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September 18, 1977 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-18

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Page 4-Sunday, September 18, 1977-The Michigan Daily

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Eighty-Eight Years of Editorial Freedom
420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, M1 48109
Vol. L.XXXVIi No. 10 News Phone: 764-0552
Edited and managed by students at the University of Michigan

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LOOKING BACK

HILE THE WOLVERINES were
disappointing their fans with yes-
terday's dismal performance, several
fans were busy doing some disappoint-
ing of their own by rekindling the age-
old tradition of passing up women from
the bottom of the stadium to the top.
Several groups on campus have
called for an end to this degrading and
dangerous practice, but some people
just don't know when to quit. In past
years, many women have been injured
while being passed up and many others
have been emotionally and physically
degraded. To be grabbed, kicking and
screaming from one's seat, and thrust
into the air with hundreds of hands hit-
ting, pinching, and even probing one's
body is not our idea of funl.It is a blatant
de ial of a woman's right to sit in peace
and enjoy the game.
This tradition is nothing more than

the most base example of men's attempt
to rule over women, by denying their
rights through use of sheer force.
BUT THIS ISSUE transcends the phil-
osophical point of women's rights,
and the emotional damage it can cause.
It is downright physically dangerous.
Three years ago, a woman had her
blouse torn completely off, and two
years ago a woman broke her leg after
being dropped on the stadium steps
while in the process of being passed up,
and who knows how many other women
have been injured, but have simply kept
quiet about it?
The time to stop this humiliating and
dangerous practice is now, before any
more damage is done. Let's hope that at
next.weekend's game we can a 1 get our
fun just by watching the game, and let-
ting everyone else watch it too.

5iW 1ANNA Jvtk/ WIY WnREWITN
IH1W E1nID ZONPT? AFTER 'YWVE
BEEN HER E PHILE; )<D r1AYL
REALIZE THAT THE TEAS UMJIEER
ONE ALUNI o 'DFENDS OF THE
UNIVESITY A E MJEM R TQ AND
SrUDENTS Ib/ER $OMEWNERE EFWEEN
NUMBERS 47 AND 8
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Lance a lot
A SENATE PANEL began its
questioning of Budget Direc-
tor Bert Lance this week amid
mounting demands for Lance's
resignation. But Lance, speaking
before the Senate Governmental
Affairs Committee, continued to
protest his innocence.
"I have nothing to be ashamed
of, nothing to hide," Lance told
the committee Friday.
It was reported Wednesday
that a Justice Department probe
of the budget director's financial
dealings was called off shortly af-
ter Jimmy Carter was elected
president last winter. But the
U.S. attorney in charge of the in-
vestigation said he closed it for
lack of evidence.
And three top White House
aides admitted this week they
had read an FBI report on Lan-
ce's bank overdrafts but decided
not to let President Carter know
about it. Press Secretary Jody
Powell, Presidential Aide Hamil-
ton Jordan and Counsel Robert
Lipschutz said they may have
been guilty of faulty judgment,
and critics began to attack the
White House for staging a cover-
up of the Lance case.
The embattled budget director
found some support Friday from
Sen. Thomas Eagleton (D-Mo.),
who accused Lance's attackers of
using 'the same techniques of
character-assassination used by
the late Sen. Joseph McCarthy.
The remarks were aimed directly
at Lance's toughest critics,
Republican Senators Charles
Percy of Illinois and Charles
Mathias of Maryland.
Regents return
T HE REGENTS reminded the
rest of the campus just what
the Medical Center means to
them at their first monthly ses-
sion of the term Thursday and
Friday, painting with unfaltering
strokes a lush picture of future
University health programs and
medical buildings.
But during the same session a
professor gravely warned the top
administrators of the University
that an "erosion" in the quality of
teaching will result if the faculty
isn't paid more, and students ac-
cused the administration of
trying "bust" the Graduate Em-
ployees Union and in promoting
"slavery" in South Africa
through investments.
After a special presentation by
the staff of the University Hos-
pital on Thursday evening detail-
ing options for the use of St. Jo-
seph Mercy Hospital, the Regents
have the go ahead for the pur-
chase of the $6 million building.

Also in action Friday. the group
OK'd a new office to consolidate
health care programs between
the University Hospital and the
Medical School. The programs do
not include professional health
students.
In Thursday's public session
'Professor Bill Neenan, represent-
ing the faculty's Committee on
the Economic Status of the Fac-
ulty, asked the eight Regents to
up the salary increase this year
from 5.75 per cent to 12.5 per cent
"to attract and keep scholars of
the first rank" at the University.
Neenan contended that tuition
hikes and state funds are suf-
ficient to keep up with Detroit
area's 7.7 per cent cost of living
jump last year.
Also on Thursday, two
graduate students and a local
,__ _ a- _ - I V "Jct

VA continued
CLA IMING THE CRIMEof
which Leonora Perez and
Filipina Narciso were convicted
are "so inconsistent with what we
know about these women," De-
fense attorneys Edward Stein
and Lawrence Burgess argued
for psychiatric testing of the two
prior to sentencing. Federal dis-
trict Judge Phillip Pratt granted
that request Thursday.
Perez and Narciso, convicted
of poisoning and conspiracy
charges stemming from a mys-
terious rash of breathing failures
in Ann Arbor's Veteran's Admin-
istration Hospital in 1975, are to
undergo psychiatric testing and
observation at Alderson Peniten-
tiary, in West Virginia.
Sentencing will follow the dis-
closure of results of the testing.
The two nurses could face life
sentences.
Potpourri
N OTHER ACTION this week,
the Sixth U.S. Circuit Court

AP Photo
son interested in its outcome."
INCUMBENT COLEMAN
Young, and Detroit Councilman
Ernest Browne were the top two
finishers in the Detroit mayoral
primary Tuesday, and 'will face'
each other in the final election in
November. Young was first in the
balloting, with Browne finishing
second. Third went to Thomas
Daily" and John Mogk finished
fourth.
* * *
TORRENTIAL RAINS hit Kan-
sas City, Mo. Tuesday leaving in
their wake 23 persons dead, hun-
dreds homeless, and millions:of
dollars worth of damage. Offic-
ials said the damage in some
areas was "total destruction."5
* * *
WHILE BERT LANCE wis
busy trying to dig himself out of a
hole, Press Secretary Jody Pow-
ell decided to start a hole of his
own. Tuesday, Powell telephoned
Loye Miller of the Chicago Sun-
Times Washington Bureau, and
suggested Miller investigate the

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