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October 26, 1977 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


y, October26, 177-The Michigan Daily

reacts to new S. African flare-up

v -

and urge governments to block new
investment there.
In 1975 the United States, Britain
and France used their council veto
power to kill an arms embargo reso-
lution against South Africa.
American U.N. Ambassador An-
drew Young, who says he person-
ally favors some kind of sanctions,
told reporters yesterday he does not
believe a simple condemnation of
South Africa's apartheid policies of
racial segregation would be suffi-
cient this time.
Young has been negotiating behind
the scenes in search of a consensus
position the Western nations and at'
least some of the black Africans
could support. He has not spoken yet
in the current council meeting, which
is to resume today.
In yesterday's debate, Chinese
Ambassador Chen Chu accused the
United States of trying to protect its
"vested interests" in South Africa by
helping the South Africans "peddle
the political fraud of 'peaceful evolu-
tion'."
He was referring to South African
statements that it intends to build a
new "multiracial" society peacefully
and gradually.
The British are believed particu-
larly concerned about the prospect of

V V ..L.

strict economic sanctions against
South Africa because Britain has a
large economic stake in its former
colony.
The British are the biggest invest-
ors in South African business and the
United States is second.
There were these other develop-
ments:
- min Bonn, West Germany, U.S.
Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezin-

ski and West German Foreign Minis-
ter Hans-Dietrich, Genscher ex-
pressed concern that South Africa's
new police measures could lead to a
black-white confrontations.
A Foreign Ministry spokesperson
said the two men agreed such a con-
frontation could ruin chances for
peace in white-ruled Rhodesia and
South-West Africa's Namibia, a ter-
ritory administered by South Africa

despite U.N. objections.
Brzezinski has been in Bonn since
Sunday attending the Trilateral Com-
mission meeting of Japanese, West-
ern European and North American
representatives.
" Zambian President Kenneth
Kaunda told foreign diplomats in
Lusaka the situation in southern
Africa is at the "breaking point."
Kaunda summoned the diplomats

to the state house and told them for-
eign governments cooperating with
the minority regimes in Rhodesia
and South Africa must reconsider
their positions.
"This is a moral issue which in the
end will be the determining factor as
to whether we can change the
systems in Southern Africa as peace-
fully as possible," he said.

SEC

(Continued from Page 1)
tinue," said Ken Latta (D-First
"What we are not happy with is
facts have been coming out so:
MAYOR ALBERT WHEEL]
there were differences of opinio
meeting, and it "quickly broke
to political postures, which did
prise me at all."
Wheeler also echoed Latta's
about the flow of information
from the administrator's office.
"I don't think Council can a
petently, until it has all of thei
tion," said Wheeler. "And we
been getting information untili

_ ._ __ - o _ ___ .. _._ _.._

subpoenas
venient to the administration."'
Ward). Louis Belcher (R-Fifth Ward) said i
that the- that as far as he was concerned "dis- c
ciplinary action has come to a halt.
ER said From a lot of the statements made byu
n a th Wheeler last week, I came in expecting c
on at- the a lynching." t
d down i- LAST WEEK, Wheeler was quoted as e
t sur- saying he thought some further discip- C
linary action, possibly against Murray,v
concern might be taken. Yesterday, however,
coming Wheeler denied entering the meeting
act com- with any preconceptions as to what ac- a
informa- tion might have been taken.
haven't "I had nothing prepared when thex
havent meeting began," said Wheeler. "I told l
it is con- the Council I'm not going to tell you
what to do and what not to do."u
Wheeler described the meeting as
being "heated and emotional at times.".d
ACCORDING to the Mayork, "The
Republicans made their position clear n
from the start. They wanted a positive°
and strong statement in support of thes
Administrator ... They presume thatr
any further inquiry is a personal attackr
on the administrator-- which it is not."f
Latta is on record as favoring an in-F
dependent audit, conducted by a firm
not connected with the city. An audit of
the city's Mutual Investment Fund has3
already been conducted by Icerman,
Johnson, and Hoffman - a local
auditing firm who audits all of the city's
records.
' However, it was revealed that one of
the firm's auditors knew of the
questionable investments in June, and
did not tell either Administrator Mur-
ray, or acting City Attorney R,. Bruce
Laidlaw.
LATTA SAID the Democrats and the
Republicans have reached an "im-
passe,"
"They told us, 'why do you continuej
to hound Murray and Kenny,' " said

