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October 04, 1977 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-10-04

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Page 10-Tuesday, October 4, 1977-The Michigan Daily

Swim.III
Just #*r the
health o it.
Get movingAmerica!
March 1-7, 1977 is
Nanal Physical Education and Sport Week
Physical Education Public information
American Alliance for Health.
1Physcal Education and Recreation
1201 16th St. N W Washington, 0 C .20036

COW WOWS
VIENNA, Ohio' (AP)--A 12-year-old
Holstein cow named Breezewood Patsy
Bar Pontiac has again ambled off with
the world champion butterfat title.
Her owners, Herman and Henry
Gelbke, who farm near here, reported
Patsy produced 47,500 pounds of milk
and 2,230 pounds of butterfat in 365
days--about five times the production
of an average cow.
Patsy's mom held two national but-
terfat records and her grandma held
the national title for 13 years.

Court rules Nixon

City grants U' liquor

ALL LADIES Admitted Free
TONIGHT At

raw
CEr

tapes ma
WASHINGTON (UPI) - The Su-
preme Court refused yesterday to
overturn an order that Richard
Nixon's White House tapes be
screened for evidence in a civil
damage suit filed on behalf of 1,200
illegally arrested "May Day" dem-
onstrators.
The justices rejected Nixon's argu-
ment that presidential privilege bars
the tapes from being used in civil
suits.
THEY LET stand an appeals court
ruling that tapes from April 16 to
May 16, 1971, be screened for
evidence in a suit against former
Attorney General John Mitchell. It
charges Mitchell took part in a
top-level conspiracy to violate the
rights of antiwar demonstrators here
by illegal mass arrests in 1971.
After the tapes are reviewed, most
likely by a government archivist,
District Judge William Bryant may
examine transcripts of relevant con-
versations in his chambers and
Nixon's lawyers may once again
object to their admission.
LAWYERS WHO sued on behalf of
"May Day" demonstrators said it is
"highly likely" the tapes include
discussions between Nixon a n d
Mitchell about the week-long protests
in which more than 7,000 persons
were picked up by police.
Justice Department papers con-
firm Mitchell, now in jail for his role

be used
in the Watergate coverup, attended
three of a series of meetings at which
top-level administration figures pre-
pared for the protests.
Other participants included Nixon
aide John Ehrlichman and Assistant
Attorneys General Robert Mardian
and William Rehnquist. Rehnquist,
now a justice, did riot participate in'
consideration of this case.
BRYANT ORIGINALLY ordered
relevant tapes produced for the
protesters' lawyers, but the U.S.
Court of Appeals, in a 2-1 ruling,
modified his order to afford Nixon
more protection.
,The appeals court, noting neither
Presidents Ford nor Carter had
supported Nixon's claim, said he had
no absolute privilege to keep such
materials confidential when sought
in a civil action.
It said there may be just as strong
a constitutional need for disclosure of
tapes in this kind of civil action -
which "is tantamount to a charge of
civil conspiracy among high officers
of government to deny a class of
citizens their constitutional rights"

li ense for,
By JULIE ROVNER
After a heated debate about the
University's responsibility to the
city, the Ann Arbor City- Council
approved an application for a liquor
license and a dance and entertain-
ment permit for the Michigan
League last night by a 7-3 margin.
The application now goes back to
the state liquor commission for final
approval.
THE CONTROVERSY arose be-
cause the University had failed to
send the Council a letter explaining
what they wanted the permit for.
"If they don't tell us what they're
going to do, then how can we approve
of it?" said Councilman Ken Latta
(D-1st Ward).
Part of the problem is that the
Council had already approved a class
C license last month for the League.
However, the decision to ask for a
dance and entertainment permit
necessitated the revoking of that
application and a whole new applica-
tion to be submitted.
ALL OF THE opposition centered

League
on the failure of the University to
submit the letter of intent with the
new application.
"If they don't respect the dignity of
our processes, then I see no reason to
grant them the permit," said Coun-
cilman Roger Bertoia (R-3rd Ward).
"The University doesn't treat this
government with one iota of respect,
and that's the issue," said Mayor
Albert Wheeler, who cast the third
'no' vote.
-ALSO LAST night, Council unani-
mously passed an ordinance that
would amend part of Title IX of the
city code to prevent housing discrim-
ination on the basis of children in a
household.
The city human rights amendment,
which the new ordinance amends, is
being totally rewritten.
But Leslie Morris, who sponsored
the ordinance, felt it important to get
the wording in now to avoid conflict.
A draft of the new human rights
amendment is expected to be pre-
sented to the Council at the last
meeting of this month.

Appearing Thru Sunday:

w

BaND

Nail-biting test-takers learn to

relax through prof's
By HILARY LEFF proves attention and makes one notice
detail. The ideal level of anxiety to

ONE WEEK ONLY!
0!
$00O.. ALL BALFOUR
FS
PROFESSIONAL ANDTRADITIONAL SERIES RINGS
*!
r ,
" -- PHRMAC lie - LA1* ,
Ir "
LBERL ATS ORETR "U"NS
e # 'i MEICAL ENTA
EECIC UNEC
n ii j
* -
E BUSINESSG D Y
"" MONEDAY ARTU FATERTAY e
~~\P
\BEDUCATION A/ DENTAUUS
0 PrstgeLne-Blfu - s LAW
-,VETERHAARAAN
120 S. Uiverity 63-790\
* *
* LIBERALUARTS FORENTR
" t
Filets ihgnr o ksngtho nwr hksres nbt dadsu rt prng.
:A-Y YMEDICALLALSO DENTALER
AGCLTE aArt & E ng ARCHITECTURE"
S 322 S. State St.-662-6594 662-4403 !
"! Ulrich's . Books & Supplies
S 549 E. University 663-320 Ot
#ntroduin"thenlewShank!seriesibothroundandsqareotoprigs.

