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October 06, 1977 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-10-06

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iursday, October 6, 1977-The Michigan Daily

USE-SENATE CONFERENCE WILL BE (
!arter's 'War ou

VASHINGTON (AP) - The am-
pition President Carter proposed
ise for an energy battle he called
e moral equivalent of war" has
n seriously blunted by Congress
ce the program was issued on
il 20.
(hile the House passed most of the
sident's energy program last
gust in one package, the Senate
nediately fragmented it into five
ts and then began dismantling th'e
ces.
Aministration officials and con-
ssional Democratic leaders ex-
ss hope that most of the Presi-
it's proposals can be cemented
k together again and enacted by
er this year.
UT RECENT Senate actions,
king at the heart of the Presi-
it's plan, suggest this might be a
rculean chore.
he chipping away at the Presi-
it's program didn't begin with the

Senate. The House dumped the
President's plan for higher gasoline
taxes and for rebates for small car
buyers before senators even got the
legislation.
Here is a rundown on each of the
President's major energy proposals
and how they have fared in both
chambers.
" NATURAL GAS PRICING: Car-
ter proposed ending the dual market
under which gas in interstate pipe-
lines is regulated at $1.46 per
thousand cubic feet while gas used in
the states where it is produced is free
from controls. He recommended a
uniform new ceiling on all newly
discovered gas starting at $1.75 per
1,000 cubic feet and rising to about
$3.36 by 1985.
completely. But the Senate earlier
this week took the opposite approach,
approving an industry-backed plan to
lift price, controls on new gas after
two years and to leave the intra-
state markets free from regulation.

"RITICAL:
Energ
A House-Senate conference com-
mittee will try to reconcile the
differences and put together a com-
promise bill. Carter has said he will
veto the legislation ifs it contains
deregulation like that voted by the
Senate.
* CRUDE OIL TAX: The Presi-
dent proposed cutting fuel consump-
tion by imposing a tax on domestic
petroleum that would make it as
expensive to refiners by 1981 as
imported oil. The result would be an
increase of about seven cents a
gallon for gasoline and other petro-
leum products. He proposed return-
ing the tax to consumers as rebates.
Again, the House agreed to the
President's plan pretty much as
submitted. But the Senate Finance
Committeerejected it outright. Even
members supporting the tax general-
ly held that the revenues should be
used for developing new sources of
energy, not for rebates.
The White House has indicated it
might slap a $5-a-barrel fee on oil
.imports - which would have approx-
imately the same cost impact on

consumers - if Congress rejects the
crude oil tax.
" COAL CONVERSION: The
House approved the President's pro-
posal to force most utilities and
industries to burn coal instead of
scarce natural gas and oil.
The Senate approved a watered-
down version, clamping down on
industrial and utility use of natural
gas shipped across state lines but
allowing all but the largest plants to
continue burning oil.
The President's plan, passed by
the House, also would impose a tax
on utilities and factories that use oil
and gas after a certain date with tax
incentives to those which shift to
coal. This part of the program is in
serious trouble in the Senate Finance
Committee.
" GAS INEFFICIENCY TAX: The
President proposed taxes on cars
that get poor gas mileage starting in
1978 with a corresponding rebate to
buyers of fuel efficient cars.
The House Ways and Means Com-
mittee killed the rebate scheme. The

'mired in the trenches

rest of the plan was substantially
modified in the House-passed bill,
with the tax not beginning until 1979
and applying to fewer cars.
The Senate rejected the tax con-
cept and passed instead an outright
ban on the production of cars that get
less than 16 miles per gallon after
1980, rising to 21 miles per gallon by
1985.
" STANDBY GASOLINE T A X:
Carter wanted the power to impose
an added nickel-a-year tax on gaso-
line for each year consumption rose
above specified targets.
It was quickly rejected by the
House Ways and Means Committee
and several half-hearted efforts to
revive it in the House failed. It has
not been considered by the Senate.
" ELECTRIC UTILITY RATES:
The President called for a complete
overhaul of electric rate structures,
making power cheaper to consumers
who use it during off-peak hours and
seasons and ending discounts to
industries who use large amounts of
electricity.

