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October 07, 1977 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-10-07

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 7, 1977-Page 5'

Me ire les
By MARK JOHANSSON movemn
can spe
control
Tuesday night Maria Meirelles con- played
cluded a project she began nearly a The S
month ago: the presentation of all thir- sonata
ty-two Beethoven piano sonatas. While tions in
commemorating the 150th anniversary tional a
of Beethoven's death, Meirelles be- played
came the first person ever to perform and en
the entire set in Ann Arbor. dynami
The recitals were a great success; clear. T
with each performance the audiences never 1
got larger and more enthusiastic.
Tuesday's was certainly the biggest see
and probably the most considerate.
They seemed to really .appreciate the
artist's talent. Also, as the recitals con- Prog
tinued, Meirelles seemed to be increas- son
ingly aware of the audiences and made Sona
better attempts to communicate with
them. . just .eno
Tuesday's program began with the Here Be
Sonata op. 28, in D (Pastoral). The Al- great le
legro had an extremely even tempo, but ,rhythms
midway through, things got a little the trills
shakey - no major problems, just Meire.
some rough scales and a few missed flat, op.
notes. In the Andante, the melody was ble. She
strong and good dynamics empha- sively th
sized the tension and release. The han- in each
ds played perfectly together on the actly in t
chords in the Scherzo, and the contrast She use
between the buoyant, dancing figures Scherzo
and the crashing, descending chords was bea
was expressed very well. Meirelles sound o
played the Rondo with solid, powerful clean an

finishes up

r

ents, and although the tempo
eed up easily, she kept it under
. Also, the arpeggios were
particularly evenly.
onata in c, op. 111, was the last
Beethoven wrote. The varia-
the Maestoso-Allegro are emo-
nd very complex, and Meirelles
with equal parts of technique
motion. She used excellent
cs and the texture sounded very
The melody of the Arietta was
ost, always present - singing
thoven: 32 Planosonatas, Part VIII
Rackham Auditorium
Maria Meirelles, pianist
dram:
ta op. 28 in D (Pastoral)
ta op. illminc
ta op. 31, no. 3in E-flat
ta op. 78, in F-sharp
ugh over the accompaniment.
ethoven developed his ideas to
ngths and despite the difficult
s, the tempo was controlled and
excellently executed.
lles performed the Sonata in E-
31, no. 3, as perfectly as possi-
played confidently and aggres-
hroughout the entire piece, and
movement the notes were ex-
tempo, and each one was heard.
d dynamic varieties well in the
, and in the menuetto her tone
utifully warm and mellow. The
of the Presto was incredibly
nd the runs and arpeggios very

good.
The Sonata op. 78, in F-sharp, the one
Beethoven declared to be his favorite,
concluded the series. In the Adagio,
Meirelles played beautifully, communi-
cated well, and everything seemed in
place. The ornamentation was §olid and
blended nicely with the melody. She
used a wide range of dynamics and
tones in the Allegro, and the movement
sounded unified.
After finally finishing her month long
program, Meirelles smiled and took
four long bows to a standing ovation.
We have been fortunate to be able to
hear a lady with so much talent.
Perhaps the best word to describe the
performances of Meirelles is consisten-
cy. I was continually amazed as she
played each sonata nearly perfect. She
never stopped or lost her place, and is
not a note dropper. When playing oc-
taves, she never misjudged an interval
leap and she never played a wrong
chord. Simply, she made no obvious
mistakes.
Next month, Meirelles intends to
travel to several South American cities
to present recitals, including the 32
Beethoven sonatas.

MARSHALL'S
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235 S. STATE AT E. LIBERTY

L

Maria Meirelles

I

U-

FALL
PREVIEW
Beer Depot now carries
choice Deli Meats and

Hands Across Sea

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Cheeses, inc
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cud ing such

