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September 08, 1977 - Image 29

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-08

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Thursday, September 8, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Thursday, September 8, 1977 THE MICHIGAN bAILY Page Nine

.

Harriers,

thinc/ads

run

all

year

Warhurst aims for
fourth straight titl

By ERNIE DUNBAR
For Michigan cross country
coach Ron Warhurst, winning
comes fairly easy.
Since coming to Ann Arbor in
1974, Warhurst has guided his
squads to three consecutive Big
Ten championships.
And what has the fourth
year coach grinning from ear
to ear is- that his 1977 team,
with 11 returning lettermen,,
should be his best ever.
"It should be the best team
I've had in my four years here,"
said Warhurst. "We've got more
depth than we've ever had be-
fore."
Although the Wolverines lost
last season's number one man,
Greg Meyer, to graduation, the
three-time cross country All-
American won't be as sorely
missed as most would think:
Warhurst has the fortune of
regaining the services of Mike
McGuire, an All-American as
a freshman, who was forced
to sit out his junior season
from a bout with mononucle-
osis. The former Farmington
High School standout will be a

key member in the Wolver-
ines' success.
"I think if Mike comes back
healthy there isn't anybody in
the Big Ten who can beat him,"
Warhurst said with a tone pf
confidence. "He's a better cross
country runner than Meyer (who
finished third in last year's Big
Ten meet) at this stage in their'
careers." '
Also missing .from last, year's
championship team were Jack
Sinclair, also out with mono, and
Jay Anstaett who missed the
season with a stress fracture.
Sinclair finished 10th in the Big
Ten meet as a freshman, while
Anstaett was finishing 18th in
his sophomore campaign.
Add that trio to the champ-
ionship base 'varburst estab-
lished in 19 '1. and the Wolver-
ine mentor is very optimistic.
"You take our top seven from
last year and we're only losing
Meyer, so you've got a pretty
strong set of six people," com-
mented Warhurst. "Then if you
intersperse McGuire, Anstaett,
and Sinclair in there, it's not go-
ing to be like their eighth, ninth,
or 10th man. Mike is going to be
one or two, Sinclair three or

four, and Anstaett a strong have two years of eligibility left,
fifth." while Sinclair has three.
When Warhurst speaks of Completing the Wolverines'
depth, he's not joking one bit. block of talent will be seniors
"We'llh ave 14 or 15 guys Mark Foster and Bob Scheper,
who'll be trying to make the juniors Bruce McFee and Doug
top seven,"ysaid Warhurst, Sweazey, sophomores Dan Heik-
"which is going to make some kinen and Dave Lewis, and
incredible experiences for both transfer student Chip Hadler.
the kids on the team and my- Warhurst has Michigan's
self in the fall." Class A State individual cross
In cross country, a team of country champion and two-
seven runners competes over a mile champion Gary Carter of
five or six mile course, with on- St. Clair Shores Lakeview to
ly the team's top five runners pace the incoming freshman
counting towards the team's to- class.
tal. "I kind of think he might be
A team wins a meet by scor- the sleeper of the group," War-
ing the lowest number of points. hurst remarked of Carter.
Points are awarded on the basis Warhurst's pre-season goals of
of the runner's finish in the race, going undefeated until the na-
with the winner receiving obe tional championships in Novem-
point, while the 25th finisher ber' could seem like an awfully
would score 25 points for his tall statement to make.
team. But since he has won the Big
Michigan's team depth comes Ten championship every year
in handy in big races, since if he's coached at Michigan, plus
the Wolverines' sixth or seventh winning the Central Collegiate
men are able to place ahead of Conference title since the team
the opposing teat's fifth man, entered the conference in 1975,
it boots the point total of the his statements tend to hold some
competitor. weight
Providing the nucleus of Giving the Wolverines their
Warhurst's squad will be Mc- stiffest challenge for a fourth
Guire, two-time senior.All-Am- consecutive Big Ten title will
erican Bill Donakowski (fifth be Minnesota, Wisconsin, and
in last year's Big Ten meet), Indiana.
Junior Steve Elliott (sixth in But Warhurst is ready for the
the Big Ten), plusSinclair and challenge.
Anstaett. "We're looking very positively
Due to their illnesses from last towards four straight Big Ten
season, McGuire and Anstaett titles,' he said with a big smile.

