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October 09, 1977 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-10-09

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m

>er 9, 1977-The Michigan Daily
ulance service: quic,

Wa.... U 1U TiTCr QA

will be several weeks before enc
ne knows which firm will handle
htenaw County's emergency am- er
nce service next year, but county a
ials already predict sweet and ;am
results - increased ride rates in
led with improved service for
residents..
hey (the rates) will probably be o
sted up a bit," said Richard ta
s, county emergency medical vic
ice coordinator.
Vi
E COUNTY now .pays a flat $50 red
ide, plus additional charges for ad
ical services and equipment use. coc
irding to Muhs the prices are in se
'competitive scale" with othersE
nunities. bu
e County Corporation Council re
:e is currently accepting bids for co
year's ambulance service. The re
ract with Horne-Vinson Ambu- co
e Inc., the current contract w
er, expires December 31. of
unty officials would like to nego-
a three-year agreement but I
n't decided yet on the contract. E
are considering cutting service (I
five 24-hour vehicles to two sta
oned in Chelsea and Saline. If th
choose the second alternative, pr
lents would have to contact a co
ate firm in the event of an po
rgency. co
co
CORDING TO acting University ani
pital Emergency Director Rich-
Burney, private companies do
station vehicles at Chelsea or fro
. -,.:

aline because. "they do not have:
ough runs to support themselves."
The County Board of Commission-
s could choose not to issue an
nbulance contract at all, but instead
y private firms for transportation of
digent automobile crash victims.
Under state law, the county is
ligated to pay for the transporta-
n of indigent automobile accident
etims on local roadways.
'CERTAINLY THEY (Horne-
nson) have fulfilled their contract
quirements," Burney said. But he
ided, "the kind of service that the
unty pays for is the same kind of
rvice that they will get."
Burney said county-contracted am-
ulance :service has an average.
sponse time of 10 minutes as
mpared with the five minute
sponse time of services in other
unties. Both response rates are
ell below the state-suggested time
30 minutes.
Burney, a member of the Michigan-
m e r g e n c y' Health Council,
IEHC), is working with a special
ate sub-committee in determining
e needs of the county. MEHC has
reviously suggested to the county
mmissioners that a non-profit cor-
ration be set up to provide the
unty with ambulance service. This
rporation would operate on state
nd federal tax support.,
HORNE-VINSON took over service
om Fontana-Taylor had provided
114 E. Washington
Domntown
Ann Arbor
665-3231

county service from 1972 to 1976 with
an annual subsidy of $110,000.
When the contract expired, Horne-
Vinson won the bidding war with a
two-year contract for $135,000 with
annual county subsidies. Fontana-
Taylor wanted $425,000 a year for the
same service.
It appears both firms will again be
calling foraneincreased subsidyrthis
year. George Vinson, partner in

k, costly
Horne-Vinson, would only say that an
increased subsidy was "possible."'
The two are the only ambulance
firms based in Ann Arbor.
Eliot Striar from the County Cor-
poration Council Office said October
28 is the cut-off date for all bid
documents. A special county sub-
committee will consider the appliga-
tions before the County Board of
Commissioners makes the final deci-
sion.

Papyrus yields story
of cultures long dead

of
(EDI
Sirica,
major 1
day afte
U.S. D
ever, Si
judge, '
cases he
WAS]
journey
structo
imprint
The
from r
judge
style tU
trials fI
figure f
the Whi
"For
privileg
great t
have ca
in som
respons
ica sai
madep
House.
SIRIC
ter of t
cution
ruling