VER YNoel Coward

By MARK LLOY
In the autumn of 1935, i
flat, an assortment of obvi
goois couples assemble fo
than an hour. They seem to
iAg in mind particularly, an
pprticuiar to say, but they
vay. And if the dialogue we
a - Hands Aeross tiA Sea
Anderson Rn., Mich. Uni
A play by Noel Cowar
tier ............ . J
alters ................... o
L~ady Maureen Gilpin.... ....
Geter Gilpin.......... ....
astair Corbett............... B
rs. Wadhurst .............
M$r. Wadhurst ...................
1r. Burnham ...............
care Wedderburn ........r.... Ju
Major Gosling ..............
Directed by Tom Shak
ten by Noel Coward we ce
iave it at that.
: In the first Studio Sdries p
this fall, and I must say q
rected by Tom Shaker, Co
act "high" comedy Hands
Sea was given a bloody go
ance by all involved, notal
Stucki playing Lady Mau

D And what was of special enjoyment
was that one had something to think
n a London about after the laughter died down,
ously bour- which is unfortunately rare with many
r no more comedies. The laughter in Hands
have noth- Across the Sea is prompted by the b'e-
d nothing in wilderment of a colonial couple from
say it any- the east, what was then part of the
ere not writ- British colonial empire, as they are
catapulted into the life of bourgeois
London where trivia and idle gossip is
on enthroned, hospitality and kindness is
.d apparent sham, and, incidently, Hitler
John E. Burgess amasses power not nearly enough kilo-
)rel Janiszewski meters away.
Rebecca Stucki'
.: Terry Cana But all this mention of the
enedict Staione playwright's intention would be
.... Sheri Stein
... John Frank meaningless of the lines and nuances
.... John Heiss were obscured by a poor performance.
liette Hunebelle Th
.. David Manis e cast is deserving of a rousing round
er of applause, and we can only say that
we hope to see them all again . ,:
And, by the way, the Studio Theatre
uld perhaps Series productions just may prove:to be
a most interesting theatre in town this
roduction of semester. A Doll's House by Ibsen will
uite ably di- open in Ann Arbor at the Arena on the
ward's one- 19th of October, and Shaw's The Dark
Across the Lady of the Sonnets will follow on the
od perform- 26th. So, if you have a free late after-
bly Rebecca noon, do yourself a favor - you can't
reen Gilpin beat the price.

See more
Arts on
Page 9
GAY ACADEMIC
UNION
}Noon Brown Bag
Monday, October 10
"Being a Lesbian or a Gay
Man in A2 and the Univer-
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at
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612 S Forest, B
(off S. University)
COMING UP: October 24
"Are Lesbians and Gay Men
Fighting the Same Enemy?"
For info coll: 763-4186 or 665-8838

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We carry the Ann Arbor News, Detroit Free Press, Detroit News,
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Chicago

WE TAKE YOUR RETURNABLES
HOURS: 'MON-THURS 9 am-1 am. FRI-SAT 9 am.-1:30 am. SUN 12-12
CORNER OF WIL LIAM AND FOURTH-NO 8-7191

a

,.... S

.....
.
.
(.
N
i~,. di

It -

a.k.a. Piggie.
High comedy, as opposed to "black,"
"slapstick," or "farce" has been, I
believe, a specialty of the British. It is
dry, wry, and witty. It is always funny,
although one does not always know
precisely why. Coward, Wilde, and
Shaw stand alone in this genre, and
they make it as important, and promi-
rent in the world of theatre as it has,
without question, become.
The perpetual problem with these
plays is pace, particularly the piling of
palaver which occurs frequently in the
plays of Coward. If the actors and ac-
tresses do not enunciate, one can lose
the drift of occuring events. Needless to
say, that is nothing less than the ulti-
mate peril for a one-act play. But
Blaker's cast coped with this chore and
entertained the Michigan Union's An-
derson Room with a fast and funny per-
formance.-
Just for the
health of it.
Get moving, America!
March 1-7 1977 is
National Physical Education and Sport Week
Physical Education Public inlormation
American Alliance for Health.
Physical Education and Recreation
1201 16th St N W Washington. D C 20036

* * VALUABLE cOuPON *
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. 1327 S. University
Offer good for pickup only
Ct 132T e.xUniversity lotion onl 70
Coupon expires October 13, 1977 NO DELIVERY!

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Scenes historiques, Op. 25 ;;
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'<.': SYMPHONIES '-
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THE PARTY'S OVER.

All too often, when the
party ends, the trouble begins.

And don't kid yourself
because they may have had

, RxlNK I4IVER. DET. Y
BO3(X 2345-- --....__._ ._ _.

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