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September 20, 1977 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-20

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rMuJSEE N S APPQE ( AAL fAD
Statement
If you chanced to pass by artist Charles Ginnever's "Daedalus"
sculpture shortly after it was installed on the Art Museum lawn last
week, you may have seen another type of artistic statement - a price
tag plaed by Lionel Biron on the giant metal edifice. "The price tag is
a poetic metaphor," said Biron, "and should not be taken at face value
alone." In a news release handed out on the spot Biron informed the
public that the $500,000 price tag - a figure arrived at partially by
adding labor and material costs - was not a criticism of the unusual
sculpture. "What shocks most people in my assertion is not the rela-
tive aesthetic worth of the two works of art," Biron said, referring to
"Daedalus" and the price tag, "but the genuine challenge it presents
to economic assumptions upon which our society rests. In other words,
if I were given 'a half million dollars for the price tag and the sculptor
only received 10 per cent of this amount, this would seriously upset
generally held beliefs as to what constitutes the apparently logical
distribution of moneyin our society." Hmmm...
?n t
What price art?
Happenings .
...chew and think at a luncheon talk on "Racial Preference in
Higher Education" with Prof. Terrance Sandalow in the International
Center, 603 E. Madison, at noon ... The Gay Academic Union meets at
612 S.Forest at noon ... the Center also offers a program on graduate
scholarships abroad, from 3 to 5 ... learn about lake to lake resusci-
tation at a speech by John Bennet of the Great Lakes Environmental
Research Laboratory on "Simulation of Long Term Circulation of
Lake Ontario" at 3:45 in Room 165 of the Chrysler Center ... Dr. Ray
Heffer will speak on "Putting Child Abuse in Perspective" at Schlor-
ing Auditorium at 4 p.m. ... ham it up with the UM Amateur Radio
Club during its first meeting at 7:30 in Room 4203 of the Union ..: the
Michigan Economic Society will meet at 7:30 in Room 102 of the Econ
building ... Michigan Student Assembly meets at 7:30 on the third floor
of the Union ... pianist Maria Meirelles will perform the fourth in-
stallment of her series of Beethoven sonatas at 8 p.m. at Rackham
and the Ann Arbor Democratic Party will hold a general meeting in
the Public Library meeting room, also at 8 p.m.
On the outside
Summer is a goin' out. Today will be cooler and cloudier, with a
high of only 64 and a 30 per cent chance of showers. As for tonight,
there's good news and bad news. The good news is, it won't rain. The
bad'news is, tpleow will dip to a chilly 46.

Carter
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Carter
administration opened a new round of
Middle East diplomacy yesterday with
Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan
and said it would be willing to talk with
the Palestine Liberation Organization
(PLO) if the group accepts United Na-
tions resolutions recognizing Israel.
Dayan carried to President Carter
and Secretary of State Cyrus Vance
proposals for a settlement that would
return some territories to the Arab
countries but maintain Israel military
control over the west bank of the Jor-
dan River.
Administration officials, while not
optimistic about a breakthrough in
negotiations, emphasized a determina-
tion to get the Palestinians admitted to
the peace table.
THE ADMINISTRATION said the

,Dayan
United States "would be wi ing to talk them."
with the PLO if they accept 242 and Thed
338," the 1967 and 1973 Security Council sponseI
resolutions implying acceptance of Is- briefing
rael's existence and promoting peace- by refer
ful settlement of the Arab-Israeli con- Dayar
flict. surroun
But a State Department spokesman, After b(
in making the statement, said the Brussels
United States "is not in the business of went to]
imposing our views" and that all par- to Israe
ties to the dispute must agree on who Minister
can participate at the Geneva confer- "I tho
ence the administration hopes to have to himc
reconvened by the end of the year. way," D
THROUGHOUT the summer the ad- went ba
ministration invited the PLO to accept ministe
the U.N. resolutions. President Carter THEI
in August said if the Palestinians took ed, how(
that step it "would open a new oppor- had talk
tunity for us to start discussions with tion it w

