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October 06, 1977 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan boily-Thursday, October 6, 1977-Pag'9-

DODGERS SLAM PHILLIES, 7-1

KC serves

Yankees

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Hal McRae, John
Mayberry and Al Cowens slugged
home runs yesterday, powering the
Kansas City Royals to a 7-2 victory
over the New York Yankees in the
opening game of the American
League playoff series.
Little Freddie Patek doubled home
two other Kansas City runs as the
Royals made quick work of Yankees''
ace Don Gullett, knocking him out in
just two innings. Paul Splittorff rode
the heavy support to an easy victory
that gave the Royals a vital jump in

the best-of-five championship play-
off.
'he home runs by McRae and
Mayberry were two-run shots, while
Cowens tagged a solo homer. Thur-
man Munson accounted for the
Yankees scoring with a third-inning
homer.
The Royals wasted no time against
Gullett, whose 14-4 record during the
regular season gave him the best
winning percentage in the American
League.
Patek, leading off the game,
walked on four pitches, and when

Gullett's first pitch to McRae also
was a ball, Manager Billy Martin
paid a hasty, visit to the pitcher.
Gullett got strikes on his next two
pitches, but then McRae got all of the
next one, sending it over the 387-foot
sign in left field for a quick 2-0 lead.
Gullett retired the first two batters
in the second inning, but then walked
Darrel Porter and the Royals' catch-
er slid safely into second when Frank
White's infield single backed up
Graig Nettles and the Yankee third
baseman's throw to second was a bit
late.

oaRo y
That brought up Patek, the major
league's smallest player at 5-foot-4.
He ripped a shot inside the third base
line and Porter scored easily.
New York left fielder Lou Piniella,
thinking the ball was a ground rule
double, eased up on it, and when third
base coach Chuck Hiller noticed that,
he frantically waved White home.
The Yankees argued briefly over the
call by third base umpire Nick
Bremigan, but,alike everything else
on the sun-splashed day, it went
against New York.
At the start of the third inning,
Dick Tidrow was' on the mound for
the Yankees with Gullett finished
after four runs, four hits and two
walks in just two innings.
With one out in the third, Cowens,
who finished with three hits, beat out
a single up the middle. Tidrow got
Amos Otis on a fly ball, but the
muscular Mayberry powered the
next pitch well beyond the 353-
foot sign in right field and the Royals'
lead was 6-0.
The Yankees scored in the bottom
of the third when Mickey Rivers, who
had three of the eight hits allowed by
Splittorff opened with a single and
Munson drove the next pitch into the
lower seats in left field. One out later,
Piniella backed Cowens to the right
field wall for his long drive that had
the crowd of 54,930 on its feet.
New York wasted Willie Ran-
dolph's two-out double in the fourth
and Cowens made a leaping catch of
Rivers' home run bid in the fifth.
Meanwhile, Tidrow silenced the
Royals through the middle four
innings, holding them hitless over
that stretch. But the Yankees were
unable to solve Splittorff.
It stayed 6-2 until the eighth. Then
Cowens, leading off, lofted Kansas
City's third home run of the game
into the lower stands in left field.
The Yankees' best chance at
Splittorff turned out to be an early
one. With New York trailing 4-0 in the
second inning, Piniella, leading off,
singled to left, just over the leap of
Patek, probably the only shortstop in
baseball not tall enough to snare the
line drive.
The Yankees' best chance at
Splittorff turned out to be an early
one. With New York trailing 4-0 in the
second inning, Piniella, leading off,
singled to left, just over the leap of
Patek, probably the only shortstop in
KC royal

al whipin
baseball not tall enough to snare the the Philadelphia Phillies Wednesday
line drive.. night, squaring the National Lcle
After Chris Chambliss forced Pin- championship series atone game
iella, Cliff Johnson singled to left. apiece.r"
Randolph forced Johnson, sending raegy backfired for the Philli it
B s to hthe fourth inning when starting pitcher
Bucky Dent hit another line drive to Jim Lonborg intentionally walked
shortstop, but Patek was tall enough Steve Garvey to fill the bases with ohe
to grab this one and end the threat, out, hoping for a double play with B'akekr
at.bat. ,