By DAVE RENBARGER
1976 was a banner year for
Michigan track.
1977 was not.
1978 doesn't even get started
until the middle of January for
the thinclads, but their coach,
Jack Harvey, is already think-
ing in terms of a possible re-
peat performance of his team's
accomplishments in '76.
That year, Harvey directed
the tracksters to two Big
Ten track championships ---
winning both the winter in-
door campaign and the spring
outdoor circuit.,
And, with minimal gradua-
tion losses, a lot of people had
the Wolverines pegged for a
couple more conference titles
this past year;.'
But things didn't quite work
out that way.
Indoors, Michigan had the ad-
vantage of running the Big Ten
meet on its owndtrack, but still
ended _up second fiddle to Illi-
nois, losing bya mere one point
mnargin.
The outdoor crown also
wvent to the Fighting Illini,
with the Blue thinclads drop-
ping to a slightly embarrass-
ing fifth place.
"We felt that we should have
won that indoor meet," said

Harvey's trackmlen
hope for rebound

Harvey. "We came so close, it!
was a real heartbreaker."
"Outdoors we just couldn't
get anything going. Nobody rani
up to their potential. It was a
pretty dismal meet."a
Looking toward the coming
season, Harvey cites a bit of
past history in explanation of
his optimism.
"These things kind of run
in cycles," he said. "Good
years then off years. We had
a lot of pressure on us after
sweeping in '76 and we nev-
er came close to living up to
some pre-season expectations.
Now I just hope we can get
it back together and win
again."
With a solid batch of re-
turnees, plus a promising con-
tingent . of recruits, Harvey
seems to have the personnel
necessary to win again.

Leading the veterans out onto "Those guys are all tough-
the track this winter will be competitors," said Harvey.
senior quarter-miler James "The problem was that I think
Grace.- they got too used to winning.
The Detroit native is coming This year we destroyed the
off a sensational year, winning myth that they are unbeatable.
the conference quarter-mile title Nobody likes to lose and I think
indoors and tying for the 400 they are ready to start winning
meters championship outdoors again."
in a photo-finish dead heat. The thinclads suffered only a.
Joining Grace again this mild graduation. again this year.
Jearwill be Jim Stokes, the losing but four competitors and
yeaord breaking Wolrine two individual Big Ten champs.
p le vaulter. Two seasons Newly recruited Wolverines
a o, the senior from Flint set include half-miler Bill Weid-
the varsity mark with a vault enbach from ° Grosse Pointe
of 16-6. Last year, he twice North, two-miler Gary Carter
cleared 17-1/4. from St. Clair Shores Lake-
Senior distance men Billy view, and quarter-miler Ken
Donakowski and Mike McGuire, Gartner fromt Detroit Cass
junior sprinter/hurdler Charles Tech.
Crouther, and sophomore half- , From the junior college ranks
miling twins Tim and Greg To- comes sophomore Mike Lattany,
mas also return, providing Har- a seven foot high jumper who
vey with an experienced group also doubles as a horizontal
of talent. jumper.

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Veterans pace BI

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I

By DON MacLACHLAN
Many Michigan students have never
stepped foot in Ray L. Fisher Stadium,,
despite the fact that the team that plays
there has made three consecutive NCAA
appearances.
The Michigan baseball team, last year's
Big Ten runner-up with a 14-4 conference
record, has a predominately veteran team
coming back this year. Many of the start-
ers on Coach Moby Benedict's squad
played significant roles in the Wolverines'
Big Ten title runs in 1975 and 1976.
IF THE WOLVERINES HAVE a real
strong point this season it will be their
infield. Four seniors return, three of them
as three year starters for Michigan.
Third baseman Dave Chapman spear-
heads the infield. The Grosse Pointe na-
tive has a cannon-like arm and earned a
place on the all-Big Ten first team last
year. Chapman, a Big Ten all-academic
selection hit .250 last year and belted two
home runs while doing a fine defensive
job at the hot corner.
The Wolverine double play combination
of Jim Berra and Scott Anderson is one;

of the Big Ten's finest. Shortstop Berra
is one of the best defensive players in the
conference and showed his offensive
power by blasting three round trippers in
the month of April.
A JUNIOR FROM ANN ARBOR, An-
derson had to rate as the surprise of last
year. The second sacker hit well all sea-
son finishing up with a .307 mark along
with seven stolen bases. Mostly a singles
hitter, Anderson transferred from Washte-
naw Community College last year and
could be Benedict's leadoff hitter this
spring.
Bob Wasilewski, the big first baseman
from Livonia, slammed five homers last
year and Benedict is counting on him for
more of the same power this spring.
In the Michigan outfield Benedict will
have to replace departed co-captain Mark
Grenkoski in left field. However, the other
two outfield spots should be manned by a
pair of very capable returning lettermen.