merican justice
TOR'S NOTE: Judge John coverup conspirators H.R. Halde-
man, John Ehrlichman and John
who presided over every Mitchell in exchange for their taped
Watergate trial, resigned Fri- confessions of wrongdoing.
er more than 20 years on the "This is my last ruling," the busly
)istrict Court bench. How- browed, 5-foot-6 inch judge told the
rica will remain as a "senior courtroom without mentioning that
ric wllreai a ahe already had given the White!a
' picking and choosing the House his letter of resignation.
wants.) President Carter praised Sirica,
HINGTON ( UPI) -The Langbut like the judge, made no mention
frIGoN UI)-Te ogof Watergate.
fro part-time boxing in- _
r to federal court judge left its
t on John Sirica to the last. SIRICA IS "a lasting symbol of
73-year-old jurist resigned unflinching devotion to duty," Carter
egular service as a federal said.
with the same no-nonsense "You have been given an opportun-
hat marked his handling of ity afforded to few of us who enter
for every major Watergate public service to exhibit, at a time of
from bush league burglars to the greatest challenge to our system
te House brass, of government, the personal courage
over 20 years now I have been and wisdom needed to sustain it."
ged to serve as a judge of this Sirica, known locally as "Maxi-
ribunal and can only hope I mum John" because he gave crimin-
ntributed to and measured up als everything the law allowed, pre-
e slight degree to the high sided over every major Watergate
sibilities thus imposed," 'Sir- trial since the break-in at the Demo-
d in a letter of resignation cratic National, Headquarters in
public Friday by the White June, 1972.
CA HAD closed the final chap- HE IS GENERALLY credited with
he 5 -year Watergate prose- cracking the original cover-up by his
earlier in the week with a skeptical, sometimes bullying rejec-
reducing the sentences of tions of the burglars' cover story.

Sirica:

'lasting symboU

x
i
p
F
4
p
4
t
w
X
i
f
t
t
Y

---------CLIP AND SAVE--------
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114 E. WASHINGTON
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(Continued from Page 1)
THE PAPYRI can be divided into
two major categories, literature and
non-literature. Although it was used
throughout the Mediterranean re-
gion, only in Egypt has the dry
climate kept it preserved until today.
Fragments from Homer's works
are the most common find of the first
division, since he was the most
studied author in ancient Egyptian
schools. The second category is
comprised of documents which make
up the majority.
Youtie feels the great value of the
papyri lies in their contributions to
economic and religious histories of
the ancient world.
EGYPT, UNTIL very recently,
was always a conquered country.
Pharoahs, the Persians, the Greeks,
Romans, and Arabs all held Egypt
for a time. We have volumes and
volumes of tax records that were
stored in the archives of the regional
capitals. The point was to get out
what you could, and that's what we
call taxation," Youtie said.
The job of the papyrologist is to aid
in recreating the structure of ancient
civilizations - no easy task. Simply
understanding the papyri involves a
time-consuming, frustrating process.
Written rapidly in pen, many times
by people unaccustomed to using
THE
FREE UNIVERSITY.
OF IRAN
The Free University of Iron is cur-
rently accepting applications from
Iranian nationals who have com-
pleted or who are pursuing gradu-
ate degrees in the following fields:
education, psychology, economics,
sociology, anthropoloigy, health
sciences, natural sciences, physical
sciences, mathematics and TESL.
In addition to employment opportu-
nities a limited number of scholar-
ships are available for those candi-
dates who will be finishing their
studies within the near future.
Additional information on the
Free University and request
forms for applications can be
obtained from Mr..Jamnes Mont-
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sor, International Center, 603 E.
Madison Street.