When Splittorff walked Chambliss
leading off.the ninth inning, Kansas
City Manager Whitey Herzog lifted
the left-hander and brought in Doug
Bird, who finished off the Yankees.
The Royals barely missed ending
the game with a triple play. Johnson
singled, giving New York runners at
first and second against Bird. Ran-
dolph then hit a smash to third
baseman George Brett, who stepped
on the bag and relayed to White at
second for the double play. Randolph
barely beat the relay to first,
preventing the triple play.
Splittorff was 2-0 against the
Yankees during the regular season
and 11-3 lifetime against New York
before the game. He also was the
Royals' winning pitcher against the
Yankees in the second game of last
year's playoffs.
Phillies-p hall
LOS ANGELES - Dusty Baker's
grand slam homer powered the Los
Angeles Dodgers to a 7-1 victory over
Even up

But Baker, who in the final garde^,of
the regular season became the fourth
Dodgers player to hit 30 home runs this
year, blasted a 1-2 breaking ball oves
the fence near the 370-foot sign. It4 s
the second grand slammer for the
Dodgers in the first two games of(41te
best-of-five series.
Ron Cey had hit the first grand slam
in the nine-year history of the National
League championship series Tuesday
night, but his blast couldn't prevent the
Phillies from winning 7-5.
Baker's homer broke a 1-1 tie and
paved the way for right-hander Doi
Sutton to coast to the victory.

PHILADELPHIA

McBde cf
Bowa ss
Schmdt 3b
Luziski rf
Hebner lb
Jhstne rf
Boone c
Sizmre 2b
Lonbrg p
Hutton ph
Reed p
Brown ph
Brusstar p
Total

ab r hbi
4 o1 2 1
4 0 1 0
b 0 0 0
4010
4020
4010
4010
4010
1000
i 1 0 0
0000
1000
p 0000
35 19 1

. LOS ANGELES
1 ab rh hi
lLopes2b 4r0 11
Russell ss 4 2 2 0
Smith rf 4 1 2 1
Cey 3b 3 1 1 0
Garvey lb 3 1 0 0
BakerlIf 4 1 1 4
Monday cf 3 1 1 0
Burkecf 0 0 0 0
Yeager c 3 0 1 1
Suttonp 3 0 0 0
Total 31 7907

BAKE McBRIDE ROUNDS third on his way home with a third inning homer that sent the Philadelphia Phillies ahead of Los
Angeles in last night's playoff game. The lead was short-lived however, as the Dodgers rebounded to even the series at one
ame apiece. The series continues in Philadelphia Friday night. Tonight the Yankees try to even their series against Kansas
City with Ron Guidry pitching for New York versus Larry Gura of the Royals.
Santos and Cosmos tie

Phiadephia.. ................ 001 000 0o4-i
Los Angeles. ...............001 401 lOx-7
2B - Luzinski, Monday. HR - McBride 1, Baker 1.
SB -Cey.S- -Cey.

'P
Lonborg L,o.1) .........4
Reed ......... ..4
Brussta .........2
Sutton (W,1-O)...... . 9

a. 4
JAZZ-BLU S"ROcGK & ROLL *
RHYTHM & BLUES"REGGAE"SALSA, e
GOSPEL.COMMUNITY AFFAIRS i
- ?E~ etiot

H
5
2
2
9

Rf
5
1
1

ER
5
1
i
1..

BB
1
1
0
0

SO
1
2
2
4:

L-

For Used, Rare, and Out-of Print Books

By BILLY NEFF
and
ERIC OLSEN
Special to The Dally
PONTIAC-The New York Cosmos and the Santos soc-
cer club of Brazil proved last night that the Detroit Lions
do not have exclusive rights to kicking the ball around on
the artificial turf at the Silverdome.
Pele's latest team, the Cosmos, champions of the North
American Soccer League, and his original team with
which he won three World Cups (1958, 62, 70), Santos,
played to a 1-1 tie in their own brand of "futbol." The
game was played before 24,689 partisan Cosmos fans,
the largest crowd ever to see a soccer match in
Michigan.
UNFORTUNATELY, the Silverdome fans did not
have the treat of seeing the dazzling Pele, who played his
final game last Saturday, against the same Santos con-
tingent.
Steve Hunt, the Cosmos playmaker and most valuable
player in their championship game against Seattle, did
not make the trip either.
Santos controlled action throughout the entire first
half, but came away on the short end of a 1-0 score. The
Brazilians tested Erol Yasin, New York's substitute
goalie, continuously but they could not hit their mark.
TWICE IN THE second half, Santos right winger
Nilton rattled shots off the Cosmos goalpost. With 26

