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April 11, 1978 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-11

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I

F tu SEE N&S A EM CAL AL-cYX
Canine candidate
Rufus T. Hunsberger is unquestionably the underdog in this
week's Michigan Student Assembly, mainly because Rufus is, in fact,
a dog. Rufus is officially a candidate for an MSA Rackham seat, and
he belongs to Engineering student Todd Hunsberger. According to G.
J. DiGiuseppe, MSA election director, although there is no "Rufus"
Hunsberger registered as a student, the canine candidate is on the
ballot because "T." Hunsberger is eligible. Junior Craig Horn who
was behind the plot said "It's not like a prank. It's just sort of a tongue-
in-cheek comment on student government at the University of
Michigan." According to DiGiuseppe, if Rufus wins the election, the
seat will go to his owner, Todd. Both Todd and Rufus T. Hunsberger
are in Chicago and could not be reached for comment.
Happenings ..
sleep in late today, because nothing is happening before noon,
when the Ann Arbor Committee for Human Rights in Latin America
golds'its weekly brown bag lunch. Meet in Suite 1 on the third floor of
the Michigan League ... if you can wolf down lunch fast enough, you
can make Prof. Edward Stasheff's talk on "Monodrama - Dramatic
Soliloquies from Major and Minor Poets", 12:15 at the Main Ann Arbor
Public Library .. at noon, Music at Mid Day presents Jeanine Leslie
singing French and Russian songs in the Union's Pendleton
Room... at 4 p.m. you're going to have a difficult choice to make.
You can either attend University of Chicago Prof. Bill Beckner's con-
troversial lecture on "Logarithmic Sobolev Inequalities' in room 3201,
Angell Hall . . . or you can hear Peter Schriener discuss "Speech
Processing Aid for Persons with Profound Sensorineural Hearing
Loss", room 5804 Med Sci II .. if neither one of those interest you,
Henry Regier of the University of Toronto talks about "Toward
Restoration and the Rehabilitation of the Great Lakes" .. . or you can
drink tea with LSA Dean Billy Frye at 110 S. University. The Center
for Afro-American and African Studies along with the Student Coun-
seling Office are sponsoring toe Dean's Tea . . a special symposium
on "Aging in Japan" starts at :30 in the Rackham Amphitheatre. The
symposium is designed for professionals working with elderly
Americans in program planning, policy, and direct services . . .
Students for Israel meet at 7:30 in the UGLI Multipurpose Room ...
Asian American writers Frank Chin and Lawson Inada will read some
of their works and other major Asian American authors works, 7:30 at
the Trotter House. A discussion will follow . . . Gordon Clarke will
speak to the Christian Science Organization about "The Touch of
Spirit". The talk starts at 8 p.m. in the Michigan Union's Kuenzel
Room ... Jodi Braxton will read selections of her poetry at 8 p.m.,
Charing Cross Book Shop.
Center seeks volunteers
The Washtenaw County Community Mental Health Center has an-
nounced new openings and new training for volunteers in the center's
several services, including the Assault Crisis Center, or working with
retarded adults with emotional or other personal problems. Volun-
teers work once a week, and must make a time pledge fromt six months
to a year. You must be 21. Training starts May 13.
On the outside ...
After yesterday's temperatures, we hate to print today's forecast.
As you read this paper, the mercury should be falling. The warmest
part of the day will be in the morning. Rain should continue with tem-
peratures in the upper 50s. By late afternoon the thermometer will be
around 50 and the rain should taper off. There is even a slight chance
of sunshine. Tonight will be partly cloudy and much cooler, with a low
from 35 to 38. Tomorrow should be partly sunny with a high in the mid
50s.
Daily Official Bulletin

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday; April 11, 1978-Page 3
Tribal base severs S. African
ties to advocate 'majority rule'

