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October 23, 1977 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-10-23

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aits-worth the wait

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, October 23, 1977-Page 7
BRIDGE: Turning Tricks

(Continued from Page 5)
released before Foreign Affairs, and.
he left the material from his first
LP, Closing Time, untouched.
Waits was most effective when
signing his slow ballads; Bad Liver
and a Broken Heart had the audien-
ce hushed as Waits performed alone,
accompanying himself surprisingly
well on acoustic piano. The song is a
' bitter one, and Waits' voice was.
filled with emotion as he sang,
I don't have a drinking problem
'Cept when I can 't get a drink
And! wish you'd a known her
We were quite a pair
She was sharp as a razor
Ana soft as a prayer
The crowd cheered with recogni-
* Audince
(Continued from Page 5)
platform on which his drums were se
up began to revolve, revealing the intri
cate patterns on the back of his gongs
Reaching amazing speeds, at times his
hands appeared to be playing two dif
ferent drums simultaneously, an
being able to whip the sticks behind his
back and catch them without missing a
beat was an extrodinary feat. While
playing with the rest of the ban
Palmer was responsible for keeping th
tempo of the songs moving. The fact
that he was able to is a tribute to his en
durance, especially considering th
temperatures in Bowen reached level

tion as Waits' began some of his bet-
ter-known tunes, such as Emotional
Weather Report sand Pasties and a
G-String. At the end of the latter,
Waits performed a unique medley
by imitating Stanley Kowalski from:
A Streetcar Named Desire, and then
launching into the song A Girl
Named Maria from WestSide Story.
Hle then attempted to encourage.
Maria, waiting in the wings, to come
on stage. The audience loved it.
The concert took on a bizarre side
attraction during the song
Nighthawks At The Diner, when a
CB-radio conversation appeared
unexpectedly over one of the
monitor speakers. Waits and his
band conferred about the five-
minute interruption, and as sax
oves
normally found only in saunas and
t barren deserts.r
- Bowen is, as anyone who has been to
- a concert can testify, is far from ideal
s for concerts. The lighting was off at
- times, just far enough out of time to be
d annoying and not far enough to be un-
s related. During the quieter moments of
a the concert one could discern hum but
e this disappeared whenever anything
d was played halfway loud. ELP seemed
e to be enjoying themselves and the audi-
tence certainly got their monies worth.
- Hopefully the time shall come soon
e when we will see a return visit from this
s dynamic trio.

player Frank Vicari left the stage,
Waits announced, "We're sending
someone out to break his thumbs."
The concert ended with Waits
taking up an acoustic guitar and per-
forming a solid rendition of Putnam
County and Big Joe and the Phan-
tom 309. He introduced Putnam
County with an amusing description
of the town, where they have "one
doctor, with one leg, and one street,
that's one-way."
Waits and band returned for an
encore, performing the traditional
tune, Summertime, and concluding
with one of Waits' biggest hits, Tom
Traubert's Blues. It's a particularly
moving song about the emotional
"innocent victim," and Waits' per-
formance of it was simultaneously
sorrowful. and soothing. The satis-
fied crowd, most of whom hal
stayed to the four a.m. end, left
knowing they had seen a performer
of an outstanding, though unusual
calibre.
Waits continues to tour, bringing
his urban blues to consistently re-
ceptive audiences.It is his material,
as much as his performance of it,
that is establishing him as a popular
conveyor of America's seedy sub-
culture. His affected stage man-
nerisms are simply extensions of his
music, and he captivates audiences
with his alleyway aura. Although
Waits claims that he is "on the verge
of becoming a rumor in my spare
time," he is actually becoming a tat-
tered sensation.

