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January 14, 1978 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-01-14

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Page 8-Saturday, January 14, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Sadat mulls Palestinian self-rule

Gov. hopeful Fitzgerald

(Continued from Page 1)
discussions.
He brought back with him Egyptian
counterproposals to an Israeli plan for
withdrawl from the Sinai, which Israel
seized from Egypt in the 1967 Mideast
wasr, and for future security
arrangements there.
Asked whether Egypt's ideas were
acceptable, Weizman replied: "No,
no... But there are a few things that
are more than a possibility."
HE SAID the Cairo meetings had
been "amicable" but that the only
progress he could report was on the
issue of establishing zones in the Sinai.
Thex two sides had come closer
together on "the principle of a concep-
tion that sees the Sinai divided into
three areas-probably a United Nations
zone or a buffer zone, a demilitarized
zone and a zone where the Egyptian
army will go back to," Weizman said.
he did not elaborate.
The biggest stumbling block to
agreement on the Sinai appears to be

the existence of 20 Jewish settlements
there. Begin has insisted that they
remain under Israeli control, and Sadat
has demanded that all Israelis pull out
of the Sinai.
THE SADAT interview in the
English-language Jerusalem Post was
his first with an Israeli newspaper. It
took place earlier this week in Aswan,
Egypt.
Sadat said Begin was "returning to
the language of threats" when he said
last Sunday he might rescind his offer
to return the Sinai to Egypt if Jewish
settlements are not allowed to remain
there.
"We're heading toward the old
problem: is it peace or land?" Sadat
was quoted as saying. "This is the
question that needs an answer from
your side. Until now you've been after
land."
The Post reported Sadat said he could
accept as a transitional measure
Begin's proposals for limited self-rule

for the Palestinians of the Israeli-
occupied West Bank of the Jordan
River and the Gaza Strip, provided
Israel pledges in advance that the
Paslestinians would ultimately have
self-determination.
Begin's plan calls for a review of the
situation after five years and leaves
open the question of sovereignty over
the territories. But he has consistently
rejected the idea of an independent:
Palestinian state.
His plan also calls for a continued
Israeli military presence in the
territories. The Post said Sadat in the
interview reaffirmed his demand for
total Israeli withdrawal from occupied
Arab lands.
The United States had one life
insurance company from 1759 to 1768.
In 1970, there were 1,800, when 355
million policies were in force and
coverage per family averaged
$21,000, says the Census Bureau.

attacksm
(Continued from Page 1)
"People aren't going to put pressure on
me to do the wrong thing."
Fitzgerald also leveled sharp
criticism at Milliken for "mishandling"
the PBB problem. "He really gave the
farmers a kick in the pants," he said.
"We know that the, Public Health
Department and the Agriculture
Department have been a national em-
barrassment to us."
FITZGERALD SAID he would
promote a state budget without the
deficit spending that some state
legislators promote. The state con-
stitution currently forbids deficit spen-
ding, but there are many Democrats
who would like to hold a new con-
stitutional convention to change this and
other clauses.
"We have to have a balanced
budget," Fitzgerald said. "Michigan
does not operate like the federal gover-
nment is allowed to operate."
Fitzgerald does, however, share
Milliken's support for a land use plan-
ning bill now in the Senate Conservation
Committee.

ilMilitken
"We should have some means to
regulate growth and development.
Some mechanism is needed to deter-
mine how we grow . .. so that some
sanity is involved," he said.
THE BILL AND other conservation
bills do face opposition, however. Fitz-
gerald called Sen. Joseph Mack (D-
Ironwood) a "tyrant type" who is
"trying to lock the bills up in commit-
tee."
The bill, which has been a high
priority item for Milliken, would limit

poli1cies2
uncontrolled development in man
state land areas.
"I think it's better not to cut the
higher education budget," Fitzgeral
said, turning towards the issue of
shrinking state appropriations for
colleges. However, he did not advocate
a higher proportion of state funds for
educational purposes, saying: "We are
wasting a lot of money in ad.
iministration. There's not enougl
money that goes into the system foi
direct pupil services."