I,

UMTA TA, Transkei, South Africa
(AP) - Transkei, South Africa's first
independent tribal homeland, said
yesterday it was breaking diplomatic
relations with the nation that created it
and would press a "struggle for
liberation" toward black rule in white-
govered South Africa.
Transkei's independence is
recognized only by South Africa, whose
policy of racial separation calls for con-
signing its 19 million blacks to nine
scattered homelands. Opponents of
apartheid say the existence of Transkei
helps perpetuate the dominance of

South Africa by its 4.5 million whites.
Transkei Prime Minister Kaiser
Matanzima, announcing the rupture in
a speech to parliament here, said his
government "can no longer take it.
"WE HAVE BEEN compelled to join
the liberatory movements and claim
the whole of South Africa as belonging
to blacks and whites, with blacks con-
trolling the majority. .. We are going
to propagate majority rule in southern
Africa. From now henceforth this is the
fundamental policy of our struggle for
liberation."

Matanzima said he would recall
Transkei's ambassador and consuls
and eject the South African am-
bassador by April 30.
There was no immediate reacton
from the South African government.
THE OPPOSITION leader in the
South African parliament, Colin Eglin,
said: "It is ironic that the first
homeland to get independence in terms
of the ruling National Party's grand
design should now .have decided to
sever relations with the government."
Matanzima predicted not only a con-
frontation between Transkei and South
Africa but a "bloody struggle" between
black and white South Africans. Other
black states in southern Africa - in-
cluding Tanzania, Zambia, and
Mozambique - harbor nationalist
guerrillas training for combat against
the governments of South Africa and
Rhodesia.
South Africa's "comtemptuous and
brutal" rejection of his government's
claim to East Griqualand; along Tran-

skei's northern border. If incorporated,
the territory would unite Transkei's
main part with a separate chunk
isolated inside South Africa.
OBSERVERS IN South Africa said
more pressing reasons for the break in-
cluded domestic pressure on Matan-
zima to take a hard line against South
Africa and his apparent belief that he
may win some recognition abroad if he
severs relations.
Just after Transkei's independnce
Oct. 26, 1976, the U.N. General Assem-
bly voted 134-0 to declare the "sham in-
dependence" invalid.
Transkei remains economically
dependent on South Africa, which
provides more than half of its 1977-78
national budget of $274 million.
MATANZIMA SAID: "Nobody should
doubt the reaction of white South Africa
to our decision. They will use
everything possible to ostracize and
apply sanctions againsi us. If they
withdraw financial aid from us, it will
be what we expected them to do."

Group proposes new
military pension plan'

WASHINGTON - A presidential
commission yesterday urged an end to
20-year retirements and "double-
dipping" for the next generation of
military personnel.
President Carter received the report
saying he ag;ees there are "serious
defects" in the military retirement
system. He said he would try to send a
bill to Congress by January to correct
them.
The report by the President's Com-
mission on Military Compensation
urged a new system of old-age pensions
and deferred pay to replace the present
military retirement system.
IT ALSO URGED some increases in
military allowances and said the net ef-
fect would be to cut projected
retirement costs by one-third, begin-
ning around the end of the century.
Under the present retirement system
military personnel may draw a pension
of half their basic pay after 20 years
service, beginning immediately and
continuing for life, with inflation ad-
justments. On the- average, officers
retire at age 39.
The cost of this pension system is now
$10 billion a year, and is expected to
grow to $30 billion in the next 20 years,
the commission said. It eats up eight
percent of the entire Pentagon budget.
THE COMMISSION'S proposal also
would prohibit those who retire from
getting federal pension checks while
working in the federal Civil Service, a
practice known as double-dipping.
"The current law can no longer be
justified," commission chairman
Charles Zwick said in a statement to
Carter. "These awesome economic
facts, plus the relatively young people
receiving retirement payments, have
coroded the credibility of military
retirement in the minds of many
Americans."
The commission's recommendation's
would have no effect on persons
already retired, reservists or on those
already in uniform, provided they have
served at least four years. The panel
said the government has an obligation
to continue the present 20-year
retirement system for those who re-
enlisted believing they were working to
ward such a pension.
MEET
TOM WOLFE
at
Cenifcore
336 Maynard
10 a.. Thursday, April13

