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April 14, 1978 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ATTENTIO N!
The Women's Studies Program
1058 L.S.A. Bldg., 763-2047
ANNOUNCES:
A ,NEW COURSE OMITTED FROM THE TIME SCHEDULE

Page 2-Friday, April 14, 1978-The Michigan Daily
ACTION COMES IN WAKE OF BURSLEY POT PARTY:

Housing to examine dorm govts.

FALL 1978
340 003

Instructor: Katie Stewart
WOfwME N IN

AMERICAN FAMILIES
(meets Tues & Thurs 3:00-4:00 p.m.)
OTHER FALL COURSES:

240
340
340
350
360

Introduction to Women's Studies
(001) Women's Autobiographies
(002) Psychology of Women
Women and the Community
Woman's Identity

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There's still time to
boogie down before
booking down
END OF SEMESTER DISCO

By RICHARD BERKE
and BRIAN BLANCHARD
In' the wake of a marijuana-buying
incident at Bursley, Acting University
Housing Director Robert Hughes says
he plans to form a student-staff com-
mittee to examine the structure of
dormitory governments.
However, Hughes said the idea of
forming such a committee has been "on
the back of my mind" for years and was
not spurred by the Bursley incident.
ON THE LAST day in March, $200
worth of marijuana was handed out
during a party on the fourth floor of
Bursley's Van Hoosen wing. The money
had been approved two days earlier by
six of the eight members on the student
Bursley Board of Governors. Within a
week after the party, Hughes ter-
minated the leases of the six Board
members on the recommendation of
Bursley Building Director Tod Hanson.
Hughes pointed out that dorm gover-
nment funds used to be subject to more
oversight by the Housing Office. He
said he is currently not planning to put
tighter reins on dorm governments, but
did not discount that possibility.
"We use leases to enforce payment of
(dorm) dues, but certainly can't use it
to prevent the purchase of marijuana,"
he said. "If we have further problems
with dorm funds used for illegal pur-
poses, there's no question that we'll
scrutinize the use of money." The
structure of governments vary widely
from dorm to dorm:
" Alice Lloyd: The Alice Lloyd Dorm
SUBJECTS WANTED:
Earn $3 in one hour. Participate in
interesting research on human
memory.
Call Kim, 763-4044,
bet. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Get ready for
SUMMER and the
MIXED LEAGUE
BOWLING
Wednesday night
50¢ per game.
SIGN UP at the
Union Lanes

Government is composed of a represen-
tative o each corridor. It is funded
through dorm dues and vending
machines, The money goes to parties,
speakers, films, and other activities.
Mary Markley: The Markley Coun-
cil consists of one representative from
each of the dorm's nine houses, in ad-
dition to residents who have attended
three consecutive meetings. Most of the
Council's funds, which gn to parties and
other activities, come from pinball
machines.
SMosher-Jordan: The House Council
has one representative from each of the
dorm's 19 corridors. Money comes from
dorm dues and vending and pinball
machines. The Council funds a snack
bar, but does not make any profits from
it.
" South Quad: South Quad Council of-
ficers are elected at-large by dorm
members, with each of the dorm's eight
houses represented by one person. Most
of the Council funds come from pinball
machines. The Council sponsors
movies, parties, and other activities.
" Bursley: An eight-member Board
of Governors is elected each year by
Bursley residents. The group decides
how to allocate money from Bursley
Enterprises, a student fund supported
by the dorm store, pinball machines,
and vending machines. Most of the
money is spent on parties.
* Couzens: The House Council meets
once a week to vote on uses of money
gathered from dorm dues of $15 per
year. There are 20 members on the
Council, two from each of the ten
corridors at Couzens.
" East Quad:' The Representative
Assembly consists of dorm residents as
well as Residential College (RC)
students and representatives from In-
teflex and the minority community.

