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October 28, 1977 - Image 9

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-10-28

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 28, 1977-Page 9

CUTS TO COME NEXT YEAR:
Carter postpones tax

revisions

,,WASHINGTON (AP) - President
Carter announced yesterday that
he'll wait until next year to unveil his
long-awaited tax revision proposals
and that tax cuts to boost the
deconomy will be a part of his recom-
mendations.
"By the end of the year," he told a
nationally broadcast news confer-
ence, "we will have more informa-
tion . .. on the state of the economy,
t know how much of our tax reform
proposals should be devoted to stimu-
Jating the economy."
Asked about tax cuts, he said, "I
A would .say that the rate Hof. tax reduc-
ti*n and stimulation from the tax re-
form measures could only be as-
sessed at the end of this year."

-M Z

THE PRESIDENT opened the
32-minute session by appealing anew
for congressional action on his
energy package, saying all public
officials will be judged by "the
courage which we are able to
muster" in facing up to the energy
problem .
As Carter spoke, the Senate was
handing him his first energy victory
in weeks by agreeing to tax certain
industrial use of oil and natural gas
in hopes of forcing a shift to more
abundant coal.
It then turned aside by a 56-38 vote
an attempt by liberals to kill guaran-
tees that the national energy plan.
will include profit incentives for oil
and gas companies to find new

energy reserves.
Carter has declared-continued op-
position to Senate provisions offering
what he called "windfalls" for oil
companies but, again, said nothing
firm about possibly vetoing the bill.
IN OTHER pronouncements, the
President said:

* As for arms limitation talks with
the Soviet Union, there is "a fairly
good prospect" that disclosure of the
general outlines of a new Strategic
Arms Limitation Treaty can be made
"within the next few weeks." But he
added it would take several addition-
al months to work out all the fine
print.

Senate fixes House
abortion stance again

" Although there has been critic-
ism in Congress and elsewhere of his
performance in office, and a drop in
his poll-measured popularity, much
of this can be attributed to the
"controversial nature of some things
we put forward." But he said he will
not avoid trying to deal with difficult
national problems "simply to avoid
controversy."
" Atty. Gen. Griffin Bell has not
informed the White Housenyet wheth-
er Bell thinks the government should
try to indict former CIA Director
Richard Helms, who has been under
investigation for alleged perjury.
Bell has said he has decided whether
the government should seek an
indictment but would firststalk to
Carter about it.
. Asked about Republican critic-
ism that the administration is inept,
Carter said: "I remember in this
room last May someone asked me if
my administration was all image and
no substance, or all style and no sub-
stance. Lately the criticism has been
too much substance and not enough
style."

impression
in the
March of Dimes
WALKATiHON
THIS SPACE CONTRIBUTED BY THE PUBLISHER

U S., allies request
world, arms embargo
against South Africa

(Continued from Page 1)
PRESIDENT CARTER said at a
news conference earlier yesterday
the United States would support a
mandatory U.N. embargo on mili-
tary sales to South Africa. Carter de-
nied that his decision to support an
arms embargo represented interfer-
ence in South Africa's internal
affairs.
"I think it's important we express
in no uncertain terms our deep and
legitimate concern," Carter.said.
However, he said, no decision had
been made on whether to impose
economic sanctions against South
Africa. The United States is South
Africa's leading trade partner. and
American firms have investments of
about $1.5 billion there.
WHILE announcing U.S. support

for a worldwide arms embargo
against South Africa, the President
also said the United States would
tighten its own embargo, which has
been in force since 1963. This, he said,
would involve a halt in the shipment
of spare parts.
At the same time, Carter appealed
to the government in Pretoria not to
"sever itself from the rest of the
world community" by moving rapid-
ly to end racial segregation. '
It is proper, he said, for the United
States to either enhance or reduce its
trade with other countries depending
on their policies and to decide
whether to sell them arms. "I don't
look upon that as an interference in
the internal affairs of another coun-
try," he said.

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Sen-
ate, saying the health of the woman
and the fetus must be considered,
yesterdiay refused to agree to House
language that would severely limit
the number of poor women who could
use government funds for abortions.
The 59-to-33 rejection of a resolu-
tion that would have instructed
Senate conferees to accept the House
position sent the House-Senate con-
ferees'back to work with time for a
solution again running short.
THE ABORTION issue is tied to a
$60.2 billion funding bill for the
Department of Labor, the Depart-
ment of Health, Education and
Welfare and some smaller, related
agencies. Funding for the depart-
ments ran out on Sept. 30 but
Congress passed a continuing resolu-
tion that kept the money flowing for
another month.
However, that resolution expires.
on Monday and unless new action is
taken, the Treasury will stop paying
the salaries of the 240,000 federal em-
ployes and will cut off operating
money for the agencies.
Congressional aides say that even
if Congress cannot agree on an
abortion policy by Monday, govern-
ment benefits payments will continue
and employes will get their salaries
until Nov. 10.
The abortion question is the ,last
remaining obstacle to enactment of
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the legislation.
THE HOUSE bill allows the gov-
ernment to pay for abortions in cases
where a woman's life would be en-
dangered by a full-term pregnancy.
It would allow payments for prompt
medical procedures used to treat
victims of forced rape or incest if the
incidents are reported to authorities.
And it would allow payments for,
drugs or devices to prevent pregnan-
cy or end ectopic pregnancy.
The Senate would also permit
funding in cases where a woman's
life would be threatened by a full-
term pregnancy. And it would allow
abortion funding in cases of rape or
incest or where the woman or fetus
would suffer "serious health dam-
age."
Some House members have object-
ed to the last phrase because they
fear itis too broad and would permit
too many abortions. They claim it is
no different than an earlier Senate
proposal which would have permit-
ted abortions "where medically nec-
essary."

i

NCAA ootball
AND
Michigan Victory Party
*"1 crch(offS.*Univ*erityM-MlI

I

_lfpop rIId~
1!4 NOT DOU
from 3m -5a

11

EL JAYS GIFT'S
Going Out of Business Sale!
50% OFF ALL GIFT ITEMS!
Everything goes, even the fixtures, showcases, jewelry cases,
glass shelving, and brackets.
Gift shop located at Ann Arbor Inn, corner of South 4th
and Huron
7:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Weekdays and Sat., 9-5 Sun.
CALL 663-7155

Ne

Evening transit cut,
Sun. service saved
(Continued from Page 1)

V
n
" U
i
r.

TODAY is the
LAST DAY

for SENIOR PORTRAITS

hours.
"We do have seven-day bus service in
Ann Arbor," Guenther said. "I think
that is an important point."
Guenther said citizens had com-
plained more about proposed Sunday
and Saturday night service cuts than
the planned 10-cent fare increase. He
added he saw no more service cuts for
the present fiscal year.
After the Wednesday meeting, AATA
nard member Willie Horton said the
rd should have taken more time to
nd other possible solutions instead of

rushing to a "haphazard" decision.
"I THINK WE should have
deliberated more," Horton said.
"There could be other alternatives."
Horton added he favored, service
"modification" changes in little-used
transit routes in an effort to spread the
effects of the cuts across the entire
transit system. He also suggested the
possibility of using federal operating
funds to ensure adequate Ann Arbor
transit service.

NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSARY
JUST COME TO 420 MAYNARD, NEXT TO
S.A.B. FROM 9A:M.-1 P.M., 2 P.M.-5 P.M.
DON'T BE LEFT OUT OF YOUR YEARBOOK

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V

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