The House approved the Presi-
dent's plan and made it even strong-
er, giving the government greater
power to intervene in state electric
rate-making cases.
But the Senate. discarded every-
thing having to do with rates. Its bill
would just give the government the
power to make energy-saving sug-
gestions to utilities and, under some
circumstances, to order connecting
lines between power plants.
" CONSERVATION Credits: The
President called for tax credits for
home insulation, solar energy and
other energy-conservation steps.
The House modified the formula
somewhat, but stuck by the original
concept, voting to give homeowners
up to $400 in tax credits for home
insulation and even larger tax breaks
for solar energy and wind-power
devices.
The Senate Finance Committee is
expected to follow suit. This part of
the President's plan is the least
controversial and the most likely to
pass virtually unscathed.

POETRY READING
Thursday, Oct. 6th-at 7:30

withWilliam "Genghis" Kincaida
Reading from his work
at GUIL D HOUSE
802 MONROE at the corner of Oakland
A communications group of native people of the Americas Grupo De
Communication Social De Los Pueblo Indigenas.
This group representing Native People of Canada, the U.S., Mexico
and Guatemala will be at the University of Michigan Tuesday,
October i.
WORKSHOPS AND CLASSROOM VISITS: discussing Native Issues during
the day by:
PHILLIP DEERE, Muskoge, spiritual advisor to AIM and delegate to UN
Treaty conference at Geneva.
ADRIAN CHAVEZ, Quiche (Mayan), elder and man of knowledge.
COYOTE, Wylaki, participant in Stockholm Conf. on the Environment,
speaks on spiritual values relating to ecology.
RARIHOKWATS. founder of Akwesasne Notes, speaking on current issues.
FILM FESTIVAL: all day in the Multipurpose Room, Underqrad Library.
GUATEMALAN TEXTILES, CRAFTS DISPLAY AND MARIMBA: Fishbowl all day.
FOUR ARROWS POTLUCK AND SOCIAL DOINGS: 5-7 p.m. South Quad
Dining Room.' Bring some food and socialize--open to anyone in,
terested.
LAS DANZAS DE CONQUISTA: A group of Nahuatl dancers from Teno-
chitlan. Presenations combine ancient instruments with dance as
spiritual event. This wilIbe in the Union Ballroom at 8-Op.m.
TUESDAY. OCTOBER 11, 1977 FOR INFORMATION 769-7442

UAW votes not to

DETROIT (AP-Top officials of the
United Auto Workers voted last night
against reaffiliation with the AFL-CIO
at this time, citing majority opposition
from rank-and-file union members who
prefer the UAW independent.
The action came despite strong sup-
port for reaffiliation from union
president Douglas A. Fraser and other
top officials.
THE UAW's 25-member Inter-
national Executive Board met most of
the afternoon and into the evening to
consider whether to call a special fall
convention on the question.
While 20 members said they favored
rejoining the organization that has
come to embody organized labor, a
RACKHAM
GRADUATE
STUDENTS
If you intend to graduate this term with either a
master's degre. or an intermediate degree
awarded by the fackhom Graduate School, you
must submit a Diploma Application to the Records
Office, Room 101 Rackham Graduate School, no
later than Friday, October 7. 1977 in order to be
'placed on the Oscember degree list.
Diploma applicatior s are availabte in the Rack-
ham Graduate School. Room 1014, as well as in
your department of program office.

region-by-region review of the UAW
membership determine that the sup-
port simply was not there, Fraser told a
news conference.
Fraser, just elected to the union's top
position this past May, said he was
"disappointed" by the decision and
does not expect reaffiliation to be
reconsidered "in the foreseeable
future."
FRASER SAID the majority of mem-
bers want to stay out of the AFL-CIO
because they fear the UAW would lose
its identity.
"The other argument for not reaf-
filiating is that we've done so well since
1968 outside the AFL-CIO, why should
go back in," he said.
The two unions split because of strong
philosophical differences between AFL-
CIO President George Meany and his
more liberal UAW counterpart, the late

