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October 01, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


-Saturday, October 1, 1977-The Michigan Daily

Church Worship Services

Weather service to move here,
but forecasts will not improve

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.-663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor I
Sunday Services at 9:15 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 am.
Midweek Worship Wednesday, 10:00
p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Services and Sunday School
S1: 30 a. m.
i ednesday Testimony Meeting-8:00
Child Care Sunday-under 2 years.
M$.idweek Informal Worship.
Leading Room-306 E. Liberty, 10-5
l1onday-Saturday; closed Sundays.
IVERSITY CHURCH OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at the Ann Arbor Y,
530 S. Fifth g
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transportation:
663-3233 or 426-3808.
10: 00 a. m,-Sunday Worship.

CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Student Foundation).
218 N. Division
665-0606
Chaplain: Rev. Andrew Foster
Sunday Eucharist at noon. -
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-l11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
State at Huron and Washington
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
The Rev. Fred B. Maitland
The Rev. E. Jack Lemon
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00.
Church School a 9:00 and 11:00.
Adult Enrichment at 10:00.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
W. Thomas Shomaker,
Chaplain/Director
Extensive programming for under-
g ads and grad students.

Get that
pefegtword off
thetipofyour
-~tongue... and put
itonpaper
iwhere it
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ANN ARBOR CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
.(one block west of U of M Stadium)
Bible Study-Sunday 9:30 a.m.;
Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.
Need transportation? Call 662-9928.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice, Ministers
10 a.m.-Morning Service.
5 p.m.-Informal Worship.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
608 E. William, corner of State
Worship Service-10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship-l0 a.m.
First Baptist Church.
Bible Study-11 a.m..
Fellowship Meeting Tuesday at 7:30
p.m.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
662-4466
Sunday:
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship.
12:00-Coffee Hour.
4:00 p.m.-Undergraduate Fellow-
ship and Supper.
3:30 p.m.-Bonhoffer Seminar.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER
j502 E. Huron--663-9376
Ronald E. Cary, Minister
Worship- a.m.; Bible School-n
a. m.
CAMPUS CHAPEL-A Campus
Ministry of the Christian
Reormed Church
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10 a.m.-Service of Holy Communion
-"Give Us Bread NOW."
6 p.m.-Evening Worship.
Midweek Warship-12:10 p.m. and
10.p.m.
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
~31Thomson--663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-5 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5p.m.
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship--11:00 a.m.
Bible Study-"Revelation"--9.30'.
a.m.
Fellowship Supper-6:00 p.m.-(Pot-
luck. No charge but bring a dish to
share).
Program-7:00 p.m. - "Hunger in
Ann Arbor."

By DAN OBERDORFER
The Michigan branch of the National
Weather Service, accustomed to scan-
ning the heavens from a cramped little
office at Detroit's Metro Airport, will
move into the spacious new Federal
Building in Ann Arbor on October 30.
But that doesn't mean different
weather, or even different forecasts,
according to meteorologist C.R. Snider,
spokesperson for the bureau.

Four Tmore indicted
on1 narcotics charges

"THERE WILL BE no improvement
in weather service for Ann Arbor," Sni-
der said. "Externally, public service
will remain the same." Currently the
only weather information readily avail-
able to local residents is a recorded
telephone forecast sponsored by a local
bank.
One change which will be made in
November is the addition of ten-day
forecasts. Like the three-to-five-day
forecast, the ten-day forecast is ac-

By M. EILEENIDALEY
Four more persons have been indic-
ted in the string of drug-related arrests
launched by the Washtenaw Area Nar-
cotics Team (WANT) Thursday,
bringing the number of persons
charged to 25.
The four men-John Baker, Robert
Curry, 15aniel Sander, and Freddie
Luckett-were already in police
custody when warrants for their arrest
were issued by prosecuting attorney
William Delhey Thursday.
THF-25 ARRESTS are the product of
a six-month investigation conducted by
WANT, in an effort to round-up area

drug dealers. Police were led to the
suspects through drug purchases made
by WANT undercover officers.
According to WANT's Lt. Jim Hen-
derson, those arrested were not con-
sidered "big time dealers," but most
could easily supply a buyer with $1000
to $1500 worth of illegal drugs.
Thursday's arrests were a joint effort
of WANT, the Washtenaw County
Sheriff's Department and Ann Arbor
and Ypsilanti City Police.
In yesterday's raids, police con-
fisicated small amounts of heroin,
cocaine, speed and marijuana as well
as a few firearms.

