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April 06, 1978 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 10-Thursday, April 6, 1978-The.Michigan Daily

Love Match

Women netters massacre Eastern Michigan

By SCOTT M. LEWIS
Michigan's women's tennis team was
a rude host to Eastern Michigan
yesterday as they annihilated the
Hurons 9-0 in non-conference com-
petition.',
The triumph was Michigan's second
straight of the young season. Last.
weekend the women defeated three Big
Ten foes in capturing the Wisconsin
Quadrangular Championship.
So dominant were the netters that
they won every set in both singles and
doubles play and more often than not
they didn't even surrender one game to
the overmatched Hurons.
Coach John Atwood noted before the
match that EMU was considerably im-
proved over last year's squad, but
nevertheless indicated that he would be
satisfied with nothing less than a
decisive Michigan victory. Needless to
say, he was not disappointed..
"More than anything else, I'm
pleased with the team's concentration
and effort. When you jump to a big lead,
it's'easy to let down. You've got to play
your hardest when you're ahead, and
we did that today,"
The match was Michigan's first on an
outdoor court and surprisingly, this
change of milieu posed no serious
problems for the women. Many of them
took pains to adjust their style to the
faster court surface.
"There's really nothing you can do to
help yourself get used to playing out-
side," explained Atwood. "As we play4

more and more matches outdoors
against tougher opponents, we'll
definitely improve."
Kathy Krickstein, who scored a 6-1, 6-
0 romp in third singles, labelled the
match a good warm-up exercise. "I ex-
pected an easy match," she remarked..
"I concentrated as much on playing the
wind as on playing my opponent."

Fischley in the day's closest match, 6-0,
6-4.
"Barbara didn't perform as well as I
thought she would," offered Karzen.
"In the first set she wasn't thinking.
When she began concentrating and
stopped worrying, Barbara got her
rhythm together."
At one point in the Karzen-Fischley

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following a powerful serve, a move
which flustered the inexperienced
Robinson.
Crosby, coming off a stunning victory
on Saturday, downed Judy Becker, 6-0,
6-1, while Wood took care of Judy
Maison, 6-1, 6-1.
In doubles action, the first team of
Karzen and Ann Kercher handed the
Fischley-Robinson duo a 6-0, 6-1 drub-
bing. The powerful Kercher was par-
ticularly devastating, using her 5-10
frame to swat overhead slams past the
EMU women.
Despite the lopsided score (the same
score as last year's match), both
coaches believe the Michigan-EMU
series to be beneficial. "A match like
this tells us exactly what we have to
work on," stated Huron coach Parker.
"The only thing I object to is facing a
team like Michigan in our first outing."
Atwood expressed a similar view,
although for different reasons. "This
gives us a chance to work on a few
weaknesses. It also allows us to be the
aggressors, to approach the net and put
away the opponent."
The women return to action this
Tuesday against Western Michigan.

Echoing Krickstein's sentiments was
number four singles winner Leticia
Diaz-Perez. After topping EMU's Carol
Bachinsky in quick fashion, the fresh-
person from Ann Arbor commented
that she enjoys playing outside. A fast
court, she said, adds to the effec-
tiveness of her ground strokes.
"Leticia played better than expec-
ted," Atwood said. "Due to her illness
two weeks ago, she has had little time to
practice and I felt that she had lost
some speed over the weekend."
Joining Krickstein and Diaz-Perez in
the winners' circle were Sue Weber,
Lisa Wood, Elaine Crosby and Kathy
Karzen. Karzen, playing first singles,
defeated EMU's talented Barbara

contest, the Huron star grumbled to her
coach Judy Parker, "I feel fine. I just
can't play." The fact that Fischley is
recovering from elbow surgery undoub-
tedly affected her game.
The diminutive Weber was uncharac-
teristically aggressive in whipping
Donna Robinson, 6-3, 6-0. On repeated
occasions Weber charged the net

Daily Photo by ALAN BILINSKY
NUMBER ONE SINGLES player Kathy Karzen fires back one of her many
winners. She cruised to a 6-0, 6-4 victory Wednesday over Barbara Fischley of
E MU, in helping the Wolverines shut out the hapless Hurons.

TEAM DEBUTS SA TURDA Y:
Women 's softball set for action

THE SELIGSON PLAYERS Present
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By DAN PERRIN
For the first time in the history of
Michigan sports, the men's baseball
team won't be the only one throwing
runners out in the spring. Coach Gloria'
Soluk and the newly formed women's
softball team will take the field this
Saturday at Northwestern and begin a
new era for women at Michigan.
According to women's athletic direc-
tor Phyllis Ocker, "The Board in Con-
trol (of Intercollegiate Athletics) voted
in 1977 to go with softball so the number
of sports for women and men would be
equal."
"SOFTBALL IS popular in Michigan
as evidenced by the large number of
high schools that have teams. Oppor-
tunities for women are now equal," said
Ocker.
"We got the team together through
on-campus publications and signs put
up all over campus explaining when
tryouts were," said Coach Soluk. "We
made one cut and have 22 kids left; all
are walk-ons.
"We'll do some recruiting and have
three scholarships available for next
year," continued the rookie mentor. "If
we don't find better players next year,
we'll give them (the scholarships) to
the girls we already have."
For Szluk, senior Terry Conlin and
freshmen Brenda Venhuizen and Deb
Allor, softball means yet another sport
to compete in this year. All three played
varsity basketball this winter for.Coach
Soluk in her first year coaching basket-
ball at Michigan.
BUT THAT'S O.K. with Conlin, who
noted, "It (playing two sports) is the
type of thing I was used to in high
school. It's fine for me because I like all
the exercise I can get."
"I'm'really sports-oriented and I love

