100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 02, 1978 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 10-Sunday, April 2, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Terrorist Haddad dead at 50

South University near Washtenaw * 769-1744
The Problem
-PIRGIM found that 95 % of
leases contain illegal clauses

The. Solto
-Outlaw misleading leases
YES ON A&B

BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP( - Dr. Wadi
Haddad, reputed "godfather" of inter-
national terrorism, was reported dead
Saturday by Palestinian officials, but a
mystery developed over the cause and
place of death of this man who topped
Israel's most-wanted list.
The Popular Front for the Liberation
of Palestine (PFLP) issued a statement
here saying the Marxist guerrilla
leader and former pediatrician
"acquired martyrdom" three days ago.
THREE BEIRUT newspapers said
Haddad, 50, died of an "incurable
disease" at an East Berlin hospital, and
some Palestinian sources said he had
leukemia.
But the PFLP, a radical group Had-
dad helped found, said he died in an
Arab country, which was not named.
And the Arabic phrase for "acquired
martyrdom" is seldom used to indicate
death from illness.
"I can only say he did not die in
Beirut," said a PFLP spokesperson. "I
can't say now where or why he died."
AFTER FIRST saying Haddad would
be buried in Beirut, the PFLP com-
mand issued a later statement confir-
ming an announcement in Baghdad
that the body had been flown to the
Iraqi capital Saturday and would be
buried there Monday.
Haddad was believed to have planned
history's first mulfiple hijack in 1970,
the massacre at Israel's Lod Airport in
1972, the abduction of Arab oil ministers
in 1975 and the aircraft hijackings to
Entebbe in 1976 and Mogadishu in 1977.
The latter hijackings backfired.
In 1967, Haddad formed the PFLP
with his classmate at the American
University of, Beirut, Dr. George
Habash.
HABASH WAS the political head and
Haddad the chief of the foreign
operations bureau of the PFLP, a fac-
tion of the Palestinain guerrilla
SUBJECTS WANTED:
Earn $3 in one hour. Participate in
nteresting research on human
memory.
Call Kim, 763-0444,
bet. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
AL
Poid for by the Coalition for Better Housing.'
Ballot Question commttee

movement that has been known to buck
the control of the umbrella Palestine
Liberation Organization and its chair-
man, Yasser Arafat.
Haddad and Habash split in 1976 in a
dispute over what Habash regarded as
"unsanctioned operations, but the
PFLP yesterday still proclaimed Had-
dad a "martyr and great struggler for
Palestine's liberation."
A chain of highly disciplined un-
derground PFLP cells in Western
Europe forged strong ties with West
Germany's Baader-Meinhof gang
during Haddad's time with the PFLP.
He also commanded the allegiance of
the Japanese Red Army.
HE USED his European cells to stun
the world with the timed hijack of four
jetliners in September 1970. An
American jumbo jet was comman-
deered over Europe and blown up at
Cairo airport. Three Western European
planes were firebombed at a desert air-
strip in Jordan. All passengers and
crews were released before the ex-
plosions.
"Carlos," the notorious Venezuelan

terrorist believed to have trained under
Haddad, was said to have taken part in
Haddad's cloak-and-dagger war with
Mossad, the Israeli secret service. That
conflict killed many agents in France,
Belgium and Scandinavia in the early
1970s.
Another spectacular operation at-
tributed to Haddad's planning was
Carlos' 1975 daylight abduction of oil
ministers from a Vienna meeting of the
Organization of Petroleum Exporting
Countries.
CARLOS AND cohorts stormed the
conference hall, killed three guards and
took the ministers on a transcontinental
journey aboard a hijacked plane. He
released them unharmed in Algiers and
Tripoli.
Haddad's clerkish appearance
disguised one of the most cunning,
militant brains of the Palestinian
guerrilla movement.
His precise hand was seen behind the
1972 hijack of a Lufthansa jetliner from
India to Aden and the 1977 hijack of a
Japan Air Lines plane to Algiers by
Japanese Red Army guerrillas.

Tenant campaign nears finish

<RISING STAR
the u-Mn Poety
and Translation
w n al
SON SALE APRIL 3-7
in the Fishbowl,
Michigan Union
and Hopwood Room

(Continued from Page 1
publicly that you favor deception in
leases."
Phil Weaver, WPOA president, said,
however, the reason for the lack of
massive opposition is that the large
local management companies, which
would have the most clout in rallying
opposition, have decided not to bother
opposing the proposals.
"The big boys aren't interested (in
the ballot issues) ..., "Weaver said last
week. "They're just businessmen. It
doesn't upset them, but it upsets little
people."
THE "TRUTH in Renting Act" would
prohibit landlords from including
Birth defects
are forever.
Unless you help.
TO PROTECT THE UNBORN
AND THE NEWBORN
March of Dimes

illegal and unenforceable clauses in,
their leases. Also, it would require them
to give their tenants specific infor-
mation about their legal rights.
The "Fair Rental Information Act"
proposes that the city pay for a tenants'
rights booklet consisting of a section
written by impartial authors selected
by the mayor, one written by pro-tenant
attorneys, and one written by pro-
landlord attorneys.