minutes elapsed in the initial half, the New Yorkers
gained the momentum and the lead when their scoring
star Giorgio Chinaglia converted a -pinpoint pass from
Jadranko Topic.
The second half was no different from the first, as San-
tos dominated from the outset. This time their perser-
verence paid off when Reynaldo blasted a booming drive
past the startled Cosmos goalie, "Mr. Skol Tobacco"
Shep Messing.
At the finish of the contest, an overtime should have
been played, but due to the players weariness, they can-
celled the extra session and the game's trophy was
awarded charitably by the Santos club to the Cosmos.
COSMOS STAR Franz Beckenbauer, recognized as the
premier player in the world, believes American soccer
to be "much more difficult due to both the different
styles and different nationalities playing on an astroturf
field."
Beckenbauer looks enthusiastically to next season but
also looks back pleasureably on this campaign playing
with Pele: "He is a great player and a great person. It
was a good time that I'll never forget."
Neither will we, Franz.
Cosmos goalie Messing, former Harvard goalkeeper.
sees Detroit as possibly having a professional soccer
team.
"They have a beautiful stadium, and I was impressed
with the makeupof the crowd-kids, families."

KANSAS CITY
a
Patek ss
McRae dh
Brett 3b
Cowens rf
Otis c#
Maybry Ib
zdeb if
Porter c
FWhite 2b
Total

ib r I
412
511
500
423
440
311
400
211
411
3578

NEW YORK
hi
2 Riverscof
2 Nettles 3b
o Munsonc
1 Jacksonrif
S0 Piniella if
2 Chmbls lb
0 4Johnsn dh
0 Rndiph2b
0 Dent ss
Rwhite ph
7 Total 1

abr h bi
41.30
4000'
4112
4000
4010
4020
4010
3000
1000
35292

'_ 7

WEST SIDE
BOOK SHOP
- 113 W. LIBERTY (Downtown)
995-1891
UBRARIES ndividual Books Bought
Also Thousands of Quality
USED PAPERBACKS
1/% COVER PRICE
In Our Back Room

4 .
4.
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I,.

-Kansas city................... 22 000 01-.7
New York ............ ...002 000 o0-2
DP - Kansas City 1. LOB - Kansas City 5, New
York 7.2B - Patek, Randolph, Rivers. HR -McRae
1, Mayberry 1, Munson 1, Cowens 1. SB - Zdeb.

Fiction-Poetry-Philosophy-Drama
Psych-Music-Art-And More

-I

7

-==

Phlip Morris Incorporated

/

i

Spartan
cager
EAST LANSING (AP) - Nate Phil-
lips, a senior basketball player for
Michigan State, has been ruled ineligi-
ble for at least part of the 1977-78 season
for playing in an apparently illegal
summer tournament at Omaha, Neb.

Work in Washington, D.C.
This Summer
sponsored by Washington Summer Intern Program '
POSITIONS IN Congressional Offices, Executive Agencies,
Lobbying Organizations, News Media, Research Organizations,
and Museums.
(UNDERGRADUATES ONLY)
MASS MEETING
WEDNESDAY-7:30-OCT. 12
MLB Auditorium 3
"in J.i JL. . i. ..A.......A.. .... ...A A A Ai.. As_

Announces Its
M arketing/Communications Cmptiio
The Competition: Philip Morris Incorporated is sponsoring its
Ninth Annual Marketing/Communications Competition, offering win-
ners cash awards for the development of a marketing/communications
proposal related to the company's non-tobacco products.or operations.
It is designed to provide students with realistic and practical business
experience to supplement their classroon learning.
The Topic: Students may propose a program in corporate respon-
sibility, marketing, promotion, advertising, college relations, communi-
cations, community relations, urban affairs, government affairs, etc.
The Judges: Members of the selection committee are: Eugene H.
Kummel, Chairman, McCann Erickson; Mary Wells Lawrence, Chair-
man, Wells, Rich, Greene; Arjay Miller, Dean, Stanford Business School;
William Ruder, President, Ruder & Finn; and James C. Bowling, Senior
Vice President, Philip Morris Incorporated.
The Students: The Competition is open to students currently en-
rolled in any accredited college or university. Undergraduate students

R.4N
a. "
4. 4
4.
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The No. 1 Rock-n-Roll Disco
SUDS FA~CTORY
737 N. Huron
(at Lowell, dust east of the E.M.U. Campus)
TON IGHTI

K

must work in groups of five or more, and graduate students in groups of
two or more, both under the counsel of a full-time faculty member.
The Prize: A first place award of $1,000 and a second place award
of $500 will be presented to the winning entries in the undergraduate and
graduate categories.

i

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