LONG STRUGGLE

WASHINGTON (AP) - The four-
year battle of the citizens of a small
Icelandic fishing village to save their
homes and livelihood from the rav-
ages of a large volcanic explosion
seems to have paid off.
According to a National Geograph-
ic Magazine report, the 5,000 people
of Vestmannaeyjar on the island of
Heimaey couldn't wait to return to
their village after being driven away
in 1973 by fire, lava and heavy ash

that threatened to clos forever the
mouth of theim harbor and cover their
homes.
At one point, firemen sprayed cold
seawater on the encroaching lava
flow in an effort to create a dam that
would divert the molten rock. Now,
with the village mostly cleaned of
ash, the fishermen find themselves
with an improved harbor and a po-
tential source of heating energy from
the lava deposits.

Applications are now being accepted for
CENTRAL STUDENT
JUDICIARY
(The student supreme court)
Apply at MSA Office-3909 Michigan Union
DEADLINE: January 16, 1978

INCARCERATED IN CHINA:

Prof. recalls prison life

tj

"WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"

Psalms 2:1 a
"AND LET US NOT BE WEARY IN WELL DOING: FOR IN
DUE SEASON WE SHALL REAP, IF WE FAINT NOT."
Galatlans 6:9. The writer is thinking of quite a number of
correspondents who have written telling of evil and corrup-
tion they know of in high and low places, of things all decent
and God Fearing men and women should be ashamed. in the
9th chapter of the Book of Ezekiel, God orders a mark put
upon all those crying and troubled concerning society's
corruptions and abominations. This mark was to protect
them from the man with the "slaughter weapon" sent forth by
The Almighty for judgement and vengeance. "Woe unto
them that call evil good." Many consider fine and o.k. things
the Bible calls abominations in the sight of God. Said Jesus
Christ in Luke 16:15: "FOR THAT WHICH IS HIGHLY
ESTEEMED IN THE SIGHT OF MEN IS ABOMINATION IN
THE SIGHT OF GOD." Are you familiar with the context of
the Scripture in which this statement was made? It was
followed with Christ's "Record of a certain rich man" in the
fires of hell, who in his effort to get his brethren warned was
told: "They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them
- - If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will
they be persuaded, though one rose from the dead." The tes-
timony of this Column, whether any hear or forbear to hear,
is t be aware of all those who set the New Testament against
The Old Testamentl One of the early Christian martyrs,

and Acts 4:25
Polycarp, said such were the "first born of the devil!"
To those sincere in their witness against the evils all about,
and know Judgement and Wrath Is ahead unless we repent
and turn away from evil, would suggest you read and
meditate upon the 9th chapter of Nehemiah, and again the
9th chapter of Daniel. in these chapters the Congregation of
Israel, and later Daniel, appear to repent and apologize to
God for the great sin of the people as well as their own, and
seek pardon and forgiveness, though undeserved.
The first recorded words of Christ after His baptism were
approval of "every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of
God," which means all Scripture - read Matthew and Luke
4:4. And later Christ said: "Ye do err, not knowing the Scrip-
tures, and the power of God!" So we say at the close of this
paragraph, as at the beginning: "AND LET 4S NOT BE
WEARY IN WELL DOING: FOR IN DUE SEASON WE WILL
REAP, IF WE FAINT NOT!" We do well to worry and warn of
evil and disobedience to God's Commandments! In fact we
do unwell and are in danger if we fail to give God's warning
2nd Chronicles 7:14: "IF MY PEOPLE, WHICH ARE
CALLED BY MY NAME, SHALL HUMBLE THEMSELVES,
AND PRAY, AND SEEK MY FACE, AND TURN FROM THEIR
WICKED WAYS: THEN WILL I HEAR FROM HEAVEN, AND
WILL FORGIVE THEIR SIN,, AND WILL HEAL THEIR
LAND."

(Continued from Page 1)
"When I was on my way to China, the
Naval Intelligence asked me to keep
my eyes open," Rickett said, adding
that he provided a small amount of
economic and political information to
the American consulate.
"It's the kind of thing you can get
away with in peace, but if war breaks
out, you're in trouble," he commented.
SHORTLY AFTER his arrest,
Rickett was interrogated for 12 days.
During thatstime, he said, he found him-
self "admitting things I swore I never
would and denying things I had already
admitted."
"The investigating judge pointed out
to me that it cost quite a bit to feed you
but only five cents to shoot you,"
Rickett recalled.
Rickett also discussed the Commu-
nist government's cultural programs
after the revolution. For the most part,
he said, he new system works very well.
"I THINK the thing that impresses
Americans more than anything else is
Dr. Paul C. Uslan
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the purposefulness of the Chinese peo-
ple," Rickett, said. However, he
cautioned that every institution created
by human beings can be misused.
Rickett said the Chinese were able to.
make massive social changes largely
through their use of propaganda.
"The whole question of shaping
thought \tends to repel us
(Americans)," he said. "The Chinese
never had the emphasis on individual
rights as in the U.S.A.",
"CHINA'S MAIN problem (after the
revolution) was changing the habits
and customs of tens of millions of peo-