CLatta. "The Republicans feel that the
nvestment committee is seeing to the'
citizens' interests."
The investment committee is made
up of Council members, members of the
city administration, and members of
he city's business community. It was
established for the purpose of getting
he city out of the investment quagmire
with as little financial loss to the city as
possible.
"THE COMMITTEE is not anywhere
as near as comprehensive as to judge
what went on in the past," said Latta.
"You could say that Council is not
iving up to its responsibility as stated
n the charter."
Meanwhile, it was disclosed that the
MFC has passed on the file it compiled
during its investigation of the invest-
ment scandal to the Attorney General's
office.
Don Fichter, chairman of the MFC,
said that the only recommendation
made by MFC was to "allow the Attor-
ney General time to review the entire
file, and report back to us as soon as
possible."
IT WAS REPORTED by the Daily
yesterday that former City Accountant
Marc Levin may face criminal or civil
charges because of his role in the scan-

ifficials.
aal. Fichter said the course of any
prosecution would be determined by the
Attorney General's office.
The director of the Criminal Division
of the Attorney General's office, John
Wilson, refused comment on the
possible prosecution of Levin.
the city is apparently in violation of
the state's Municipal Finance Act and
the State Constitution. The maximum
penalty for violating the MFC act is a
fine of not more than $100 and ten days
in jail.
But according to Assistant Attorney
General Stanley Steinborn, "as a
misdemeanor, the city may be charged
39 times" (once for every transaction
made).
If the maximum penalty is assessed,
the fine would be $3,900 and the
maximum jail term would be 13 mon-
ths.
County Prosecutor William Delhi,
who expects to handle any criminal
prosecution said, "I can't say what ac-
tion will be taken until the in-
vestigations are completed by the state
and the SEC. Once the iiformation
reaches my office, we can, go from
there."
Levin would only respond to the news
by saying, "I guess only.time will tell."

Gay center in peril
due to lack of funds,

Our roast beef sandwich isn't just a couple of thin slices of meat
thrown onto a piece of bread. It's a savory combination of U.S.D.A.
Choice roast beef, cut in thick slices, on our Hearthstone toast,
enhanced with a tasty au jus sauce.
In fact, the only thing skinny about our roast beef sandwich

BEETS

The University of Michigan
*J.7r" Professional Theatre Program
) Ann Arbor-Power Center
Oct. 28-30
Fri.-Sat.: 8 p.m. Sun.: 2 & 8 p.m.
PTP Ticket Office
Michigan League
Mon.-Fri. 10-1, 2-5 p.m.
For Info Cail (313) 764-0450
Tickets also available at oil Hudsons
ALSO THIS WEEK
First University Showcase
Thu Firt Breeze of SUmmer
Oct. 26-29 in Trueblood Theatre

i

By BRIAN BLANCHARD
Unless the Gay Community Services
Center (GCSC) discovers a lode of
money and energy in city residents and
students, the two-year old center will
close next week according to local
homosexual leaders.
"We're really getting caught by Ma
Bell and the landlord," said Lionel
Biron, a staff member at the two room
"drop-in" center on South Forest St.
The volunteer-staffed center operates
on individual contributions, which have
steadily decreased over the last few
years, said Biron.
"WE ARE THE only completely gay
controlled space in Ann Arbor," said
Biron. He explained that while bars and
discos are also centers of activity "we
are a learning and educational center
independent of the University and
business."

GCSC has a small library and ar-
chives of literature relating to gay ex-
periences and history. The Center also
serves as the home for a 24-hour hotline
used by both gays and straights with
questions about homosexuality and ac-
tivities on campus, said Biron.
About 25 people, primarily non-
students,. come to Monday night
meetings, according to Biron. But
"(GCSC) radiates beyond the physical
location" making it hard to determine
the number of people who use the phone
service information.
"It depends on how much people are
moved," said Tom Iott, treasurer of the
-center, of the possibility that support
for the center will surface in the next
few days.
The center will hold a last meeting at
its present location at 7:30 Monday
night to finalize the decision.

3035 Washtenaw across from Lee Olds, Ann Arbor

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