curate only to a point.
According to the weather service, the
short range temperature forecast is
correct to within two degrees, while
precipitation forecasts are right about
B5 to 90 percent of the time.
"THE 24- TO 48-HOUR forecasts
seem to be accurate to their natural
limit," Snider said. "They haven't im-
proved in 20 years.
Ann Arbor will also become the'
Michigan relay station for the national
weather network, synthesizing data col-
lected at Metro and. the other eight
regional offices. The predictions are
then sent along a weather wire andF
picked up by major newspapers and
weather forecasters throughout the
country.
Affected/ by the move are 22 fore-
casters now based at theaairport and
three from Lansing. Several have
already relocated in Ann Arbor. The
move has been planned since last
spring when the General Services Ad-
ministration gave its approval.
The Michigan branch has been look-
ing for a new location since its creation
in 1968.
"Every forecaster is convinced that
his region is the most difficult," Snider
says. "But winds off the Great Lakes
make Michigan exceptionally diffi-
cult."
hicago 7

Kenworthy hits sloppy defendant
investment supervision joins fed

l

(continued from Page 1)
The Controller's office initiated
a transaction with Merrill Lynch on,
June 30, in which the money the city
had invested in the arbitrage was
returned in full. The city then
reinvested the money the very next
day in another arbitrage transaction.'
IN CITY Administrator Sylvester
Murray's report on the unauthorized
transaction of September 21, Murray,
said the effect of the June 30
transaction was "to misrepresent the
city's financial condition at the end of
its fiscalyear."
The city reported a budget surplus
of $2.6 iillion at the end of the 1976-77,
fiscal year. Without the Controller's
office "attempt to cover up the city's
losses, the budget surplus would
have been cut in half.
Kenworthy's report also asks why
the proper officials in city govern-
ment were not informed of the
unauthorized losing transactions un-
til September 13.
KENWORTHY points to an April
27, 1977 memo that was a change of
policy "unauthorized by the Adminis-
tratbr or Council. "He also ques-
tions the propriety of the city's
speculation of tax revenue without
the knowledge of the city's citizens.
'The use of city money in arbit

rage was in no way an investment,
for the city was not purchasing a
fixed asset, not assuring itself of any
expected rate of return," the state-
ment reads. "The public expects the
city to prudently invest any short
term cash surpluses to insure a rate
of return without risking the prin-
ciple. Nobody working for the city
has the right to speculate with public
funds at any time."
Murray is still investigating the
possibility of disciplining city offi-
cials because of the unauthorized
investments and the cover up. Mur-
ray said he is still trying to discern
"who knew-what when." -
The state Treasurer's Office is
looking into the transaction to see if
the city violated, state law. An
employe of the office earlier this
week categorized the transactions as
"questionable."' The state's investi-
gation is currently at a standstill,
waiting for an audit of the transac-
tions being conducted by the account-
ing firm of Icerman, Johnson, and
Hoffman. The audit should be com-
pleted early next week.

payroll
WASHINTON (AP)-John Froines, a
defendant in the Chicago Seven antiwar
conspiracy trial of the 1960s, has joined
the Carter administration as a $36,000-a-
year bureaucrat with the Occupational
Safety and Health Administration.
The Labor Department agency an-
nounced the appointment yesterday in
a routine news release, describing
Froines' expertise in chemistry, in-
dustrial hygiene and toxic substances.
No mention was made of the trial,.at
which Froines was acquitted.
FROINES, NOW 38, was a welli
known activist in the civil rights and"
antiwar movements before moving into
academia and, more recently, the
public health field.
A chemist with a doctorate from Yale
University, he came to OSHA from
Vermont, where he was the state's oc-
cupational health director for the past
three years.
"Some people say we in the
movement have lost and given up ..
but "I haven't changed," Froines said.

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Join The
Daily Staff

'U' profs spar over
merits of Bakke case

x_._

WHEN DO MUSIC MAJORS
SAY BUDWEISER?

(Continued from Page I
"This issue before us is not affir-
mative action. The issue is whether we
may appropriately, institutionally, give
preference by race." Cohen cited the
"equal rights" clause of the fourteenth
Amendment as legal basis for his
argument.
Sandelow, professor in the Law
School and author of the brief filed by
the Association of American Law
Schools in behalf of the University of
California, largely based his argument
on the historical inequities in American
race relations. He challenged Cohen's
legal interpretation of the Fourteenth
Amendment and quoted a mountain of
statistics indicating that if not for
special admissions programs, minority

representation in graduate schools and
professions would be negligible.
CLOSING HIS first round remarks,
Sandelow assailed Cohen. "Professor
Cohen's philosophy is a philosophy of a
society without a past, but that is not
the society in which we live."
After each party had a chance for a
brief rebuttal, the debate was opened
up to audience for questions.
The majority of the questioners, both
black and white, addressed themselves,
to Cohen's argument, and many of
them angrily attacked his positions
Cohen, not always dispassionate,
managed to parry most of thequeries;,
as did Sandelow.

~- 4 :-- .4
" ,. .;s,

jt "Stimulating...
*spssi~ne '", lucid and
exciting."
-Norman
_ 4 ..MMailer

x'Ilt

'C% rN y

::.4J

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