-
Magnan (roughing) 12:27; M-Miler (roughing)
12:27; D-Sandbeck (interference) 17:48; D-
Schnarr (cross-checking) 20:00.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 9. M-Maurer (Debol, McCahill) 1:30;
10. M-Todd (Turner, Olver) 8:04.
Penalties: D-Davidson (tripping) 6:41.
OVERTIME
Scoring: 11. D-Magnan (Roehl, Pazzelli) 1:24.
SAVES

DINNER

"I.

MICHIGAN
DENVER

1 2
16 4
8 11

3
8

OT
0
1

F
28

2nd ANNUAL
.HALLOWEEN, PARTY
MOO4DAY, OCT. 31

PRIZES
1st-Color TV
2nd-2 50-yd. line tickets
for O.S.U. vs. U. of M.
3rd-Case of Champagne

SPONSORS
Second Chance & Big George's
Second Chance
Second Chance

4th-1 year pass to: Second Second Chance
Chance & dinner for two
Other Prizes . .. RECORD WORLD-BRIARWOOD

More than fifty percent of the world is starving.
Another twenty percent, just plain hungry. And yet, in the
face of starvation, they have hope. Hope that the rains will
return to the African Plain. Hope that the Asian rice crop
will be bigger this year. Hope that someone, anyone, with
anything to offer will come to help them fight the battle for
life. Someone in the Peace Corps. They'd like to stand up
for themselves, these prisoners of fate, but they're just
too weak to stand up. But with the Peace Corps a flame
begins to flicker. They've seen other like you before. Seen
the changes you can bring. Two thousand wells on the
parched earth of Sahel. Seen how their knowledge helped
reduce the grain losses. Who are they? They're people
pretty much like you. People with commitment and skills
who've assessed their lives and decided there must be
more than just having a job. They looked into themselves
and knew it was time for the talk to end and the work to
begin. They're very special people, these people. Totally
prepared to give everything they've got. And getting back
even more than they give. That's the beauty of the Peace
Corps. The work is hard and the pay is
lousy, and the progress comes a drop
at a time. But the rewards are infinite.
Join the Peace Corps and then
take a good long look in the mirror.
You'll never look the same to
yourself again.
The Peace Corps is alive and
well. Call toll free:
800-424-8580. Or write: The
Peace Corps, Box A,
Washington, D.C. 20525
Be

'V.
l '
44

JUDGES:
BOB UFER-Voice U. of M. (WJR) LARRY JURAN-Mich. Daily
FAT BOB-WAAM

GLEN WARSH-E. Echo
DAVE WHITING--Ypsi Press

516 E. LIBERTY-994-5350

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EATURING: Special$
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I

4HI"'GAN 23. Iowa 6
sichigan State 49, Illinois 20
ndiana 34, Minnesota 22
sa~no e..o.a-22

Oklahoma 42, Kansas State 7 Mic
Texas A&M 38, SMU 21
Central Michigan 35. Bowling Green 28

SOCCER
higan State 4, MICHIGAN 3 (OT)

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