100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 20, 1977 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, September 20, 1977-Page 5
li

Bullard won't lead floor
fight on pot legislation

THE FOLKS EXPECT YOU TO

WRITE HOME ONCE IN A WHILE..

0

By GREGG KRUPA
Rep. Perry Bullard's perennial lib-
eralized marijuana bill will be up for a
vote again this fall, but Bullard won't
be leading the fight for its approval.
Bullard said, "In an effort to decide
the question on the issues, in a rational
manner," he has seen to it that debate
on the bill will be conducted by other
members of the House. Bullard has also
reached an agreement with Represen-
tative Matthew McNeely (D-Detroit),
that neither Representative will speak
during the debate on the controversial
bill.
IT WAS AFTER an emotional speech
by McNeely, in which he related his
son's fatal narcotic overdose to his
early experience with marijuana, that
Bullard became involved in an alterca-
tion with another Detroit Represen-
tative Rosetta Ferguson on the floor of
the House.
Bullard was hit twice by Ferguson,
once with an open hand and once with
an ashtray.
I don't think the incident will have
much impact on the final vote," Bullard
said. But he has taken steps to remove
himself from floor leadership on the bill
that he sponsors.
THE PROPOSED liberalization will
be considered this Thursday or early
next week. Bullard remains confident
the bill will pass this time around.
"We have undertaken an extensive
citizens' lobbying effort across the state
this summer," said Bullard. "I THINK
THIS WILL HAVE AN AFFECT ON
SOME OF THE LEGISLATORS."

Bullard almost succeeded in passing
the bill this fall. But on a reconsidera-
tion vote after McNeeley's emotion-
laden address, the House defeated the
bill.
BULLARD'S BILL would do away
with all penalties for the private pos-
sessions of up to 100 grams - approxi-
mately three-and-a-half ounces of
marijuana. The bill provides for a $50
fine for public possession of the same
amount.
As this fall's session begins, Bullard
is also interested in passing a bill that
will end mandatory retirement for
many employes.
Under the measure, any person able
to perform job duties satisfactorily
could not be forced by their employer to
retire. The bill requires the Civil Rights
Commission to establish procedures for
employers to use in determining an em-
ploye's ability to perform job functions.
Excluded from the prohibition are fire-
fighters and law enforcement officials.
"I INTRODUCED this bill becagse
the advantages it would provide far
outweigh the costs imposed, and be-
cause it is my feeling that mandatory
retirement is definitely discrimina-
tory," said Bullard. "In my opinion,
forced retirement is definitely
discriminatory ... forced retirement
can contribute to, or cause, mental or
physical health problems for older
workers."
The bill will face strong union oppo-
sition. A spokesperson for the AFL-CIO
said the giant labor confederation
would oppose the bill on the grounds
that retirement policies should be sub-
ject to collective bargaining and not the
legislative process.
Bullard disagrees.
"MANDATORY RETIREMENT is a

civil rights issue, and therefore a sub-
ject the House and Senate should be
very concerned with," said Bullard.
House Speaker Bobby Crim said yes-
terday that it is likely the state will
follow the lead of the federal gover-
nment in halting the use of taxpayers'
funds for abortions, this fall
Although both he and Governor Wil-
liam Milliken are opposed to the cutoff
of Medicaid funds for abortions, Crim
said it was likely that the state legis-
lature will pass such a bill.
Milliken has not announced whether
he would veto the cutoff.
"My position has been and continues
to be that I am opposed to abortion,"
said Crim. "However, iftyou're going to
have abortions legalized, I don't think it
should be a situation where those who
are affluent can get them, and those
who are poor will not have them ... un-
der that circumstance I have no objec-
tion to funds being used."
The Hawaiian Islands were made
known to the Western world by
British explorer Captain James
Cook, who naned them the Sandwich
Islands after the Earl of Sandwich.

Professional
Hair Care
Services and Products
U-M Stylists
at the
UNION
Dave, Harold, & Chet

*4
-E
HERE'S AN EASIER WAY

if
you
see
news'
happen
call
76-DAILY

GEO Membership Meeting
8:00 in Rackham Amphitheatre
Tuesday, September 20

Agenda:
1.
2.
3.

Raises in Escrow
Tuition Hikes
Regents Vote to Appeal ULP MERC

x tU
- - -

Introducing the
Hand-Me-Up Calculators.
Even after you graduate, Sharp Scientifics
still help you make the grade.

TO WRITE HOME -

SIX DAYS A WEEK!

Choose the Sharp Scientific Calcu-
lator that's tailor-made for your college
or professional studies.
And that very same Sharp will prove
invaluable long after you graduate. The
reason? Sharp builds calculators so soph-
isticated, you never outgrow them. And

the longer you use your Sharp, the more
you'll appreciate Sharp's world-famous
quality. What's more, every Sharp is
priced with your budget in mind.
In every way, it pays to get Sharp.
The Hand-Me-Up Calculators.

Dear Mom and Dad:
1 I thought you might like to know what school is like for me every day. The Michigan I
Daily is the University's daily newspaper. It brings the most complete coverage of I
1 Campus news six days a week . . . not to mention community, state and national I
1 coverage, a Sunday magazine; sports, features and editorials, and more!
1 Just fill out this form and mail, with your check to:
1 The Michigan Daily/420 Maynard/Ann Arbor, M, 48109 I
1 That way we'll have lots to discuss about living in Ann Arbor, and my days at
1 Michigan, the next time I come home.
1 1
1 LEAVE 5LANK YS; j" a t') ts b s c r: b e to 'T HE AVE LANK
MICHIGA.N DAILY. !cicree to be !!ed iate-
1 (pre-pavment rece-sary f-r subs. outside of
Ann Arbor, M ch.
I .ON.r EiMSTERF. TW :StMESTs-RS PERMANENT I
ucmaoticolly renewed
_..._____ter)_
SCHEDULE OF PRICES: For Circulation Dept. Use Only
$12 SEPT. thru APRIL (2 Se mesters) I JStencil Typed
S$1 3 by Mail outsi de .Ann Arbor
$6. 50 per Semester Number of papers.-.--L
$7.00 by Mail outside Ann Arbor
IAmount Due $ -
1 I I
I Date Started
(Please Print) Last Name First Middle Initial I Code 3 I
1 I.D. No._Phone No._ _ _(circle one).
I 4: J-Ap. 1: S-D

15 scientific functions, including
log/trig. Memory. 8-digit scien-
tific notation. Batteries included.

19 scientific functions: trig, logs,
y to the x power, eX and 1W.
Factorial key, square root, cube
root, and pi. Batteries included.

Elegantly thin. With leather-
grained wallet and memo pad. 21
scientific functions, plus statisti-
cal functions. Batteries included.

- - - ~i~ MOM M M: TL.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan