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March 30, 1978 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-03-30

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 30, 1978.-page 7
Dorm decor hits 'lofty' heights

.. By MARLENE MALINAS
..~ FOR RENT: Modern tri-level, fully
L carpeted, complete with bar, study
area, wood paneling.
Sound like a dream come true? It can
be yours for only $220 a month in a
5.University dorm.
Of course, you have to be willing to
'a . put ina little work first.
MOST DORM rooms start out with
xe.....only the essentials - a desk, dresser
and bed. The dimensions of an average
room are 100 square feet, with the
ceilings about nine and one-half feet
above the floor. It sounds bleak, but
with a little imagination and a substan-
.. tial investment, these basic quarters
gw>< can actually be made quite livable.
Tocreate extra space in the box-like
F rooms, lofts have increased in use over
the past few years. A wooden frame is
.. built some seven feet above the floor to
support the bed, thus freeing the floor
space for other purposes.
Senior Bill Rice, a resident advisor at
Couzens Hall, has transformed his
average-sized single room into a com-
fortable bi-level,
THE FIRST level of Rice's haven
Daily Photo by BRAD BENJAMIN serves as a front room and extends
RICK SCHMALE AND CHARLIE ROTHSTEIN relax in their elaborately decorated Markley room. Like a growing number seven feet back. The other five feet'of
of University students, the pair have taken pains to make their cramped dorm quarters more livable.
$8.3 BILLION CAL L ED INSUFFICIENT:
City officials boot Carter's plan

floor space house the water bed he
bought used for $15. Six feet above the
floor, Rice has constructed a second-
story loft with wood he purchased for
$50. Both levels are fully carpeted.
Charlie Rothstein and Rick Sch-
male's Markley Hall room looks more
like the interior of a van than a dorm
room. The entire room is carpeted with
rich orange shag carpeting - ceiling,
desks, walls, everything. Their quar-
ters are virtually soundproof thanks to
the carpeting. Moreover, Rothstein
notes, "This room buffers all of the bad
qualities of a dorm."
Since their room is located on the first
floor of the complex, the ceiling is
higher than most, in this case, twelve
feet above the floor. The two have
created a separate second floor which
serves as a loft. To do this, however,
required a bit of electrical engineering
- hooking up a new light under the new
"ceiling."

sformed their sixth floor room into a tri-
level. Upon entrance, visitors must~step
up into the "lounge area" which
features a beanbag chair and a . A
short wall of wood paneling sepajtes
this from the second level, which serves
as a study area. The third level is.the
loft. A pull-down ladder marks t en-
trance to the upper floor which is ed
by an exhaust fan when it become too
hot.

WASHINGTON (AP) - Some city of-
ficials, looking at how President Car-
ter's new urban policy actually will
work, say the $8.3 billion plan may not
carry enough money.
Says a New York City official: "We
like what we see, but I've got to tell you
- $8.3 billion wouldn't save the South
Bronx, let alone the rest of urban
America."
WHILE CARTER'S proposed new
spending and tax breaks for 'lqcal
businesses seem like a lot, the money
must be spread out among the nation's
18,500 cities, towns or villages.
Administration officials, sensitive to
criticism that the urban plan includes
actual spending of just $742 million next
year, stress the 150/ program changes
that Carter has ordered. "There is a lot
more here than just money," says one
official.
Nevertheless, the spotlight is on the
spending proposals, which will go to
Congress soon.

DETROIT SEEKS $23 million in
federal aid to improve just one area -
the huge Belle Isle Island Park. While
the city would use public works money
on the project, rather than relying on
the proposed urban parks fund, the
total pricetag indicates the degree of
disrepair of many urban parks.
An informal survey of planning of-
ficials in Boston, Milwaukee, Detroit
and Peoria, Ill., indicates a substantial
and increasing need for federal aid,
especially among older cities whose
eroding tax bases make it difficult to
raise local revenues.
Larry Frishman, planning director in
Peoria, says his city will apply for a
share of the $4.5 billion that Carter
earmarked to stimulate business ac-
tivity in distressed areas.
"WE'RE AN old city, trying to
redevelop our downtown area," Frish-
man said. His first evaluation of the
Carter plan: "I'm afraid there doesn't
seem to be much money in it. It looks

underfunded for our purposes."
One example of how city needs out-
strip the President's plan is in Boston,
where housing aide Andrew Olins said
the city needs $6 million to $12 million
for home rehabilitation loans, which
Carter wants to expand nationally to
$150 million.
"Weigh our needs against the
national total and you sense the
disparity," Olins says.
CARTER ALSO is urging $150 million
in a new federal effort to develop urban
parks and recreation.
In context, the parks fund is blood
from a rock, and!I for one am grateful,"
says one city parks director who asked
that he not be named. "But I have to tell
you, the money won't go far. Everyone
is going to want a piece."
Milwaukee's deputy city planning
commissioner, John Bechler, says his
city just built four day-and-night
basketball courts in a housing project
at a cost of $50,000.

