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September 08, 1977 - Image 45

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-08

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THE MICHIGAN DMLY-

Doge

THE MICHIGAN DAiLY Page

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Flipping,
{S 3

flinging abound

By STU McCONNELL
Big intellectual town, right?
Women in Gucci -designs and men
with pipes standing around discussing
Sartre. Symphonies. Dance. Thursday
seminars on African problems. Goethe
over breakfast, sassafras tea and
Schiller in the afternoon, white wine
and Fellini after dinner.
WHAT'S A POOR degenerate to do?
Well, if you've played the silver
ball ever since you were a young boy
(or young girl, for that matter), there
is probably a wonderfully sleazy pin-
ball arcade only a quarter's throw
away.
Actually, you could go out and beat
up pedestrians or spray paint DES-
TROY ALL TRUCKS on freeway over-
passes, but pinball accomplishes the
same thnig-and for only a quarter.
It's a release of tension.
LOCAL PINBALL emporiums ir-
clude Campus Pinball, under the
floodlit "M" on S. University; The
Cross-Eyed Moose, under the red neon
on E. Liberty; Tommy's, under the
glare of the traffic lights at Packard
and State; Arcade 5. under the A-
frame roof on Church; and Mickey
Rat's, above Tech Hifi on E. William.
A number of bars-notably Second

7I city
Chance and Dooley's-feature game
rooms with pinball machines and foos-'
ball tables, and those whose particular
fetish is pinball and laundry can check
out Yung's, a Packard St. pinball/
pool hangout which is attached to a
laundromat.
But beware of the bar machines. As
if the odds against the sporting drunk
were not long enough already, many
bars set the "tilt" mechanisms of
their machines very lightly so as to
avoid/injuries to the machines from
intoxicated customers.
MANY OF the arcades offer come
ons to attract business. In the fall,
Topmy's offers free pinball in ex-
change for football ticket stubs, and
both Tommy's and the 'Moose have a
"pizza machine," which wins the
week's champ a pizza at Pizza Bob's.
Some arcades offer free hours of pin-
ball and foosball and set up foosball:
championships.
Perhaps the most entertaining gim-
mick was one offered by the Moose>
last year-free pinball to the first cus-
tomer in the morning. One can ima-
gine the die-hard pinball addict set- t
ting his alarm clock for 10 a.m. and
dragging himself to the door just as=
it opens. But for most, it's a late-=
See PINBALL, Page 6

A2:

By EILEEN DALEY
Ann Arbor appears to be a
haven for bicyclists. Bike paths
weave in and out of the city,
curbs are conveniently sloped to
permit sidewalk riding in heavy
auto traffic areas, and fellow
bicyclists abound.
It is at least as easy, if not
easier, to travel between any
two points by bicycle than by
car. Bicycles can avoid the
spider's web of one-way streets.
which run haphazardly through
the city, and parking is rarely
a problem for the creative cy-
clist who can chain his two-
wheeled companion to any near-
by pole or post.

shaped types-generally run be stores provide service, generally
tween $20 and $30 but come with for reasonable prices, but shop
an insurance policy which pays around. More independent cycl-
upwards of $100 if a properly- ists can pay a $1 membership
locked bicycle is stolen. Don't fee and join the Naked Wrench
lock-;-they can be opened with a Bicycle Co-op, located in the
lock-they can be opened wth a basement of the Student Activi-
piece of string and a quick flick ties Building, w h i c h entitles
of the wrist. them to use of tools, lubricants
and instruction on bicycle repair
THE BEST BET-for retrieving methods. Co-op members also
a stolen bicycle is to license it organize bike trips occasionally.
with the Ann Arbor police. For Bicyclists who prefer to plot
only $5 the bicycle serial num- their own course can pick up a
ber and description are recorded packet of maps and guides to
at City Hall, increasing the the area's bike paths at City
chances that a ripped-off bike Hall. Ann Arbor is the only city
may eventually return home, in the state which appropriates
Bicycle repair is not a prob- money for construction and ex-
lem in the city. Most local bike pansion of bicycle paths.

Bicycists haven?

Daily Photo by ALAN BILINSKY
John Ballard plays the silver ball at one of the many pinball palaces lo--
cated around campus while Patty Regetz looks on.

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BUT THE Ann Arbor bicyclist,
for all the ready-made conven-
iences, faces hazards every day.
Inattentive motorists often pow-
er their gas-guzzlers around cor-
ners with little regard for pedal-
propelled drivers. The endless
caverns known as Ann Arbor's.
streets can wreak havoc on bi-
cyclestires, or worse, a cyclist
may find himself disappearing
into a chuckhole, never to re-I
turn.
The biggest foe of the 'city
biker is still the thief, although
reported thefts have dropped in
recent years-1,355 in 1973, 678
in 1976. Particularly on campus,
any bicycle which is not firmly
anchored to an immobile object,
preferably something as sturdy
as a tree (but then again, trees
can be cut down), risks not be-
ing there when its owner re-
turns. Cautious bicyclists have
managed to 'solve this problem
in three ways-walk, purchase a
bicycle which looks like it came
out of Grandmother's back shed
(Uncle Ralph's boyhood bike),
or invest in a locl and chain
which is as close as possible to
foolproof.
The numerous bicycle shops
in Ann Arbor (nine to be exact)
are quick to point out that while
there are no thief-proof locks,
sore are safer than others. The
be'st locks-the cable or U-

