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September 30, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-30

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nber 30, 1977-The Michigan Daily

lying ice cream cones
pause three-car crash

Something for all,
but few takers at fair

By DEBBIE LEKASHMAN

est Quad residents tossing ice
am cones out windows were blamed
a three-car accident at the inter-
ion of Thompson and E. Madison St.
night.
wo cars were paused at the stop sign
he intersection when a third vehicle,
ten by Mike Backos, 19, plowed into

i
i

I

j@g*
Just fo the
health o fit,

them from the rear. Backos'explained
that he had been distracted by the ice
cream cones West Quad residents were
throwing at passing cars.
"THEY WERE THROWING these
cones, and I must've looked up,
although I don't really remember doing
so. I had my mind on the cones and hit
the car in front of me," Backos said.
The second car, driven by Jim Berta-
kis, 20, was then pushed into the rear
of the first car in a chain reaction.
Driver and passengers of, the first vehi-
cle are unknown.
Backos received cuts and abrasions
while his brother, Sam Backos, a pass-
enger in the car, escaped injury.
BERTAKIS suffered a nose injury.
"This happens every year," said an
unidentified police officer who respond-
ed to the call.
"I wish they'd stop serving those
West Quad residents ice cream cones."

Get moving, America!
March 1-7. 1977 is
National Physical Education and Sport Week
Physical Education Public Information
American, Alliance for Health.
Physical Education and Recreation
1201 116th St N W. Washington. 0DC 20036

r

The Wolverines aren't the only
No. I team
in Ann Arbor
CMQLSON
CANAIAN
BEEo R
MPORTED
on rf

Daily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
Richard Ziegler tries to catch a Lacrosse toss under the tutelege of
Michigan Lacrosse team goalie Mike Bucci at yesterday's Student Ac-
tivities Fair.
All men interested in Fraternities
are invited to a
RUSH PARTY
Friday, September 30-8:30 p.m.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
920 Baldwin 761-9167
BEER, MUSIC, FOOD

By BRIAN BLANCHARD
It was your chance to save the whales
or your soul, join the lacrosse club or
rifle association, sign a petition to the
Soviet Union, or have your blood pres-
sure taken before the midterm pres-
sures start to take their toll.
In short, it was a chance to watch
acronyms come to life and tell their
stories in the Union Ball room at yester-
day's Student Organizations Activities
Fair.
BUT YOU probably missed the activ-
ity.
From 2 p.m.-10 p.m., the people sit-
ting patiently behind the tables lining
the walls of the spacious Ballroom out-
numbered.the curious students.
An LSA tophomore, Debbie Longa-
necker, said the fair was a good idea,
but that she never would have gone if
she hadn't come to run the Christian
Science table. "Most of these groups I
didn't know about," she said.
According to University Activities
Center member Larry Pulkownik, "It
was plopped down on us at the last min-
ute," so that the publicity for the fair
wasn't very widespread. "We'll prob-
ably have one every semester, but
there just wasn't one group that focused
on this."
NONETHELESS, the clubs and so-
cieties made the most of the afternoon
and dished out pamphlets and minute-
long summaries of their interests.
"We are not ROTC," declared a sign
on the table for the Rifle Club. Gary
Stoddard, president of the club, had
only one signature on a list for stu-
dents wanting to shoot at targets in the
North University Building on Sundays,
but he had spoken with a few other curi-
ous students.
Next door, Libertarian John Warsop
said his organization only asks that "we
shouldn't let government do anything
that you wouldn't let an individual do,"
like take money in the form of taxes.
Warsop, a graduate chemistry student,
said the group is having trouble filling
its ranks because of "the political
apathy on campus."
At the Greenpeace table, Tina
Passint explained that it takes $200 a
day to support Greenpeace volunteers
who float the high stas trying to pro-
tect whales. "Yeah," she said, trying to
describe the volunteers, "they're sort
of heroes."
PEOPLE WANDERED through the
vast assortment of tables piled with lit-

ch c,...~se
specinL $RI/#OS

are you sure
you know
what family'
planning
is all
Ifyo hikabout?
If outhnkfamily planning means
-* taking measures to prevent
unwanted pregnancies .you're
only partially right. Family
planning does help you have
children when you want them..
can afford them the best,. .. and
can lovecth ~~llIost 2'-
But dIia you know it also means:
" improving the health of mother and baby
" counseling men on their role andl respon-
sibility in family planning.
" helping couples who want to have children
but can't.
* counseling young people about how having
a baby can affect their health and their lives.
Be sure you know AILL about family plannhing
it means more than you may have thought.
All these services are available from the family planning
clinic in your communityv{,ut' local health department
or your own physician.

erature about Christian Science and the
Bahai Faith, Mormonism and Tran-
scendental Meditation, Campus Cru-'
sade for Christ and the Union of Stu-
dents for Israel.
The Jewish student group had a peti-
tion calling for the Soviet Union to
honor the Helsinki accords in the area
of human rights. The organization will
send the signatures to Soviet officials to
demonstrate support for their cause.
At the Mormon table, a black student
asked two well dressed young men if
"blacks can't go to your Mormon hea-
ven?" They explained that the only
"limitation" on black Mormons is that
they can't be priests.
Limitations on members of the L5
Society are as far as the stars. "Space
settlements will only be a reality if we
make it happen," explains a handout
from the Arizona based group.
SENIOR DARYL BALCHAN, a mem-
ber of the lacrosse club, joined the team
because "size isn't a limitation." Late
in the afternoon, a couple of players
tossed a hard rubber lacross ball back
and forth to demonstrate what lures 50
flinging and running players to spend
the spring on the field.
The American Medical Student As-
sociation provided free blood pressure
and eye tests to students in the hall
leading into the Ballroom. The medical
students giving the services said that
the Association was formed to give stu-
dents a chance to get practical experi-
ence outside "the institutional environ-
ment of medical school."
There were many other friendly peo-
ple, but you'll just have to catch them
next semester.
Drop-add,
ends with.
long line
(Continued from Page 1)
do it,"said a two-year CRISP veteran.
DESPITE THE delay, Associate
Registrar Douglas Wooley said yester-
day compared favorably to other last
days. "I've had a lot of last days and I
think we're in good shape.
"We kept the door open an extra 1054
minutes for those who were late," he
added.
Roland Hersh, who compiles student
election worksheets, estimated that
nearly 1,800 students passed through
CRISP yesterday. "I think it's a good
learning experience. You have to do
this all your life-stand in lines, deal
with computers," he said.
ONE COMPUTER terminal operator
lauded students for moving through the
line with little difficulty. "I think they
have been great," said Carl Daehler
"Actually there have been very few up
set students. Most of the problems stem
from departments giving students the
wrong information."
"That's the problem-ignorance,"'
added a programmer at an neighboring
terminal. "People get those CRISP in-
structions and then wad them up and
throw them away."
Noreen, the woman who, checked
asppointment cards at the beginning of
the CRISP line, offered a suggestion for
avoiding long lines on the last day..
"They should reward those who come
early. People who came late had three
weeks to do it.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Volume LXXXVIII, No. 20
Friday, September 30, 1977
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor; Michigan 48109
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning.
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer sessionpublished Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
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