ue nine"r
ond straight year, the junior from Flint
won the Wolverine batting title with a
.316 average and paced the squad in RBI's
with 35. Leach got off to a terrible start
but sizzled as the year wore on and fin-
ished eight for fourteen in the NCAA Mid-
west Regional where the Wolverines 1
bowed to Southern Illinois.

TWO FREE COPIES WI
FIRST WEEK OF C

f'
:E

Another player who warmed up as the
season progressed was senior right fielder
*Mike Parker. Parker led the team in
home runs with six and the powerful right
handed hitter finished the year on a fine
note. Along with Leach, he earned a spot
on the all-Midwest Regional first team
, and batted .303 for the year.
THE ENTIRE STARTING pitching
staff returns for the Wolverines, who fin-
ished up 33-15 on tl- season - recording
the second most wins in Blue history.
The ace of the staff, sophomore lefty
Steve Howe, posted a 9-3 mark as a frosh
along with a 1.84 ERA. Senior righthander
Bill Stennett and lefthander.Craig McGin-
nis netted six victories apiece last season
ands junior Steve Perry chipped in with
.
five.

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- ____________ --______ .-~----- _____- . -, -- ----- --

FOOTBALL QUARTERBACK
Leach and his hot stick return
down the fort in centerfield. Fort

Rick
to hold
the sec-

... .. ,r ... ....
Daiy sports staff offers
unparallelled experiences

THE

By Ffats Strops

When I joined the Daily three years ago, an older colleague
told me I would probably have only two of the following three
things during my four years in Ann Arbor: grades, social life
and a successful career on the Daily sports staff.
It's a question of priorities. And like everything else, the
people who put the most into the Daily are the ones who seem
to get the most out of it. Sports staff can be a lot of fun.
How else can you:
-fill Rickey Green in on the details of the NBA draft
as it comes over the Associated Press wire?
-go to Grand Forks, North Dakota with the hockey team?
-witness a classic Bobby Knight vs. The Press confron-
tation first hand?
-hear Bo Schembechler expound after an Ohio State
game?
-travel to Ypsilanti with the soccer club?
If you're thinking about a career in sportswriting, we'd like
to think that the practical experience and the pile of clippings
you'll get here will put you in good stead over any run of the
mill journalism major.
Not that you have to be an experienced writer. A lot of us
joined more for love of sports than for love of writing. All frus-
trated jocks to some degree, we have IM teams in football and
basketball. Our Daily Libels defeated Edit Staff in a celebrated
Mud Bowl game last fall, but lost the annual grudge match in
basketball (what Sports staff really needs is a quick guard and
a center).
When you first start out, you'll learn to clip the AP sports
wire,' proofread, write headlines and edit copl. We cover
most sports on a beat basis. Football is reserved for senior
editors, and basketball and hockey usually go to the most
capable underclassmen. Seniority counts for a lot, but stories
you'll get as a "trainee" can be fun, calling coaches long
distance for advances and scouting reorts in Big Ten foot-
ball, minor sports features., etc. We also cover the Pistons
and Tigers regularly, and those games are. generally up for
grabs.
The extent of your commitment is up to yo. Trainees sign
un for one nigrht a week, from 7:00 until around midnight. If'
you're interested, yo'll nick up on things fast and go on to night}
editing. If the going is slow at first, we usually resort to playing
APBA baseball, "wheelchair" basketball or drinking 14c Cokes.

MICHIGAN BOOK STORE

322 S. STATE ST.
Enlarged Text Floor
More Used Books Than Ever
Easy to Locate and Browse
Texts For All Courses

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with fluted bezel and matching bracelet (7019/308).

MEDICAL, DENTAL, LAW, NURSING,
SOCIAL WORK, and PUBLIC HEALTH

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