(Continued from Page 5)
The first hand was an average re-
sult. I played four hearts and had pre-
cisely ten tricks. No swing to either
side. One more hand and Susie and I
could retire to discuss our game or
whatever else we liked.
I sorted through my twelve points and
excellent six-card suit and opened one
heart. South overcalled a spade, and
Susie, after making sure he had really
bid one of her five-card suits, passed.
North bid two clubs, I rebid my hearts,
and South trotted out a three diamond
bid.
The opponents having bid twelve of
her thirteen cards, Susie was under-
standably flustered. Finally she
passed. North preferred three spades
and South bid four. This was too much
for Susie who doubled on her two tricks,

five spades, and partner's bids.
Still nervous, her hand shook as she
led her singleton heart. ITquickly
cashed three tricks in the suit as Susie
discarded the ace and king of clubs! I
blinked, shrugged, and finally returned
a club. South trumped high, but had to
go down one because he only had four
remaining high trumps to pull my par-
tner's five. And down one was enough to
win the tournamenfor us.
"Down three, doubled," exclaimed
Susie. "Three hearts, the ace-king of
clubs, and my trump trick."
"Only down one, Susie," I corrected.
"You discarded your clubs."
"That's where they went!" She tur-
ned white. "I was so nervous and so in-

tent on winning tricks with them that I
played them too early. Oh Mark, I'm s'i
sorry !"
Now I'm not proud of what I said
next. I could have explained how her
play is the only way to beat the con-
tract: against any other defense, the
declarer can either ruff out the
diamond suit and draw trumps or else
crossruff for the rest of the tricks.
But I hadn't asked Susie to play in or-
der to compliment her card technique.
So instead I put an arm around her
shoulder and told her not to worry, that
everyone makes mistakes. And we left
with Susie still apologizing. I could pick
up the trophies later.

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Gdon
(Continued from Pages)
straight jazz, very direct, and he has
surrounded himself with extraordinary
players.-
Gordon followed with renditions of
such classics as Body and Soul, Jimmy
Heath's The Gingerbread Boy, Polka-
dots, and a soulful version of The Days
of Wine and Roses. Throughout each
number all quartet members had the
freedom to solo, and used their time
well. RufusReid proved himself to be
one of the best young bassists, in jazz
today, improvising extended solos with
a quality and style that is most rare..
Eddy Gladden on drums provided a
strong rhythmic base and interacted
frequently with Gordon on short, tight
solos. Cables' piano work, much remin-
iscent of McCoy Tyner's phrasings and
slashing style, was simply brilliant.
The quartet also played several of
Gordon's original compositions set in
the bebop mode and performed them.
with an energy and understanding that
brought out the best in jazz. The
musicians sincerely enjoyed playing,
relating to one another, and reacted
strongly to the overwhelming audience
support. Their performance was by far
the highlight of the Eclipse Jazz season.
Earlier in the day, Gordon spoke to a
student workshop on his life during the
bebop era and his reasons for leaving
the U.S. After rising quickly onto the
scene in the 1940's, Gordon experienced
serious personal problems in the 1950's
that were compounded by the fact that
the music he loved (bebop) declined-in
popularity. In 1962 he moved to
Copenhagen, clearly to escape some of
the problems that beset him in this
country.
"Europe has been a very pleasant
experience for me," he said, with deep
voice and charming smile, to an atten-
tive audience. "I make a good living
there, but more importantly, and the
thing that has attracted so many cats,
is the lifestyle there. You get respect as
an artist, as a human being. After being
there for a few months, I could take a
nice deep breath and relax for the first
time in my life."
Racial tensions and a lack of respect
for him as an artist alienated Gordon
from the United States, but, fortunate-
ly, he has returned and his music re-
mains uncompromised. Referring to
the more commercial jazz that is
currently popular in the country, Gor-
don laughed and said, "I don't even
know how to play that kind of music."
For the audience at Power Center,
that was a true blessing.

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1. Monday, Oct. 24, 4:00 p.m., 2404 Mason Hall
"Types of Religious Orthodoxy in lsrael"
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2. Monday, Oct. 24, 8:00 p.m., West Conference Room, Rackham
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Sponsored by Department of Anthropology and Studies in Religion
3. Tuesday, Oct. 25, 4:00 p.m., 2402 Mason Hall
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Sponsored by B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation

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