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April 07, 1978 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Batle.
(Continued from Page 1) - s
large number are new to student N
government. P
SABRE IS running a very S
sophisticated campaign, with multi- K
colored, heavy-grade paper posters i
which stand in stark contrast to the
;cheaper offset flyers which usually are N
the trademark of most student gover- n
nment candidates.
THE MAIN CLAIM of SABRE party
literature is that SABRE means a i
fresh, new, responsible MSA. Exam- r
ples 'from their posters: "If SABRE ,
alected, MSA will never be the same.
It'll be productive, useful and respec- ti
ted." Arnson explained that the main n
appeal of the SABRE party is its "good n
people'' If this is enough to win an elec- n
tion remains to be seen.
A second major party is the Move n
Party, an old party with its roots in h
fraternities and sororities. Move is g
running twenty candidates in seven V

begins for
chools. The top Move candidates are movement.
Vancy Smith, who is running for vice running the
resident on an independent ticket with any of the m
ABRE chieftain Arnson, and Scott Perhaps t
Kellman, a former MSA president who parties is th
s running for the Law Schoollseat. is led by a I
Move is running mostly new faces for ving Freen
MSA, having few incumbents after a slogans is
mediocre Move Party showing in the ass!"Bullsh
November election . candidates
MOVE IS NOT clinging to any major schools on
ssues in this campaign, but rather Bullshit Pa
eflecting on the party members' past seated on M
erformance on MSA.
Peoples' Action Coalition (PAC) has ,
the most detailed platform of any of the
major parties. PAC seems to dwell
more on specific outside issues without
much mention of restructuring MSA.
PAC candidates for the most part are
ewcomers to MSA, although many
have experience in other student
governments and in such groups as the
Vietnam Teach-in and anti-apartheid

MSA
PAC so far seems to be
most low-key campaign of
ajor parties.
the most colorful of MSA
e Bullshit Party. The party
ong-time MSA politico, Ir-
nan. One of the party's
'Give MSA a pain in the
ht has recruited some new
in a few of the, smaller
campus, but many of the
arty candidates are now
:SA.

SOME OF THE party's more colorful
campaign. tactics include: a fully
decked-out court jester on the Diag
proclaiming the merits of the party and
a rear view of a cow on Bullshit posters
stating, "we're udderly fantastic'!b"
One of the major issues brought up by
the Bullshit Party is the need for more
minority participation on MSA.
Other smaller parties are running
candidates as well as a number of in-
dependents. They include: The Greeks,
3 candidates; Union 'for Responsive

The Michigan Daily-Friday, April 7, 1978-Page 5
RZe az a Fan
iuSaeid f £ie
a lecture by DR. H GEN BIESAHTZ
Member of the Central Council of the
Anthroposophical Society, The Goetheanum, Switzerland

Saturday,
April 8, 1978
8:00 p.m.

Rudolph Steier
House
1923 Geddes Avenue
Ann Arbor

Government, 2 candidates,
Political Leadership Attuned to
Needs of Students (PLANS), 2
didates. Sixteen independentc
didates are also running.

and
the
can-
can-

I

Tke beciswie
,poll'mcd layJ Itic 'udc~t 'tria1iftifrtfile a (l 'lrd A 'ra

4'

R D

i

U

Daily Photo by BRAD BENJAMIN
Deep in thought, this little girl is discovering the difficulties of the English
tanguage.

Learnin
r (ontinued from' Page 1)9 "
The classes meet Mondays and Wed-
nesdays at the Pound House Children's
Center on East University and Hill and
cost $10.00 per child for each eight week
session.
The primary focus of the program is
to encourage oral learning and also,
through the active participation of
parents, to provide a bridge between,
home and school in 'the childrens' in-
troduction to American society.
PARENTS ARE encouraged to at-
tend classes, support group activities
during class and reinforce the lessons
at home.
"Parental participation has worked
out in some cases," says Ellen Colovos
the program director. "It can be dif-
ficult, though, because many of the
parents don't speak English."
It is also hoped that the program will
stimulate the child's experience of
American customs, etiquette,
literature, songs and games while still
maintaining respect for his or her own
heritage.

En lish fun
"WE APPROACH learning from a
wholistic point of view' states
Yoshida. "We don't give them the A, B,
C's first, but try to incorporate the
whole thing. We're trying to utilize a
more contextual format in the teaching
of language."
Yoshida, who came to the program
about six months ago, wrote the songs
which are central to the class format.
"I published a children's book while in
Japan and have been incorporating my
ideas from the book into songs," he
said.
COLOVOS. POINTS out that a child
learns a language by experiencing it.
"When I hold up a round piece of felt the
children don't always know that it's
supposed to be a head, but when they
touch their own heads they know what it
is."
This type of learning was demon-
strated during the classroom exercises.
"THE CHILDREN really seem to en-
joy coming here and that's the most
important thing," said Yoshida.

SAV!HUNDREDS OF AUDIO COMPONENTS ARE
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THESE ARE JUST A.FEW, OF THE MaNY 'SATURAY. ONLY" BARGAINS:

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