letters, the documents are isolated
fragments of ancient civilizations we
know little about, The language of
most is "koine," the dead tongue of
the common Greek people. Again,
little is known of its intricacies.
THE PAPYRUS Youtie is current-
ly working on, a letter from about the
third century A.D., is a scribbled
mess with an impressive rip splitting
its center.
"I like to pick material to work on
by looking for legibility and intrinsic
interest," he said. "This piece would
be no real problem if it weren't for
the tear. Unfortunately, each sheet
has its own particular problem.,
"When I first pick up a papyrus I
don't try to ,read it letter by letter or
even word by word. I look for phrases
I recognize - 'I hereby lease' for
example. Then I can look at other
eases that have already been tran-
scribed, see what the form is and
know what to expect."
EVEN SO, Youtie called his aver-
age of one sheet every two weeks
"pretty competend."
Another problem is fitting each
individual papyrus into a workable
conception of the whole civilization.
For example, data on illegitimate
children confused papyrologists for a
.long time.
"If you believe the extensive
records on illegitimate children, you
wonder why we have accumulated so
many marriage contracts. But, by
reading personal correspondences,
we have discovered there were many
legal restrictions on who could
marrt," explained the professor.
"THUS MANY people were living
together as if married, considered by
everyone nearby to be married, but.
their children were registered as
bastards in the birth records,'' he,
said.
The word "papyrus".forms the
root of our word "paper". From
papyrus to paper, the world has been
revolutionized.
"From the papyrus, we can follow
a progression to the present. It may
not be progress, but it certainly is a
progression;" Youtie remarked.
The average American consumes
125 pounds of sugar yearly, accord-
ing to the Diet Workshop. This
compares with 109 pounds of beef.

Stalling on abortion:

"
eommit~ltee
(Continued from Page 1)
accounts and new hiring has been cur-
tailed.
A congressional agreement is
unlikely in time to assure full salaries
for the affected employes. The House
leaders and conference committee
members say a House vote can be ex-
pected Wednesday or Thursday. The
employes can be reimbursed retroac-
tivelyonce the bill is enacted.
The House conferees arranged to
delay the House vote by a week. Rep.

Daniel Flood (D-Pa.), their chairman,
said the objective was to gain support in
both houses for the House conferees'
position.
These abortions are paid for through
programs such as Medicaid aiid Social
Services. Some $50 million was spent
last year to pay for 300,000 of them,
HEW estimates.
IN ITS FIRST vote on the issue in
June, the House agreed to bar all
federal funding of poor women's abor-
tions.

Patching up the plan:

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St. Patrick's Day, Fri. 8 Sot. ,or on Dcily Speclczs.
Membership cards are available to you and your friends at
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Entertainment Every Fri. & Sat.
Expires May 30, 1978
CoANe Se FO ur
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congressional
(Continued from Page 1) rate structu
Senate Democratic leaders have casualties.
devised several strategies involving Earlier, th
conference committees, to try to of the mina
salvage some of the natural gas pricing measures pr
and tax portions of the President's but made a
plan: coal-convers
-THE EXPECTED naming to the
natural gas conference committee of a
majority of Senate negotiators who are
sympathetic to the President's plan for
continued price controls, even though
the Senate voted for a rival plan to life
the price restrictions. -- *
-Letting the Senate pass an energy s I1
tax bill that contains= none of Carter's
tax plans in hopes conferees will e
produce a compromise tax package
tailored to win both Senate and House
approval.
At week's end, the President's energy
proposals, which had sailed so easily S l
through the House last August, were, in
the words of Sen. Abraham A. Ribicoff
(D-Cann.) "in a shambles." (c
As the Senate delivered final blows to
the nontax portions of the plan, its feeding rat
Finance Committee was busy killing off programmi
the remaining tax proposals. Little of in wind tu
Carter's plan was left standing. Car- audio-visua
ter's plan to keep price lids on natural World War]
gas and to force utilities to revise their

res were the latest Senate
he Senate did approve some
nor energy conservation
roposed by the President,
major modification in his
lion program.

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Sackle

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GENEVA TREATY CONFERENCE AND MAINE LAND RIGHTS
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ENVIRONMENTAL ISSiES-Coyete-Nat. Resources, 4 p.m. H
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ADRIAN CHAVEZ, a Quiche (Mayan) elder and man of knowledge.
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ontinued from Page 1)
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to get a Work Study job --
you qualify, according to.
an, clerk-receptionist iri
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nd not enough students,"
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o has demonstrated finan-
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