West Germany paid a $5 million ran-
som to free the Lufthansa hostages and
Japan paid $6 million for the JAL
passengers.
PALESTINIAN insiders say Haddad
died before realizing a cherished
dream, to set up a secret terror network
in the United States.
Haddad developed a flare for disguise
after a 1969 assassination attempt that
the Lebanese government blamed on
Israel's secret service. He escaped but
took new security precautions.
With a forged passport, Haddad
would slip undetected into Baghdad
disguised as a turbaned Moslem sheik.
The next day he would appear in Beirut
in the flowing roles of a Maronite
Christian priest.
One of Haddad's earlier bold feats
was his 1968 rescue of Habash from a
heavily guarded Syrian jail. Dressed as
Syrian military police, Haddad and 15
other PFLP commandos showed up at
the prison in military jeeps with forged
orders to transfer Habash to another
jail. Habash was delivered and Haddad
drove him across the border to
Lebanon.

CBH members are responsible for
registering most of the 5,000 new voters
in what has been one of the most suc-
cessful registration drives in recent
city history.
Whether or not those voters stop by
the polls tomorrow could determine if
the apparent landlord strategy is a wise
one and whether or not the tenants'
rights initiatives will become law.

State Bar opposes

appointive
By STEVE SHAER
After heated debate, the Represen-
tative Assembly of the State Bar of
Michigan yesterday voted to affirm its
support of a plan which would change
the status of Michigan's high court
judges from elective to appointive.
The proposed plan calls for the ap-
pointment of judges to Michigan's
Supreme Court, and the Court of Ap-
peals by the Governor. The governor
would chose from three nominees
presented by a non-partisan com-
mission. If the governor failed to choose
one of the three, lots would be drawn to
determine the judge.
VOTERS WOULD decide whether to
retain or remove the appointed judge

judge pan
after about two years. Judges would be
limited to three terms.
The plan was formulated by a citizens
group, the Michigan citizens to Take
the Courts Out of Partisan Politics. Bar
member Avery Cohn brought a
resolution before the Assembly to
revoke the Bar's support of basic prin-
ciples of the plan, which it endorsed in
1974.
"If the petition succeeds, it will limit
the say of the voter," said Cohn. "A
three term limit for judges and the
drawing by lot of a judge is not done in
any other state," said Cohen. Twenty-
six states use similar, but not identical,
merit systems for judicial selection.
"FIVE YEARS ago this assembly
favored merit selection. Now we have
citizens' organizations circulating
petitions throughout the state," said
John Krusl, a proponent of the plan.
"We just can't pull the rug out from
them.'"
The citizens' group must collect over
250,000 petition signatures to have the
proposal placed on the November state-
wide ballot. Student volunteers began
the drive to obtain signatures on the
University campus two weeks ago.
The Assembly, which represents over
15,000 lawyers, met at the Hilton Inn in
Lansing yesterday for its semi-annual
meeting.

DISCO
Lessons at
DAINCE
SPRCE
3141/2 S. State
CALL 995-4242
for schedule
and registration
information.

411 , 1

l/ v
CIL

Paid for by the Coalition for Better Housing/
B Q C Greg Hesterberg, Treasurer

I

and now

a word
about

Our FALL BOOK RUSH 1

978

APRIL 3-21
!. Applications Taken from April 3 through April 21, 1978 Will Receive Equal Condidera-
tion With Applications Taken June 5-21 for FALL BOOK RUSH. A Lottery System will be used
for these applications to determine hiring order.
iI. The Cellar Will take applications at later times than indicated in (1); however, subsequent
applications will be placed in hiring order by Date of Application, and they will receive
priority after those taken in (1).
1i1 Former Rush Employees in good standing Need Not Reapply for FALL RUSH and will
receive top priority over all other applicants.
IV. All applicants hired for FALL RUSH will be notified by phone or mail later in the summer.
Rush employees hired to work in August should expect to work through and beyond regis-
tration. HOWEVER, all rush jobs are, unfortunately, only temporary. Starting pay is $2.93
per hour.
V. Permanent positions which may open up after Rush will be filled by employees who worked
FALL RUSH. Post-Rush hiring is done departmentally, on the basis of the employep's Rush
performance and their availability for the unified hours.
VI. After SEPTEMBER 30, 1978, all unused applications will be thrown away. Therefore, appli-
cants must reapply for each future rush that they wish to work. ABSOLUTELY NO APPLICA-
TIONS WILL BE UPDATED OR KEPT ON FILE FOR FUTURE RUSHES.
UNFORTUNATELY. WE HAVE ABSOLUTELY NO JOBS AVAILABLE CURRENTLY OR FOR THE

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan