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September 25, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Steelworker layoffs
costly to mining town
(Continued from Page 1)

THE

CHRISTIAN ROOTS
OF
ANTI-SEMITISM
A TALK BY:
Dr. Rosemary Ruether Garett
Theological Seminary Leading Catholic Theologian, Author of:'
Faith and Fratricide, Images of Women in the Judaeo-Christian
Tradition, other books and articles.
At: Bna'i B'rith Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill Street
Sunday, September 26-8:00 P.M.
PUBLIC IS WELCOME,

is orange, the river is brown and the ground is black and fret-
ted everywhere by railroad tracks.
YOU DON'T enter a steel mill so much as descend into it.
The first day on the job, you're told not to get hurt and then
they just let you watch. It takes time to get acquainted with
the mounds of slag and coal, the smokestacks, the open hear-
the furnances, the cranes and ladles built on a scale suitable
for Paul Bunyan, the extreme heat and extreme noise, and
the glowing, molten iron.
Thereis no closing or opening time here. The mills are
always busy, round-the-clock and every day, even on
Christmas. That is, that's how it used to be.
"I remember this old man who was retired," Bob says,
"but he still would come down to the gate or the club to talk to
his buddies and ask about the mill. He just wanted to keep in
touch." one steelworker recounts.
UNTIL NOW, steelworkers in the "Steel Valley" had
come down to the gate, lunch bucket in hand, much as their
fathers did and grandfathers did. It is rare to meet someone
in Youngstown whose family has not had at least one mem-
ber working in the mills.
"Slovaks, Poles, Italians, Germans, and later blacks, all
came here because this was the gateway to the good life,"
says Thomas Shipka, a philosophy professor at Youngstown
State University and the son of Al Shipka, a famous union
organizer here. "The work in the mills gave them security,
self-respect and an identity."
The early steelworkers labored under a paternalistic
system. There were company stores and company-built houses
within walking distances of the mills. In the old days, there
might be a chicken waiting for the workers on Christmas.
Perhaps the company would pass out free clothes, haul the
workers on flat-bed railroad cars to Youngstown and make
them march in a political parade for some important
Republican.
THIS WAS Little Steel country, and across the state line in
Pittsburg was Big Steel country. In 1937, Al Shipka led the so-
called Little Steel strike that eventually resulted in the
recognition of the United Steelworkers of America.
The union hall, such as the one for local 2163 in Struthers
down the road from one gate to the steel mill, became the
center of labor activity but social acitivity as well. It was rdot

uncommon, for instance, to hold a wedding reception there.
"Why go to college when that means losing three or four
years of seniority," Eshenbaugh says, half seriously and half
sarcastically.
After five years on the job a steelworker might be earning
more than $16,000, depending on his job and amount of over-
time. But fringe benefits make the job more attractive. He's
provided with life insurance, a pension, a dental plan, a
discount on prescription drugs, scholarships for part-time at-
tendance at college. "When my wife had the baby," Bob ex-
plains, "the $2,200 it cost was all paid for.
"PEOPLE ARE always coming up to me and sayhing,
'Oh. you're a steelworker? You've got it made,' "says Dan
Eshenbaugh, Bob's brother.
Dan's last day of work was Friday. On Thursday he and
Bob drove to New Stanton, Pa., where Volkswagen will open
an automobile plant.
"They gave us an application and told us to mail it back,"
Dan says. "They asked me what skill I had and I didn't know
what to say except that I was a laborer."
THE STEELWORKERS' frustrations L'gin to hit bottom
at this point. Outside the steel mill, most of them have no
specialty. Theirs is not a skill that can be transferred.
Steve Rickard, 31, and a handful of his friends are at the
local 2163 union hl discussing this very problem. "My
father worked in the mills for 30 years. Everything we ever
had comes from Sheet & Tube. It's been good to us. I've
travelled all over the country, but this is where Ilike to live,
my roots are here. It may not look like much to an outsider,
but to us, looking at those smokestacks is like looking at a
tree. It's beautiful."
One of his friends, who didn't want to be identified, took
up the argument. "What can I tell a future employer? That I
know how steel is made?
"Can I tell him that I've seen men's trousers catch on fire
because they got too close to the furnace, that you have to
wear longjohns in July to keep the heat off your legs, that I've
seen men faint from the heat, that our crew received orange
windbreakers because we set a production record?'
Another steelworker expresses what to them is an
inescapable conclusion. "We're supposed to work, draw our
paychecks, make the company prosper and be loyal. Don't
you think the company or the government should be loyal to
us and feel some responsibility for us?"

2

almao IS

114 L Washington
Downtown
Ann Arbor

Collins
tries to
block his
transfer}
By KEITH RICHBURG
Convicted sex-slayer John Norman
Collins will again go to court, this time
attempting to block his transfer from
Jackson State Prison to a more secure
facility at Marquette.
In a hearing set for October 21 in
Jackson County Circuit Court, Collins'
attorney, Riccardo Arcaro, will also
argue to have Collins released from
solitary confinement and be "put back
in with the general prison population."
COLLINS, THE former Centerline
High Schgol athlete, has been confined
in Jackson since his conviction in the
1969 sex-slaying of Eastern Michigan
University student Karen Sue
Beineman.
Beineman's murder was the last in a
strong of sex-slayings that chilled the
Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti area during the
late 1960's. Collins, who steadfastly
maintained his innocence, was never
prosecuted for any of the other attacks
Collins was considered a model
prisoner at Jackson State until being
linked to the recent escape of fellow in-
mate Robert Taylor. Collins allegedly
helped Taylor escape, and the freeli
convict was reportedly scheduled to r-
turn for Collins in a helicopter.
ARCARO, HOWEVER, terms a*r
reported helicopter escape plans "a-
surd."
Collins' planned transfer to Mar-
quette is tied to his alleged role in the
escape plot. Arcaro may argue that Co
lins was not involved after all, althoug
he refused to discuss the specifies for
fear of "retribution" against Collins
from other prisoners.
Arcaro will also protest the transfe
by arguing that at Marquette, Collins
would be too distant from his newly-a
tained Detroit attorney, George Mann
"HE IS NOT from a moneyed back.
ground," Arcaro said of Collins. "His
relationship with his attorney a
guaranteed under the sixth amendment
will be seriously impaired."
The Detroit attorney may try to re
new Collins' efforts to have his convic
tioi overturned All previous appeals
efforts, however, have been rejected
Arcaro said that his only job is to bloclr
Collins' transfer and "get him out of
that segregation unit."
"That effort is separate and apart
from any attempt to overturn his con-
viction," he said.
In arguing to have Collins released
from solitary confinement, Arcaro will
attempt to prove his client is impris-
oned there "because of his notoriety."
OLD GLORY IN BATTLE
The American flag first unfurled in
battle two hundred years ago Septem-
ber 3. 700 Regulars under General Wil-
liam Maxwell ambushed British and
Hessian troops under Generals Howe
and Cornwallis at Cooch's Bridge, Del-
ware. While the British won the battle,
it had little effect on the war. The walk
approaching the Independence Hall en-
trance to Henry Ford Museum in Dear
born, Michigan, is flanked by ten
historic flags from America's history.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVIII,No.16
Sunday, September 25,1977
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

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Kent gym assa led
(Continued from Page 1)
a federal civil suit on behalf of coalition members arrested at earlier gym
protests. The suit was filed not only against university officials, but Portage
Countyofficials and jail personnel as well, for alleged mistreatment of those
arrested. F
A spokesman for the Kent State Black Student Alliance proclaimed at the
rally that "a time comes when silence is betrayal." He called the building of
a gym on the sit. of the shootings "sacrilege."
AFTER APPLAUDING and chanting throughout numerous speeches,
demonstrators began a march across the Kent State campus. The group,
eight abreast and hundreds long, stopped at four buildings before proceeding
to the new gym site. They dedicated each structure in memory of one of the
slain students.
"!""!s!"ssss"!!ss"!"asl!!lscoceccsscccosseeccccsccsece*@ece*Ceecsss
TUESDAY, September 27 12Noon
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"THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
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Professor James Brinkerhoff
VICE PRESIDENT FOR FINANCIAL AFFAIRS
AT THE
international Center, 603 E. Madison;
F The Tuesday Lunch-Discussions are held weekly during fall and winter terms, and are sponsored by the .
Ecumenical Campus Center and the international Center. Lunch is provided for $1.00 and is served by:
" Church Women United in Ann Arbor.
" "
* C*************** ****************

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ATTENTION
Student Organizations.
Have you registered yet for the
STUDENT ORGANIZATION ACTIVITY FAIR?
DATE: Thurs. Sept. 29
TIME: 1:00 p. m. to 10:00 p.m.
PLACE: Michigan Union Ballroom

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