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April 11, 1978 - Image 12

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-11

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Page 12-Tuesday, April 11,1978--The Michigan Daily
Protection o abortion rights urged at workshop

By PAULINE TOOLE
Five women's rights activists
thered in East Quad Sunday to con-
et a series of workshops on tactics to
otect abortion rights.
The session, "Woman's Body,
oman's Right," sponsored by the
oman's Mobilization Collective,
atured Lee Kefauver of the Feminist
ureau of Investigation and Women's
:uity Action League.
ALSO SPEAKING were Katherine

Tennyson, the Detroit organizer for the
1972 Michigan Abortion Referendum;
Pam Creighton, legislative aide to State
Senator William Fitzgerald; Debra
Lipson, and Patricia Widmayer, direc-.
tor of legislation for the Michigan State
Board of Education.
After a review of the history of recent
abortion legislation, the panelists
outlined strategies to counter the
deluge of anti-abortion legislation on all
levels of government. ,
Tactics proposed included

monitoring the state legislature,
pressuring individual legislators to
take a public stance on abortion,
organizing the pro-abortion forces to
make them more visible and
monitoring the opposition.
"THE ANTI-ABORTIOIG forces are
powerful and strong. The organized
around the issue and now they are an
effective lobbying source," Tennyson
said.
"Women worked so hard on other
things after the 1973 Supreme Court
decision that they lost sight of the abor-
tion issue," she added.
The panelists agreed that inattentive-
ness proved to be a mistake for pro-
abortionists. Last summer, Congress
passed a Medicaid Appropriations Bill
which ended the use of federal funds for
SUBJECTS WANTED:
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abortions. A Legal Aid Bill, also passed
last summer, prohibited legal aid
lawyers from defending abortion
related cases.
THOSE BILLS AND the flurry of
other anti-abortion legislation have
drawn feminists back to the abortion
issue indroves.
The panelists all worked for passage
of the 1972 Michigan Abortion Referen-
dum and have since channeled their
energies elsewhere - concentrated on
other issues. They unanimously urged
the predominantly female audience to
use the electoral system to counter anti-
abortion forces.
Referring to the upcoming fall elec-
tions, Creighton said, "One of the most
effective ways you have to change
things is the ballot box. There are eight
openings in the Michigan Senate -
start there, this is an important year."
KEFAUVER HAS received much
criticism from Michigan legislators.
She ways she also inspires fear. The
Massachusetts native is largely
responsible for compiling and

distributing a list of the "Ten Most .
Wanted Men" - legislators who vote
poorly on women's issues. She has also
collected the voting records of all
Michigan legislators and is distributing
the lists to women across the state.
"WHEN A women's issue is defined,
there is a women's vote," she insisted.
"They're scared to death of the black
vote - that's twenty per cent of the
vote. We're 53 per cent of the vote. We
could be a threat."
Kefauver and the other panelists
stressed the necessity of "knowing the
opposition." She divided the anti-abor-
tionists into three camps: the right
wing radicals, which includes the John
Birch Society, the Ku Klux Klan and
parts of the Communist Party; the
Moderates, and the Liberals.
Kefauver called the stand the abor-
tion opponents took on Medicaid Abor-
tions a "Dumb move." "That
legislation works to mobilize poor
women who are being denied the right
to abortions. Those women are hard to
mobilize. Also, liberals are beginning to
mobilize around the issue. It was a

stupid move."
THE PANELISTS urged the women
to lobby their legislators and to take the
initiative instead of just trying to coun-
ter the. anti-abortionists. "Forget
defensive tactics - they take too much
time and effort," Kefauver said. "If
you want to get something done, don't
be defensive."
The panelists stressed the need for
women to become involved in the elec-
toral process as more than the
traditional campaign staffers.
"We can't wait for women to run,"
Widmayer said. "Pick a man who's a
feminist and get to work. Otherwise we
lose. Now we lose everydiay."
"Michigan is clean," Kefauver
remarked in closing. "There is no anti-
abortion legislation except the con-
science laws of 1973. We've worked
hard. We need to keep it clean."
From 1957 to 1977 the average
weight of guards in the Big Eight
Conference jumped 38 pounds from
196 pounds to 234.

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# 39

Trowbridge
to run for
Senate seat
(Continued from Page 1)
the pictures."
Council observers have grown ac-
customed to Trowbridge's weekly wit-
ticisms, his sarcastic humor, and his
sweeping historical and literary
parallels that are the mark of his other
profession -,professor of English
literature at Eastern Michigan Univer-
sity.
He compared former Mayor Albert
Wheeler's proposal for a new Model
Cities Dental Clinic to the Pharoah of
Egypt proposing the Pyramids,
Napoleon building the Arc d' Triumph
and Ronald McDonald constructing the
golden arches.
Yesterday, Trowbridge announced
his candidacy for the 18th district seat
being vacated by retiring State Senator
Gilbert Bursley, and became the only
announced Republican in the race so
far.
"IT IS MASOCHISTIC to run for of-
fice," Trowbridge said. "I campaign as
a masochist. In my first campaign (for
Council) I walked 4,700 homes for forty
days."
What's more, Trowbridge thinks his
tenure as Fourth Ward representative
has aptly prepared him for a seat in
Lansing. "I do have experience now
with municipal and state government,"
he said. "Just by being on Council I
have to deal with stae laws every
week."
Trowbridge is hardly the classic
Republican, and looks even less the
part of part-time politico. "Now that's
strange - a Republican English
professor," he said, readily lampooning
himself. He explains his own political
leanings as "libertarian."
"TO ME, REPUBLICAN means one
thing," he said. "I am for less govern-
ment rather than more. I like to have
local people do as much as they can."
Trowbridge takes his politics of
limited government with him, from his
advocacy of more lenent marijuana
laws to his stand on unemployment
compensation.
"I'm a libertarian. What I don't like
is a lot of laws saying we're going to
protect you from yourselves."
ON UNEMPLOYMENT compen-
sation, he says, "I object very much to
compensation going to people who
voluntarily quit their jobs. I don't think
it's fair."
Trowbridge admits his laissez-faire
philosophy does not square with his
voting in favor of Ann Arbor's newly'
enacted pornography bill. "That's one
of the few times I have been absolutely
inconsistent," he said, but he justified
his vote by explaining that the Ann Ar-
bor law protects children from por-
nography while not regulating adults.
"I don't care about regulating what
adults read," he said. "But I do care
about children.
"That's why I don't like (consumer
advocate Ralph) Nader," he said,
returning to his familiar plea for
government to let us alone. "Next thing
yoq know, he's going to try to take away
my peanut butter.
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