0 %0

rjotn
Walter P. Reuther. Many labor obser-
vers had expected reconciliation
because of Meany's age and the
possibility he may soon retire.
Though Fraser and others wanted to
buy the hatchet with the AFL-CIO, two
union leaders in par-
ticularly-secretary-treasurer Emil
Mazey and vice president Irving
Bluestone-vehemently opposed the
move.
Fraser had pushed for reaffiliation
primarily to give labor a more united
front as a lobbyist in Washington. The
UAW gained considerable political
clout in the 1976 presidential campaign
with its early endorsement of Jimmy
Carter, but still takes a back seat to
Meany and his cohorts on Capitol Hill.
Of the 17 UAW regions in the United
States, Fraser said, nine favored reaf-
filiation and eight opposed it. But the
eight opposing regions had a greater

r
i

tFL-CIO
number of convention delegate votes,
he said.
After conceding the lack of sufficient
rank-and-file support, the executive
board voted unanimously against
holding the special convention.
The union leadership ducked the
issue at its regular convention in May to
allow for a smooth transition of power
following the retirement of Leonard
Woodcock as president.

- r
....................................................
! -ONLY THREEDAYS LEFTI-
* 0
S$1O ALL BALFOUR
PROFESSIONAL AND TRADITIONAL SERIES RINGS
(Men's and Ladies')
* /
"
!! BUSINESS P)11
EDUCATION MUSIC
!
f PHARMACY kLAW
* -
" I&~ ENGINEERING
0 LIBERAL ARTS FORESTRY
" ALSO DENTAL
- . MEDICAL
r ; ; VETERINARIAN !-
MEDICINEV
and
NATURAL SCIENCE
* AGRICULTURE ARCHITECTURE
! BALFOUR RING DAYS
"0
Dates: Oct. 5-8th !
WEDNESDAY THRU SATURDAY "
0 "
Introducingthe new Shank series in both round and square top rings."
* FULL NAME ENGRAVING FREE DURING RING DAYSIi
i *

Humphrey
rFord, Dole
linked to
Koreagate
WASHINGTON (AP) - South Ko-
rean rice dealer Tongsun Park
reportedly told' the Korean Central
Intelligence Agency that he gave
large sums of cash to. prominent
congressmen, Cox Newspapers re-
ported.
However, Justice Department offi-
cials who have seen the report say
they suspect Park falsified at least
some of the names and inflated his
spending figures, the story said.
The news service quoted unidenti-
fied sources as saying Park claimed
in a report to the KCIA to have
contributed thousands of dollars to
then House Republican Leader Ger-
ald R. Ford and Sens. Hubert H.
Humphrey (D-Minn.), and Robert
Dole (R-Kan.).
THE STORY, prepared for publi-
cation in today's newspapers, said
Park's report to the KCIA in 1971 or
1972 named about 40 congressmen.
The three politicians were not in-
cluded among the congressmen list-
ed in an indictment against Park as
having received cash contributions
from him.

Meany Fraser
4:
*U-.M Clericals need a Union *.
4: Organizing Committee
4: for Clericals*
Presents
SALT OF THE EARTH
A Film Benefit
THURSDAY, OCT. 6-8 p.m.-Donation$l
4: WESLEY FOUNDATION-Corner of State & Huron
support the organizing drive!
,"" "" """ "*

I

~it

K

Michigan
House
defeats
pot bill
(continued from Page #)
ounce or less of marijuana from a
maximum $1,000 fine and year in jail to
a maximum $100 fine with no jail term.
IT ALSO would reduce the penalty for'
sale of an ounce or less from a
maximum $2,000 fine and up to four
years in prison to a maximum $1,000
fine and a year in jail.
In asking the House to reconsider the
marijuana issue, Bullard cited
President Carter's support for lesser
pot penalties as well as the State Bar's
support of his bill.
Opponents of the bill said liberalizing
pot laws would constitute a legislative
endorsement of drug use.

t~
when wompniedwith

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