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October 20, 1977 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-10-20

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r

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, October 20, 1977-page 5
7g-
rica ilenes back oice

$ EARN EXTRA CASH
CASH PAID FOR YOUR BLOOD PLASMA NOW
DONORS EARN $50.00-$100.00 MONTHLY
OCTOBER BONUS DRAWINGS: 10-SPEED BIKES
tf you donate twice o week throughout October you will hove 4 chances to win!
Drawing October 31, 1977
Bring in this coupon and collect an extra 2.00 on your first donation
" Free medicalsex:mination
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U.S. says relatio
e f l i

(Continued from Page 1)'

p ceu A coexisence of peoples
South Africa is not disturbed by
small group of anarchists."

in
a

The Johannesburg Star, a major
voice of white liberals, said the.
government ."seems bent on trans-
forming moderate black opinion into
extremism."
The crackdown, the toughest in this
white-ruled nation since the early
1960s, came amid mounting attacks
on the government over the Sept. 12
prison death of Steve Biko, a major
South African black nationalist ac-
tivist.
JUSTICE Minister James Kruger
said that the government was mov-
ing against organizations, news-
papers and people being used to
create a "revolutionary climate"
and a black-white confrontation.
He said those detained in the raids
would be held in "preventive deten-
tion" until the situation has "re-
turned to normal."'
Warning of even tougher mea-
sures, Kruger said: "The govern-
ment is determined to ensure that the

THE GOVERNMENT measures
provoked an immediate outcry from
blacks and liberal whites and raised
fears of a violent backlash.
Black primary school children
began streaming out of classes in
Soweto in protest. Armed police
arrested at least 50 white students
from the Witwatersrand University
converging on a post office near
central Johannesburg to send protest
telegrams to Prime Minister John
Vorster..
The newspapers banned were the
World and its sister publication, the
Weekend World, published in Johan-
nesburg. The World, South Africa's
major black newspaper, has a circu-
lation of 160,000, but it is estimated to
have at least a million readers.
ITS EDITOR, Percy Qoboza, was
seized by plainclothesmen at the.
paper's offices shortly before he was

nis may
scheduled to hold a news conference.
Weekend World news editor Aggrey
Klaaste was picked up overnight.
The 18 black and interracial organ-
izations banned were generally re-
garded as moderate and nonviolent.
All the militant black organizations
have already been banned and their
leaders jailed.
Those ordered banned included two
organizations linked to Biko - the
Black People's Convention (BPC)
and the South African Students
Organization, as well as the Christian
Institute and the Soweto Students'
Representative Council.
THOSE DETAINED included BPC
President Hlaku Rachidi and Roman
Catholic leader the Rev. Patrick
Mkhatshwa. The whites banned for
five years were Christian Institute
Director Beyers Naude and two.
colleagues; Donald Woods, the out-
spoken editor of the East London
daily Dispatch, and two Cape Town
clergymen.
Banned persons are restricted to

ufer
their hometowns, may not have visi-
tors without official permission and
can't be quoted in the press. The
white-owned World was sharply criti-
cal of the government and highlight-
ed black grievances, boycotts and
unrest. But it advocated nonviolence
throughotut the nationwide rioting of
1976 and this year's black school
boycott to protest the segregated
education system.
PRIOR TO closing the newspapers,
Kruger had filed four complaints
against the World and other opposi-
tion newspapers for their "unfair and
malicious" coverage of Biko's death.
But the complaints had not come
before the regulatory liress Council
before the raids.
THE OVERNMENT'S leading
critic in parliament, Helen Suzman,
said the actions were a "complete
admission by the government that it
is -unable to govern the country
without resorting to absolute despot-
ism.

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ENGINEERING

Regents review $130 million budget plan

(Continued from Page 1)
priations on the Ann Arbor campus
from $100 million to $130 million this
year. The request also asks for
$2,400,000 increase for the. Dearborn
campus and $1,700,000 more for the
Flint campus.
One reason for the tremendous
jump in state aid is a faculty and
staff raise of 12.55 per cent which
costs the University $19 million in

wages. The budget also calls for a $2
million increase in health insurance,
workers compensation, and social
security benefits for employees on
all three campuses.
Yesterday, after months of plan-
ning, student leaders learned of a
new possibility in the search for more
building space for student activities
-- the Argus Building, four blocks
west of Main Street on East William,

Lauer narrowly wins
new MSA presidency

(Continued from Page 1)
"IF WE DO. (take the money out),
we're taking a stand. That's one thing
MSA has failed to do often enough," he
said.
Bachelder alos supported withdrawal
of the money: "I would vote to divest
ourselves should it be shown that the
investment fund invests money in cor-
porations involved in South Africa," he
said:

Other MSA action dealt with the
allocation of office space to student
organizations and the passage of
guidelines concerning CIA activities on
campus.
A number of students from'
organizations which had been denied
space addressed the assembly and ex-
pressed interest in a reassessment of
the situation.
Jasper DiGuiseppe, chairman of the
Student Organizations B ard, announ-
ced a meeting on Friday, October 21, at'
8:00 a.m. to deal with the complications
which have arisen from the allocation
of space. "We've determined that we
want'to hear the complaints and con-
structive criticisms of each group that
has a grievance. It won't be decision
time; we just want to compile data," he
said.

which the University purchased in
the mid-1960s. The University's tele-
vision center occupies part of the
building.
"IT'S IDEALLY suited for what we
need," said Scott Kellman, former
president of the Michigan Student
Assembly. He added that although
the size of the building and its
facilities are well-suited for a num-
ber of student projects and rehear-
sals, it is too far from campus, about
three quarters of a mile, to be used
without bus service provided by the
University. A shuttle bus would cost
as much as $70,000 a year, Kellman
said.
But according to James Brinker-
hoff, vice president for financial af-
fairs, "There are a number of
functions down there already," in-,
cluding audio-visual classes and
education programs. "If there isn't a
shuttle bus down there already, it
could be easily accommodated," said
Brinkerhoff.
In addition to student space, the
Regents will consider adopting poli-
cies on freedom of speech and
campus recruitment recommended
by two faculty groups earlier this
yegr.
IN JANUARY, the Senate Advi-
sory Committee on University Af-
fairs (SACUA) drew up ten guide-
lines to protect freedom of speech on
campus. The guidelines would give
responsibility for enforcement to
President Fleming.

The Senate Assembly asked in
March that "no career planning and
placement services will be made
available to any company or organ-
ization that discriminates in recruit-
ment or employment practices . .
Unlike the faculty representatives,
the student Housing Council is not
asking for the adoption of specific
policies, but that the Regents:
-Make housing a top priority.
-Take action to stop the alleged
deterioration of the housing situ-
ation.
-Meet with members of the Coun-
cil to discuss housing.

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EDUCATION: BS degree in Engineering. An Engingerring
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