HEALTH CARE is another example.
Carter's urban health initiative would
increase spending for health clinics in
poor neighborhoods from $10 million to
$30 million in 1981.
Boston says it needs $12 million a
year to run its extensive network of
neighborhood-based health clinics
properly. This year the city is spending
$5 million to support 24 facilities.
Hospitals Director David Rosenblum
says glumly. "Trouble is, we're going
broke doing it, and we're meeting only
half the need of Boston's.poor."

Jog.*
Just for the
health of it.
Physical Education Public Information
American Allance for Health
Physical Education and Recreation
1201 16th St N W Washington 0 C 20036

~%ARMY SURPLUS.
LEVI SALE
Levi's Straight Legs and Sef-Bottoms $12.9
Army Fatigue Pants and Shirts
Just arrived-Full selection-New and used
Coleman Peak I Backpacking Stove
No. 576-700 Reg. $28.98 SALE $23.98

S. ,

4th Ward:

The lines are drawn

(Continued from Page 1
generally considered crucial to the
composition of Council. Long known as
Ann Arbor's "swing ward," its voters
typically pick the party which will
dominate City Council.
OF THE CITY'S five wards, the
Fourth contains the largest slice of
town as well as a vast socio-economic
cross-section of the community.
Located on the southeast side of the
city, it is home to the largest number of
registered voters in Ann Arbor (over
18,000).
This diverse constituency in the ward
has made the problem of tenants
another priority issue with the can-
didates. Calling, upon his housing ex-
perience from his student days, Fisher
said he can empathize with the city's
tenants.
"To me, the real difference is that it's
(solutions to housing problems) got to
England held its first state lottery in
1569 to raise money for construction of
harbors. Altogether, 40,000 tickets were
sold at 10 shillings each. Over the years,
private lotteries were gradually sup-
pressed and public lotteries lost favor,
the last one being held in 1860.

come through the cooperation of the
people. They've got to work together be
cause they've got to mutually benefit
each other."
Cappaert noted that housing is scarce
in the city and stressed the fact that
he's been "rapping landlords since
'67." He added that he- feels very
strongly that the University must con-
tribute more to solving the housing
shortage.

We specialize in
ladies's and children's
hairstyling
DASCOLA STYLISTS
" 615 E. Liberty-668-9329
* 3739 Washtenow-971 -9975
* 613 N. Maple-761-2733
* 1611 E. University-662-0354

Seaway Two-Man Nylon Tent
with Rainfly complete with stakes, poles, and stuff
Reg. $43.98 NOW $36.98

sack

Camp Trails Backpacks and Bookbags
ENTIRE STOCK 10% OFF
ALSO IN STOCK:
Eureka tents, Twin Peaks Sleeping Bags, Dexter and Danner Hiking
Boots, Best selection of Knives in town - Buck, Schrade, Puma, and
Swiss Army Knives.

Fisher

Due to an increased interest in PSYCHIC PHENOMENA, LADY ATHENA is
conducting a seminar and workshop, April 1st and 2nd, 1978, at the Ra-
mada Airport Inn, on some phases of this subject. Classes are limited to
the first 30 persons registering.
LADY ATHENA
PSYCHIC PHENOMENA WORKSHOP TOPICS INCLUDE:
" TELEPATHY
* CLAIRVOYANCE
* AUTOVOYANCE
" CANDLE RITUAL USE FOR SELF HELP
" DISCUSSION OF WITHCRAFT REINCARNATION
Call for more information-981-0719

210 E. Washington at Fourth-994-3572
OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY 9-6,

master charge
wE ,.. of

Cappaert

s'
~~Stu'd
in Itay
Next Fall
Barbieri Center/Rome Campus
Sponsored By
TRINITY COLLEGE
Office of Educational Services
Hartford, Conn. 06106

0

JUNIORS
Don't be left out
of your
1979 MICHIGANENSIAN Yearbook!

r
i

Cappaert
FOURTH WARD DEMOCRAT
CAPPAERT ON THE ISSUES
" "THE CITY MUST ENCOURAGE AN INCREASE IN THE
SUPPLY OF HOUSING, PARTICULARLY IN THE MODERATE
PRICE RANGE."
" "I SUPPORT WHOLEHEARTEDLY BOTH TENANTS RIGHTS
BALLOT PROPOSALS."
" "OUR LOCAL GOVERNMENT SHOULD PUT A GREATER
EMPHASIS ON HUMAN SERVICES, SUCH AS HEALTH
CARE, DAY-CARE, AND JOB TRAINING SERVICES."
" "OUR ROADS NEED FIXING IN A WELL-PLANNED MAN-
NER THAT WILL MAINTAIN THEM IN THE FUTURE."
" "WE MUST CAREFULLY MONITOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL
IMPACT OF PROPOSED CITY DEVELOPMENT. WE SHOULD
LEARN FROM THE MISTAKES OF OTHER CITIES."

s
0.
i
I'

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