Testitis - an acute case of anxiety
brought on by testing situations. Symp-
toms include stomach upset, head-
aches, loss of appetite, and in severe
vases, ulcers.
Test anxiety, long a familiar part of
the academic experience to some de-
gree, has become more than a passing
affliction for some students As compe-
titior for Admission to law and medical
schools and other graduate schools has
intensified, increasing numbers of stu-
dents have been reporting pronounced
and chronic cases.
IN RESPONSE to the growing prob-
lem here, James Papsdorf, a professor
in the Psychology Department, has de-
veloped the Test Anxiety Program -
designed to help students alleviate
some of the anxiety produced in testing
sit'uations.
Now in its third year, the program
gives students techniques to enable
them to control their anxiety levels to
such a degree that anxiety becomes a
positive rather than negative force.
"A certain level of anxiety," main-
tains Papsdorf, "is a good thing. It im-.

achieve during testing is a duplicate of
the level achieved during studying."
THE PROCESS for achieving this is
twofold.
The first step is called cognitive cop-
ing. This involves labeling the stress in
a less stressful way. Instead of saying
that you are an idiot and grand scale ig-
noramus when you are unable to an-
swer a test question, you say instead:
'it is a pain in the ass and it's dis-
appointing, but that's all it is.' You at-
tempt to scale down your stress and
bring it into proportion with the situa-
tion.
The second step involves biofeedback
and is geared towards coping with
physical ailments caused by stress.
Students learn how to force their bodies
to be more relaxed.'
X IS A 29-year-old medical student
who participated in the program last
winter. "Prior to the program I got
chronic headaches, hypertension, loss
of appetite and that sort of thing. My
blood pressure was 150 over 110. There
was just a lot of tension. The problems

program
would develop way before the test. The
test was only the climax of the negative
pathology."
Unlike most forms of psychology, this
method offers almost immediate re-
sults. Says X: "There was a progres-
sive change; by the second and third
weeks I noticed a difference. I noticed
that I had been walking around "very
tense all the time. After these sessions I
realized I had relaxed nearly every
muscle in my body.
'Papsdorf estimates that between 10
and 40 per cent of the student popu-
lation could benefit from the Test
Anxiety Program
AS WOULD BE expected, students in
pre-professional programs or profes-
sional graduate programs -' med or
law school - tend to have a higher anxi-
ety level than the general student body.
The program is part of an ongoing re-
search project at the-University and the
results obtained from the program are
used to further research on anxiety.
Although there are no formal follow-
up studies, students contacted claim
that the program has "changed their
lives." The techniques learned are ap-
plicable to a variety of everyday situa-
tions, public speaking and socializing.
Also,there seems to be no regression.
As med student X says, "My blood
pressure is now 118 over 70. It's never
been this low in my entire life."
Students interested in the program
can call 764-6311.

are you sure
you know
what family
planning
is all
about?

If you think family planning means
taking measures to prevent
unwanted pregnancies ... you're
only partially right. Family
planning does help you have
children when you want them...
can afford them the best.and
can love them the most.
But did you know it also means:
. improving the health of mother and baby
""counseling men on their role and respon-
sibility in family planning.
- helping couples who want to have children
but can't.
" counseling young people about how having
a baby can affect their health and their lives.
Be sure you know ALL about family planning
it means more than you may have thought.
All these services are available from the family planning
clinic in your community, your local health department
or your own physician.

The
Peace
Corps is
alive and
well and
waiting
for you.
All your life you've
wanted to do something im-
portant for the world. Now aj
lot of the world needs you to
do it. We need volunteers with
skills and all kinds of practical
knowledge. Call toll free:
800-424-8580.
Ths Newspaper~ulcSriec
JKIThe Advertising Council

i 7

V'S.lDIPARl IN ICM,111 ,L1I II
IH~i WA I ION.AN I)WI HAKEI

I IGMS I

GOT..,,
FWW I~i
YEH OWi

HE REALLY'
u KEs His jog .
SYOU KNOW R4E
WENT V\Nl14TH
H ARR~IS ,EMI-
PALM CRAY, FLOI pA.
VOI 6

DESIGN EN6INEER.
RI6i4T NOW, REtS

1 'VE RE AD P R1
SEMI CONpUCMR"
SA LEANER IN
APPLICATIONS O
ADVANCED 1EQ4-
NOLOGY RALLY.
THEY INVENTEED P"SM.
NOW THEY VEi60rT
CMOS PROMS AND
5UPR PER M I NC
RAM. tlEV'i2E
EVE~N LEA IN
C MREIN

KNOW AW1VT1 NG
ASOUT- OPMRTUN PTIE'S
FOR OUR GRAPUATUt*
CLA5?
rEYE LKiN-> FoR
GRAPUALS WrH A g. IN
ELECtRICAL ENGINEERING

AND AN M . 1N
ELECTRICAL ENG~INEERING

. 4

Pr=Y, JON, WPIERE&i
yOU GOlNG?
To SIGN UP.
HARRIS SEMI-
COWpucTR/
WERE I COME.'.'
0(

HEY, THE HARRIS SEMI-
CON LUCTOF- RECRUITSrR
WILL BE ON CAMPUS
OCT. 17 1977

I

w ar a L o$ i s i

IVE ALREADY 516""P UP
'/O'R~I 4TREST ~1, YoU b
ell SGN U TO 4

I

I l

l

I T

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