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onfessions of a park groupie

BANJOS
GI BSON
HARMONY
VEGA
MORRIS

By LANI JORDAN
I get really freakedsout by
closed-in spaces. I have a 12-
hour tolerance for multi-storied
buildings and rows of parked
cars. After that, if I don't see
trees in large groups and some
semblance of a body of water
within a reasonable period of
time, I d e v e l o p withdrawal
symptoms. My skin crawls, my
eyes glass over and I begin
scanning the horizon for refuge
-preferably the w i d e open
spaces, but a park will do.
For this reason, I opted to live
on North Campus-nothing more
than a park with a few buildings
-during my first two years at
the University. Seeing the trees
and squirrels out my window
each morning was comforting
to be sure, and allowed me to
survive my days on the Central
Campus pavement. North Cam-
pus itself had its disadvantages,
though-the dorm got to be a
zoo after two years and tended
to be inconvenient.
Being a resourceful person, I
finally concluded that there was
a solution to my problem-move
to Central Campus and become
an Ann Arbor park groupie.
ANN ARBOR is truly one of
the better places to be if you
love the wide open spaces but
are forced to spend most of
your time doing things. which
occur in large buildings-like go-
ing to school. Innumerable
apes of parks dot almost every
area of the city, each with its
own special attributes and at-
mosphere. Within a 15 or 20 min-
ute drive of civilization, larger
expanses of green space, often.
surrounding a river or lake, pro-
vide relief for those 'afflicted
with concrete fever.
But possibly the best park

area in Ann Arbor is the Nichols
Arboretum, affectionately known
as The Arb. This University-
owned acreage, bordered by
Geddes Road, the Medical Cen-
ter and. the Huron River, is a1
well-known hang-out for every-
one from biology and landscape
architecture classes to frisbee
freaks to strolling (and some-
times not strolling) couples to
park groupies.
No matter what time of year,
the Arb is a place of seemingly
undisturbed beauty. On a crisp,
autumn afternoon, there is noth-
ing better than crunching your
way down the leaf-strewn Arb
paths. Winter brings the "tray-
ers," complete with cafeteria-
ware from every dorm on cam-
pus. Sprin g and summer see the,
onslaught of frisbee freaks who
utilize any open space to perfect
their saucer tossing, as well as
sun-worshippers and semi-dedi-
cated studiers.
BECAUSE it is an endless
maze of paths which lead no-
where and everywhere, new-
comers to the Arb often get tem-
porarily lost. Visiting the Arb
alone at night is not advisable,
as many of its paths drop sharp-
ly at the edge of hills.
Island Park, bordered by Full-
er Road, only a short jaunt from
the Medical Center, is a pleasant
place to be on a warm night.
The Huron River winds its way
peacefully through the park, of-
ten filled with canoeists on
weekends. Island Park is also
frequented by soccer teams
which use the goal posts ttye
city has installed.
Adjacent to Island Park is the
Fuller complex, one of the city's
finer recreational centers. Al-
though the University provides
severial indoor swimming pools,
Yost Arena for ice-skating, and
innumerable tennis courts, those
same facilities, out of doors at

323 So Main St Anti Arbor
769.1400
EASY TERMS-LAYAWAY
Mon., Wed., Fri. till 9 p.m.

HERB

DAVID

WORLD FAMOUS
MAKER & DEALER
IN MUSICAL

a
1

Daily Photo by ALAN BLII
This sort of splendor in the grass may not be exactly the type of relaxation you're lookin
but the many Ann Arbor parks can provide a convenient escape from the concrete blues
Fuller, take on a different char- From late May until Septem- rond, swings, slides an
acter. ber, Fuller's over-sized pool of- tables.
fers the same rates. Special Gallup Park, at Huro
FULLER ICE, rink is one of swimming hours for adults are way and Geddes, alr
the more magical, spots to be in
winter. At 430 on a weekday available and only on the hottest pears Japanese in des
afternoon, when the sun is just days does the pool become un- intricate series of curve
disappearing and the lights are bearably crowded. en brdges link the smal
coming on, a budding Dorothy Each of the city's other parks, which dot the Huron F
Hamill can do figure eights to while more difficult to reach the mainland. A two-m
her heart's delight as the snow except by car or a long bicycle bike path connects th
falls softly on the often-empty ride, offer a unique atmosphere. with campus.
rink. Weekends are more crowd- Veteran's Park on Jackson Rd.
ed-for only 75 cents, skaters features a year 'round indoor'
can spend up to four hours on ice rink and an outdoor pool.
Fuller's well - maintained ice. Buhr Park on Packard has an
Skating fanatics can purchase outdoor ice rink. Various small-
a $10 season pass at Parks and er parks are also scattered
Recreation in City Hall and throughout the city, each fea
skate until they turn blue. turing the usual baseball dia-

INST RUMENTS
IN
r ~C
209 S. Stat

GUITAR Si
lINSLIIUIIENtS'
LESSONS
JSTOM 1Q.

rUIO
HISTQRIC
MODERN
FOREIGN
DOMESTIC
SALES
RENTAL
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USED
musIc
FOLK
CLASSIC
ELECTRIC

HONE 665-81 PTSUN
pAn Arbor (upstairs)

[E Ma Mo

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oo0eyS,

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happen
ca l

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AND DINNERS
Now Featuring
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WELCOME

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FAMOUS FOR:
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