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September 16, 1977 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Friday, September 16, 1977-Page 5
First Regents meeting a busy one

(Continued from Page )
TWO GRADUATE Employees
Organization (GEO) members and a
Apcal labor leader sat at the long, shiny
table with the Regents and requested
that the University drop its appeal to
an August 19 ruling which found the
;,administration guily of an unfair labor
practice.
GEO filed an unfair labor charge last
"iJNovember, when the University,
ak refused to sign a labor contract until
Awo grievances remaining from a prior
-ontract were resolved.
The University said it will appeal the
ruling in order to test the claim by GEO
a .:

that teaching assistants are University
employes.
"The administration is out to bust
this union," stated Fred Veigel of the
Huron Valley Labor Council. Veigel
told the Regents that he would expect
"a great school of higher learning to
accept this judge's opinion without
going the final mile to prove their
point."
AFTER THE meeting Regent Gerald
Dunn (D-Livonia) said: "I'm ready to
accept the decisionof the courts."
"A question that cries out to be an-

swered," according to South African
Liberation Committee member Randy
Schwartz,. is that of University
stockholdings in businesses that make
money in South Africa.
Schwartz said that financial success
in South Africa depends on "slavery,"
and that such a condition adds up to
"moral bankruptcy."
DENNIS ONDEJE, vice-president of
the African Students Association,
reported that the visit of University of
South Africa Prof. Lourens Pretorius to
campus has been "shrouded' in
mystery.".

Ondeje said that he met with
Pretorius yesterday and found the
professor "happens to be a conscien-
sous speaker," but Ondeje objects to
what he termed as secrecy surrounding
the visit.
After the session, Regent James
Waters (D-Muskegon) spoke with On-
deje-and said the Pretorius controversy
"shouldn't happen."
At 9:00 this morning the Regents
finish the September business with
votes on an allied health program, a
formal O.K. for the Office of Affir-
mative Action, and the authorization
for the purchase of St. Joseph Hospital.

A

2

d b a .Cb d l W ,W d

1 L'Y.We 11
;egents with violatio
of Meetings Act

(Continued from Page 1'
someone's privacy would be invad-
ed."
HOOD INTENDS to argue that
Section 13 is unconstitutional and'
:would like to see it deelared as such

B
Abe
cas
str
op]

"I'm sure that it wasn't written to
r estrict another act, but that's what
ft's doing," he said.
Even if the provisions of the
'"treedom of Information Act are
stricken, though, some closed ses-
sions will still be allowed under the
Open Meetings Act. The act allows a
session to be closed for a number of
very specific reasons, including dis-
cussions of real estate transactions,
disciplinary action against an em-
ploye, and collective bargaining 1
strategy.'t
sTHE NEWS CHOSE to sue the Re- I
gents, because, as News Editor Herb
pendlove put it, "They are one of the
most honorable bodies in the state,
and people are using them as a
model."
COMPUTER FINDS
KISS STIRRING
WASHINGTON (AP) - A kiss is I
.one of the latest methods developed I
Mfer turning on a computert A Japan-
*se company has produced a com
puter that only registers lip prints,
I reports National Geographic. The
--6omputer won't work until the opera-
t!or presses his lips against it and only
if the kiss stirs something in its
d'inemory banks a 1.
"" Most eomputer'are nmore easily
+Eerned on, and th ielwdtr ani marvels
have aided and abetted fraud, theft,
embezzlement and military and in-
,dustrial espionage, Geographic L
enotes.

Both lawyers expressed optimisi
out the strength of their respectiv
ses. "It's just a question of tw
ong bodies with a difference o
inion," said Hood.
- CLIP ANDSAVE . - -
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Phone Numbers
Circulation
764-0558
Classified Adv.
764-0557

Display Adv.
764-0554
News
764-0552
4ports
7 64-0562

. " ;

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Beit Midrash
Hebrew for Beginners
Mon. & Thurs. 7:00-8:30 p.m.
Intermediate Hebrew,
Tuesdays 7:00-8:30 p.m.
Hebrew Speaking Club
Thursdays 7:00-8:30.
Hebrew Poetry & Short Story
Mondays 8:30-10:00 p.m.
Torah and Haftarah Chant
Tuesdays 7:00-8:30 p.m.
History of Jewish Art
Wednesdays 7:00-8:00 p.m.
Jewish Skills and Crafts
Wednesdays 8:00-9:30 p.m.
Basic Judaism
Mondays 7:00-10:00 p.m.
Shabbat: Origins, Obligations, & Orientations
Mondays 7;008:30,p.m.
Chumash and Rashi
Mondays 8:30-10:00 p.m.
Talmud Baba Metzia
Wednesdays 8:30-10;00 p.m.
A Jewish Catalogue
Mondays 9:00-10:00 p.m.
World Jewry: Issues and Problems
Time to be arranged
The Rise of the State of Israel
Wednesdays 7:00-8:30 p.m.
registration for the Fail Term will take place Thursday, September 15, 7-9
p.m., and Sunday, September 18, 11-3 p.m. at the Hillel Foundation, or by
mail.

SAVE! HUNDREDS OF AUDIO COMPONENTS ARE
SPECIALLY LOW PRICED. 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
THESE ARE JUST A FEW OF THE MANY "SATURDAY ONLY" BARGAINS:

~ sdml

I z

MARANTZ MODEL 12M
SPEAKER LOW PRICED
Famous Marantz performance at
a Saturday Only low pricel Wood-
grain vinyl finish enclosure with
deep sculptured foam grille.

SANYO RD-4135 STEREO
CASSETTE RECORD DECK
Features include twin VU-meters,
fast forward and pause control.
Digital tape counter. Tape equalizer
switch. Automatic end-tape stop.
X49

g26

EA.

SANSUI BELT-DRIVE
SR-222 TURNTABLE
Features include Tripod motor
mount, S-shaped tonearm and
4-pule synchronous motor. With
base and hinged dust cover.
$59
TEAC A-100 DOLBY
FRONT-LOAD DECK
Stereo cassette record/playback
deck has DC motor. Bias & equal-
izer switches. Dolby Noise Reduc-
dwn System VU-meters. Satutdayt
$ 1,,T

JBL 35-WATT L26
2-WAY SPEAKER BUY
Big 10-inch woofer and 1.4-inch
tweeter. Corhpact decorator styled
enclosure is finished in natural
Oak. 24 inches in height.

$119

EA.

PIONEER SA-7500-lI
INTEGRATED AMPLIFIER
Continuous power output 45 watts/
channel, min. RMS at 8 ohms from
20 to 20,000 Hz with no more than.
0.1% total harmonic distortion.

MARANTZ 6300 DIRECT
DRIVE TURNTABLE
Servo-controlled direct-drive
platter. Tonearm has gimba
bearings. Auto. shut-off. Hand
some base & dust cover included
'175
PIONEER SX-750 AM/FR
50-WATT RECEIVER
Continuous power output 50 want/
channel,t min. RMS at 8 ohms frau,
20 to 20,000 Hz with no more thar
0.1% total harmonic distortion.

Yi' 1iYYlY11 YiYWYIYY YW Y WWW-J

CENTREX TN-30 PLAY- PIONEER SX-450 AM/FM
BACK DECK BY PIONEER 15-WATT RECEIVER

Auto or manual program change.
Vertical headshift mechanism for
positive tape to head contact.
Lighted channel indicators.

Continuous power output 15 waWb/
channel, min. RMS at8 ohms bram
20 to 20,000 H. No more than
0.5% toaltihronic datortio.
'118

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