The Michigan Daily--Tuesday, September 20, 1977-Page 3
begin talks

C---

department's statement, in re-
to questions at the daily news
g, appeared to go a step further
rring to the PLO directly.
n arrived with some mystery
ding his travels of recent'days.
oarding a flight to New York in
s he disembarked secretly and
Paris for a day before returning
el Sunday to confer with Prime
r Menahem Begin.
ught it was worthwhile to report
about the meeting I had on my
Dayan said. "That's what I did. I
ck to Israel and told the prime
r about it."
FOREIGN MINISTER declin-
ever, to divulge with whom he
ked - there has been specula-
as with an Arab official - and
urried him to their meeting be-

fore other questions could be asked
Tomorrow, the Egyptian foreign min-
ister, Ismail Fahmy, is due here fort
talks with Carter and Vance. Next Wed-
nesday it will be Syrian Foreign Min-
ister Abdel Halim Khaddam's turn.
Dayan's arrival sparked renewed'
controversy over the attack by IsraelF
on the U.S. research vessel Liberty dur-
ing the 1967 Middle East war. Thirty-,
four Americans were killed in the at-
tack.
PALESTINIAN sympathizers releas-
ed three documents obtained from the
Central Intelligence Agency that they
said showed Dayan deliberately or-
dered the strafing by air and sea at-
tack.
Dayan, responding to a questiop,
said, "We didn't know at the time that it
was an American ship. It was close to
the shore. We just were mistaken.

Ky. club s fire exists
were routinely locked

Vance h

I.

CINCINNATI (AP) - A waitress
working in the Beverly Hills Supper
Club the night a fire killed 164 people
told a congressional hearing yesterday
that fire doors at the supper club rour
tinely were kept locked. Janetta John-
son, who was injured trying to get out of
the overcrowded Cabaret Room, also
said aisles leading to the room's single
exit were blocked by tables and chairs.
"It was like trying to get an egg into a
Coke bottle," she said of the jam up at
the door.
"I just knew that smoke was going to
kill me. People were screaming and
pushing trying to get through that sin-
gle exit door."
JOHNSON SAID she had seen the fire
doors unlocked "perhaps eight times"
in the;two years she worked there. She
testified she saw an employe unlock
back fire doors the night of the May 28
fire.
She was one of a series of witnesses

testifying about the fire before the sub-
committee on Consumer Protection and
Finance of the House Committee on In-
terstate and Foreign Commerce.
KENTUCKY GOV. Julian Carroll
predicted yesterday morning that the
owners of the club and former state
Fire Marshal John Calvert might be in-
dicted for "clearly illegal and malici-
ous" activities and for their total dis-
regard for the safety of Beverly Hills
patrons.
He charged that Richard Schilling
and his sons, owners of the club, had en-
gaged in a "conspiracy" with archi-
tects and electrical workers to violate
state building codes.
Carroll, the first to testify yesterday,
told the committee he was going to
place the fire marshal's office "in such
order that there are no more tragedies
it is within the power of the agency to
prevent."

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COMING OUT GROUPS FOR MEN
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feelings " starting in late September " meeting
once a week for three hours for ten weeks * an
opportunity to give support and be supported by
people in your same situation * call Tom or Tony
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IF THE SHOE FITS
PRAGUE, Czechoslovakia (AP) -
Czech children have larger feet than
previous generations, according to a
market research study conducted
here..
The study has found thatmore than
50 per cent of 13-year-old boys and
over, 80 per cent. who are 14 and 15
must buy men's sizes. Twenty-five.
per cent of the girls in 13-15 age group
buy women's shoes.
Children's clothing and shoes are
state-subsidized in this country, and
the price difference between shoes
for children and adults is greater
than in the West.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVIII, No. l
Tuesday. September 20, 1977'
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan*48109. Pub-
lished daily Tuesday through Sunday morning dur-
ing the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:.
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS
ARE CONCERNED WITH:"
NON-DISCRIMINATION
The University of Michigan is committed to a policy of NON-DISCRIMINATION
on the basis ofsex, age, race, color, religion, creed, national origin,
ancestry, physical or mental handicap and Vietnam veteran status.
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
To assure equal treatment and opportunity, The University takes AFFIRMA-
TIVE ACTION on the basis of sex, race, handicap, or Vietnam Veteran
status.
COMMITMENTS
These commitments apply in admission, access to, treatment and employ-
ment in all University programs and activities.
CONTACT
If you have any concerns, questions or complaints, contact:
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS
5072 Administration Bldg.
763-0235

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