ple."
This was accomplished, he said, by
organizing people into discussion
groups, and through plays.
"It's a system very similar to group
therapy in this country," he said, but
added that "there is no other group in
history who have tried to do this to an
entire population."
"For me the whole process of reform
was extremely difficult," Rickett said.
"The crucial question was what I would
do when I got out ... The door to a prison
cell becomes the important thing in a
prisoner's life."

Gunman 's attempt to
shoot Gandhi fails,

NEW DELHI, India (AP)-A man
pointed a loaded gun at former Prime
Minister Indira Gandhi yesterday but
was overpowered and did not shoot,
police said.
Witnesses said a man identified later
as Murari Lal Batra, 56, moved through
a heavy crowd and placed the muzzle of
an Italian revolver at the window of a
car carrying Mrs. Gandhi, 60, in the

P. O. BOX 405, DECATUR, GA. 30031

HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF APPLICATION FORMS
FOR 1978-79 ACADEMIC YEAR
Available Starting January 16, 1978
In Ms. Charlene Coady's Office, 1500 SAB
POSITIONS INCLUDE: Head Resident, Resident Director,
Assistant Resident Director, Resident
Advisor, Head Librarian, Resident
Fellow, CULS Counselor and Graduate
Student Teaching Assistant
Advisory ,positions require the completion of a minimum of 55 credit hours by
the end of the 1978 Winter term for the Resident Fellows in Residential College,
Resident Advisor and CULS Counselor positions: Graduate status for Graduate
Student Teaching Assistant in Pilot Program, Head Librarian, Head Resident
and Resident Director positions. However, qualified undergraduate applicants
may be considered for the Resident Director positions.
QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a registered U. of M. student on the-Ann Arbor Campus during
the period of employment. (2) Must have completed a minimum of 55 credit hours by the end
of the 1978 Winter term. (3) Preference will be given to applicants who have lived in residence
halls at University level for at least one year. (4) Undergraduate applicants must have a 2.5
cumulative grade point average and graduate applicants must be in good academic standing
at the end of the 1977 Fall term in the school or college in which they are enrolled. (5) Prefer-
ence is given to applicants who do not intend to carry heavy academic schedules and who do
not have rigorous outside commitments. (6) Applicants with children will not be considered.

streets of Old Delhi, where she had gone
to a public birthday celebration for a
religious leader, Swami Vivekananda.
A BYSTANDER and a policeman
grabbed Batra's asrm and together
they took him to a police car.
Soon afterward Mrs. Gandhi entered
the town hall auditorium and spoke for
40 minutes, making no reference to the
incident. Later she talked-with some of
the crowd about what had happened.
Batra, an electro-plating worker, was
taken to a police station and questioned
on suspicion of attempted murder and
violation of arms control laws, police
said.
He was said to have lived in a neigh-
borhood destroyed during a controver-
sial slum clearance program under the
Gandhi administration.
A political worker with Mrs. Gandhi
in her said he saw an armed man ap-
proach the car and raise his arm to her
window.
"The gun hit the glass and I shouted,
'It's a revolver!' " J. K. Jain, of Mrs.
Gandhi's branch of the split and recen-
tly dethroned Congress Party, told a
reporter. He said Mrs. Gandhi was not
disturbed by the incident.
Mrs. Gandhi governed India for 11
years and resigned after her Congress
Party was defeated last March by
Morarji Desai's Janata Party. Her ad-
ministration has been accused of
numerous abuses during her 19-month
"emergency"that ended shortly before
her defeat.

r

MEETiNGS FOR PROSPECTIVE
STAFF MEMBERS

FC PW
srq Fi
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Tuesday, Jan. 17-8 p.m.
East Quad, Greene Lounge
Bursley, West Lounge

Wed., Jan. 18-8 p.m.
South Quad, West Lounge ThUr., Jan. 19-S p.m.
Markley, Angela Davis Lounge Daily offices
420 Maynard (upstairs)

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