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March 28, 1978 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 10-Tuesday, March 28, 1978-The Michigan Daily

L A

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Archeological dig? Daily Photo by CABLE
Though this appears like the ruins of ancient Rome, it is actually the continuing construction of the addition to the Law
Library.
ners return t work
as 112-day striTkeAsendds
By The A~ssocia ted Press

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Thousands of miners ripped coal out of the earth yesterday
for the first time in 112 days, bringing an end to the nation-
wide soft coal strike for most of the industry.
Reports from across the coal fields showed that
operations were beginning to return to normal as United
Mine Workers donned their hardhats, shouldered picks,
boarded heavy equipment and went back to work for the first
pay-day since the strike by 160,000 union members began
Dec. 6.
But for others it was a different story. Some miners, who
wanted to get back to work and found mine construction
workers picketing, followed the time-honored coal country
tradition of observing picket lines.
1 WAS ON my way up the hollow when the pickets turned
me back," said James Darby, an electrician for the Valley
Camp Coal Co. in West Virginia. Mines also remained closed
in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and Pennsylvania.
Meanwhile, negotiations for a new contract for the 10,000
mine construction workers were going on in Washington,
where both sides reported they were closing in on an
agreement. "We are making good progress," an industry
representative said.
The workers, who build mine shafts and other facilities,
are believed to be seeking a contract similar to the one ap-

proved by the miners.
THE MAJORITY OF the nation's mines were open by the
8 a.m. shift. Eastern Associated Coal Co. saidonly one of its
17 West Virginia mines was shut. Consolidated Coal Co. said
38 of its 51 mines across the country were open. U.S. Steel and
Bethlehem Steel both reported that the morning turnout was
good at the total of 46 mines in three states that they operate.
"We're back to work," a U.S. Steel spokesman said. "It's
been a very smooth operation so far."
DESPITE THE SCATTERED shutdowns, most areas said
they expected some shipments of coal would start heading to
coal-short utilities by the end.of the day. It will take an
estimated two or three weeks, though, before normal produc-
tion and shipping resume.
This could be slowed if the construction workers widen
their picketing efforts.
"They're still out," Joe Angleton, compensation counselor
for UMW District 12 in Illinois, said of the members of his
local.
"As far as I know all the mines in the southern area do
have pickets. Our people are ready to return . . . We heard
they (the construction workers) were going to hold off for one
or two days so men could get their $100 bonuk and clothing
allowance. But that fell through."

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MONDAY-THURSDAY 9 to 9
tRIDAY 9 to 5:30

Court to de
WASHINGTON AP - The Supreme
Court said yesterday it will decide
whether states may pay unemployment
benefits to striking workers, but it
refused to reconsider the Miranda
decision protecting the rights of

SATURDAY 10 to 5

SUNDAY 12 to 5

eide on strike benefits
criminal suspects. which the company's employees stayed
The justices voted to hear arguments off their jobs for seven months.
sometime next fall in a New York A federal trial judge struck down the
Telephone Co. attempt to overturn a state law providing for the unem-
state law allowing unemployment ployment checks but the Second U.S.
payments in strikes lasting longer than Circuit Court of Appeals last November
eight weeks.. restored it.
TEh eCOURT'S eventual decision rsoe t
could have a major national impact on Lawyers for the telephone company,
labor-management relations because supported by attorneys for several in-
manystates have laws similar to New dustrial giants and the U.S. Chamber of
manyseCommerce, had argued that such laws
York's.
New York Telephone's suit against represent governmental subsidies for
the state grew out of a 1971 strike, in
Iohn WAayne. Honorary Crusade Chairman

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