Under the proposal, those who join
military service in the future, or who
have served less than four years, would
earn credits toward a pension modeled
after the Civil Service system.
It would allow them to retire with an
immediate pension at age 55, after 30
years of service.
Those with 20 years of service could
begin drawing a pension at age 60, in-
stead of immediately on retirement as
under the present system. It would also
allow a pension with as little as 10 years
service, half the present minimum,
although payments would not begin un-
til age 62.
Howard Hawks' Double Feature
BALL OF FIRE
(at 7:00)
GARY COOPER and BARBARA STAN-
WYCK in a hilarious comedy about
an encyclopedist who does slang
research with a nightclub singer.
1941. Saucy & Witty.
ONLY ANGELS
HAVE WINGS
(at 9:05)
CARY GRANT, JEAN ARTHUR and
RITA HAYWORTH fly by night with
adventurous mailpilots in South
Ameica. 1939
CINEMA GUILD
OLD ARCH. AUD.
$2.50 Both $1.50 Each

OFFICE OF FINANCIAL AID NOTICE
The Office of Financial Aid is availabale to provide financial aid, assist with student
budgeting and help locate other resources for students. Students are encouraged to use the
counseling services whether or not they are receiving.direct financial assistance.
TYPES OF AID AVAILABLE:
Undergraduates: Grants, loans, work-study employment
Graduates; Loans, work-study Employment
APPLICATION DUE DATES* -1978-1979

:I

Application Re-
ceived in Office
of Financial Aid
by:
April14, 1978
April14, 1978
April 14, 1978
November 1, 1978

FFS & BEOG**
Processed at ACT
and Received in
Office of Finan-
cial Aid by:
May 20, 1978
June 30, 1978
November 1, 1978
November 1, 1978

Approximate
Notification
Date:
July 30, 1478

Comments:
Maximum consider-
tion

August 31, 1978 Awards subject to
availability of funds.
November 30, 1978 Awards subject to
availability of funds.
Possible considera-
tion for Winter 1979
only.
Mid-December 1978 Awards subject to
availability of funds.
Consideration for
Winter 1979 only.

* All Dates Refer To Date of Receipt in the Office of Financial Aid
** BEOG Required for Undergraduate Applicants Only
OFFICE OF FINANCIAL AID- 2011 SAB
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48100
Phone: 763-2151, 763-2152

OK
7

UJ

Summer Placement
3200 SAB 763-4117
Camp Sequoia, Mi. Will interview Tues., Apr. 111-
1. Openings include waterfront (WSI), arts/crafts,
riding (western), archery, riflery.
Crystal Mountain Lodge, Mi. Will audition at the
Michigan Union, Assembly Hall on Weds., April 12 1
s.m. -1iO p.m. If you play a horn, bass, guitar or sing
- (be part of a combo) register-for audition. Phone
r63-4117 or register in person.
IBM, Vermont. Offers a summer professional
)rogram for students who have completed their
junior year and beyond in elec. engr. or computer
cience. Details and apps. available. Deadlihe April
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVIII, No. 152
Tuesday, April 11, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Actor / Director
DENNIS HOPPER-
In Person
Showing

YMCA - Camp Potowatami, Ind. Opening for trail
leaders. Knowledge in environmental science -
nature - biology, etc. Details available.

p

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READY FOR CRISP?
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HARDONER

STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
Home Cooking is our specialty,
along with our famous Clam Chowder

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Breakfast All Day
3 Eggs, Hash Browns, Toast & Jelly
-$1.55
Ham or Bacon or Sausage with 3

Everyday Specials
Home-made Soup
Home-made Chili
Hamburger Steak Dinner

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