tuition aid
(Continued from Page 1)
However, sophomore Rosemary
Callahan said, "I really needed money
for fall, because I was unable to pay my
tuition. It was an emergency and they
gave me the loan the same day." She
added that she returned to the office the
following day and the loan was ready
ahead of time.
"All my friends are on it (aid
program) and they don't need it,
there's too much of it already," coun-
tered another sophomore, Rick Sutton.
OTHER STUDENTS voiced concern
over the fact that tuition tax credits go
to their parents even if the student is
financially independent. "They should
expand the grant program rather than
tax cr dits, I don't pay taxes and I don't
think many students do," said senior
Graham Teall. "It wouldn't help me -
I'm self sufficient," said another
student.
Many students are satisfied with the
existing programs, and they noted that
some of the forms have been simplified.
"They've been improved significantly
with better communication and

Student reaction to

Representatives are elected by each of
the 16 corridors. The Assembly is fun-
ded through resident dues, but receives
money from the Michigan Student
Assembly and vending machines. Par-
ties, the RC players (a drama group),
the dorm newspapers, and dorm
library all receive funds from the
Assembly. In addition to represen-
tatives, the Assembly has three paid
administrative workers.

" West Quad: The West Quad Council
is made up of two representatives from
each of the dorm's six houses in ad-.
dition to two representatives from each
of the dorm's six houses in addition to
two representatives from Betsy Bar-
bour and Helen Newberry Residences.
The Council is funded through pinball
machines, and voluntary house con-
tributions. The Council sponsors par-
ties, dance lessons, and other activities.

SATURDAY, April15
9:00 PM at H I LLEL
1429 Hill St.

f1ALi
~ ad

procedures," affirmed one graduate
student.
"The important thing is they're
trying," said graduate student Chuck
Randall. "It's a pretty good system
now," said another student filing for
aid.
STUDENT ADVOCATES of tax
credits plan to promote them on the
premise that all college students need
aid, not just low-income students. "The
government should support higher
education for children, it's not their
fault that their parents make the in-
come they do," asserted another
student.
Grotrian, along with other critics,
maintains that the tax credit plan
would require{"more bureaucratic ef-
fort necessary than through existing
programs." He said steps would have to
be taken to verify information oh
eligible full-time students.
Some students support the credits
because income level does not indicate
the educational expenses of having
several students in college at once. "A
high income family with lots of children
spend lots of money on education,"
pointed out one student. "If it's going to
help everyone then it's better than
helping no one at all," another student
noted. She added: "Why punish those
who do have the money?"
Grotrian said the chances of program
expansion being funded are reasonably
good. Hopefully, Grotrian says, the
Department of Health, Education and
Welfare will provide an additional $4
for each student loan, and $10 extra for
procession each Basic Educational Op-
portunity Grant (BEOG). Presently it
costs students $4 when they file a BEOG
application. This will add an additional
$40,000 toward the cost of processing.
--
FBI man:
Carter

ADMISSION:
$1
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NATIONAL GAY BLUE JEANS DAY
FRIDAY, APRIL 14th
This day has been set aside on college campuses across the country to
promote solidarity among gay people and to demonstrate that we will not
have our human rights denied.
0 Gay solidarity by wearing blue jeans.

Music by
WRCN

Demonstrate:

" Support for lesbians and gay men by wearing
blue jeans.
*' Homophobia by not wearing blue jeans

Supported by
Offices.

LSA-SG, Gay Liberation Front, Gay Advocates

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H. ROTHE
RECENT PRINTS

APRIL 8-APRIL 29

probes
(Continued from Pare1)
namese.
ADAMSON SAID the attorney
general, who was out of Washington at
the time, had authorized him to say that
LaPrade's charges "have no bearing
whatsoever on the charges pending
against him (LaPrade)."
LaPrade has been under recent
pressure by Bell for his alleged ac-
tivities in illegal acts committed in in-
vestigations of the Weatherman Under-
ground.
Adamson and other Justice Depar-
tment spokesmen noted that Bell, Levi
and former FBI director Clarence
Kelley have testified to various com-:
mittees of Congress concerning
wiretaps and other warrantless sur-
veillance in national security cases.
Adamson insisted that "none of this is
new." Warrantless surveillance, he
stressed, "is only directed in foreign in-
telligence and counter-intelligence in
vestigations against agents of foreign
powers."

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GALLERY
303 S. STATE 668-7652

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