to compete," continued the physical
education major. "I'm not going out
just to win, win, win; I enjoy it, too."
Terry, obviously enthused to be able
to participate in a second sport, is sorry
she couldn't play softball three years
earlier.
"It's great we're getting softball star-
ted as an intercollegiate sport," said
the Ann Arbor St. Thomas High School
graduate. "It's just too bad it's my last
year in school."
FOR VENHUIZEN, it's a slightly dif-
ferent story. Brenda was so involved in
tennis at Marine City (Mi.) High School
that she never had a chance to play

year's team has great potential.
"From what I've seen, the team looks
good,"said Conlin. "We still have a lot
of things to smooth over but I think
we're progressing nicely."
Venhuizen and Allor both concurred
with their teammate. "There are a lot
of experienced girls on the team,"
remarked Venhuizen. "For the first
year we'll do all right."
"IT LOOKS like we may be com-
petitive," concluded Allor. "Even with
all walk-ons, there's a lot of athletic
talent out there."
The ultimate authority, Coach Soluk,
conveyed the same positive attitude.

Soluk, who led the Hamtramck St:-
Laudislas High School softball team to
a pair of city and Detroit Catholic
League championships compiled an
impressive 40-6 record from 1970-74.
She held a dual role similar to her
present one in her first year at Wayne
State University where she coached
from 1974-77.
"I was hired (at Wayne) to coach
basketball, but we had a better year in
volleyball (the other sport she coached)
finishing second in the conference,"
said the mother of three.
A SIMILAR situation has occurred
here because Soluk was not originally
hired to coach softball. Although the
women have been together for just four
weeks, the team is basically set.
Freshman Shelly Piilo and juniors
Teresa Gardoski and Bonnie Schwan
constitute a trio of "very good pit-
chers," according to Soluk. Deb Allor
will replace the injured Sheryl Tominac
behind the plate in Saturday's opener.
Veteran Terry Conlin will lead an in-
field that includes Brenda Venhuizen,
Kalamazoo Loy Norrix High School
graduate Anna Bullard and Tammy
Herremans.
Seniors Ann Slade and Diane Met-
telman and freshmen Teresa Wyckoff
and Fran Wiecha will roam the outfield
this season.

icign ''i ls Womn'is Softball111Schedu(lhe

Apr.8 Northwestern, Indiana
Apr. 10 GRAND VALLEY (2)
Apr. I1 Michigan State (2)
Apr. 15 Detroit (2)
Apr. 22 CENTRAL MICH. (2)*
Apr. 25 BOWLING GREEN
Apr. 29 Jackson CC

May I HOPE (2)
May 5-6 SMAIAW Championships
May 12-13 MAIAW Cha mpionships
May 24-27 AIAW Champi nships
All games at Ferry Field at 3 p.m.
except * at noon.
(Home games in capitals)

fast-pitch softball until this year.
Venhuizen chose to play on her prep
school men's tennis team during the
spring rather than join her fellow
females on the playing field. Her com-
mitment to softball was limited to
summer slow-pitch leagues. ,
"It takes a lot of time, but I'm not
carrying that big of a load," said the
pre-business student. "I can always
find time to do homework because I
love sports."
When asked about her time commit-
ments, freshman Allor put the study
versus sport question in perspective.
"YOU HAVE TO learn to use your
time effectively," pointed out the pre-
law major. "Going away on the road, I
can't always get a lot done. But I
usually can make it up."
While each team member has her
own way to balance the books and the
bats, all three women agree that this

"I'm more optimistic than I was with
the basketball team when I first saw
them," announced the confident Wayne
State graduate. "Because we're going
to have pretty strong pitching and cat-
ching, we should be fairly com-
petitive."

Morrison returns to

Yost for
Hockey playoff action is coming to
Yost after all.
But it won't be the Michigan
Wolverines taking the ice on the night of
April 19th. Instead, the Toledo Goal-
diggers and Milwaukee Admirals of the
International Hockey League (IHL)
will be using the rink for the fifth game

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no admission charge refreshments

playoffs
of their seven-game playoff series.
The Goaldiggers were supposed to be
the original hosts of the game, but, a
flower show will be moving into the
Toledo Arena at that time, forcing the
Goaldiggers to search out -another
arena in the area. They chose Yost for
its smooth surface and the size of tle
rink.
Former Michigan forward Gary
Morrison plays for the Admirals, who
finished third in the 1hi this seaso,
one spot behind the Goaldiggers. TI q
series opens in Toledo for the first two
games on the 12th and 14th of April.
Milwaukee will host games three and
four on the 15th and 17th, and if the fifth
game is necessary it will be played at
Yost at 8 p.m. on the 19th.
A sixth game, if necessary, would be
played in Milwaukee~on the 22nd, and
the seventh would be played back in
Toledo on the 26th.
Tickets for'the game to be played at
Yost are $3 for students and $5 for
general admission. No reserved seats
will be sold. -Daily Sports
Batsmen
just not
muders
Even though the sun was shining, the'
winds were calm and the skies were
cloudless-near-perfect baseball
weather-yesterday's scheduled;
doubleheader between Michigan and,
Toledo baseball teams was called off
due to the muddy conditions at Fisher
Stadium.
So Michigan will take another stab at
opening the season this afternoon, as
they will try to take on the Rockets at 2
p.m. Michigan, not wishing to press its
luck, will try to get just one game in this

VS4*
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