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March 25, 1978 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-03-25

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Page 2-Saturday, March 2,5, 1978-The Michigan Daily
urc Worshp Services

Druggist gets trip in
return for filing suit
(Continued from Page 1)

UNITY OF ANN ARBOR
Sunday Services and Sunday School
-11:00 a.m.
at Howard Jonhson's
2380 Carpenter Rd.
Dial-a-Thought: 971-5230
Where people of all ages learn to ex-
press their inner potentials. For more
information call 971-5262.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
X31 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-10 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a:m., noon, and 5 p.m.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at the Ann Arbor Y,
530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transportation:
663-3233 or 426-3808.
10:00 a.m. -Sunday Worship.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 S.,Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-6:00 p.m.
* * * '
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Morning Service
6:30 p.m.-Informal Worship
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Student Foundation)
218 N. Division
665-0606
Chaplain: Rev. Andrew Foster
Choral Evensong Sunday evenings at
7:00 .p.m. at St. Andrew Episcopal
Church, 306 N. Division.
* * *
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
608 E. William, corner of State
Worship Service-10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship-10 a.m.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL--A Campus
Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Church
1236 Washtenaw Ct.-668-7421
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
Sunday Services at 10 a.m., 6 p.m.
Coffee hour-11:15 a.m.

AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER AND
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron-663-9376
0. Carroll Arnold, Minister
Paul Davis, Interim Campus Minister
Worship-10 a.m.; Bible Study-11
a.m.
Fellowship Meeting--Wednesday at
7:45 p.m.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
State at Huron and Washington
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
The Rev. Fred B. Maitland
The Rev. E. Jack Lemon
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00.
Church School at 9:00 and 11:00.
Adult Enrichment at 10:00.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
W. Thomas Shomaker,
Chaplain/Director
Extensive programming for under-
grads and grad students.
* * *
ANN ARBOR CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(oneblock west of U of M Stadium)
Bible Study-Sunday, 9:30 a.m.;
Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.
Need transportation? Call 662-9928.
* * *
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Services and Sunday School
=10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meeting-8:00
p.m.
Child Care Sunday-under 2 years.
Christian Science Reading Room-,
206 E. Liberty, 10-5 Monday-Saturday;
closed Sundays.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.-663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Easter Sunday Services at 8:45 and
10:30 a.m.
Easter Breakfast at 9:45 a.m.
Midweek Worship Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CH URCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
662-4466
Easter Sunday Services-7:30, 9:30,
11:00 a. m.
12:00-Coffee Hour.
7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Worship at The
Ark Coffee House.
LORD OF LIGHT
LUTHERAN CHURCH
(the campus ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worshipat 11:00a.m.
Sunday Bible Study: Historical Je-
sus/Risen Lord-9:30 am.
Tuesday Bible StudyHistory of the
Bible-7: 30 pm.
Thursday evening Bible Study on
North Campus-8:00 p.m.
Holy Week Services:
Easter Vigil-
Saturday 11:30 p.m.
Easter Service-11:00 a.m.

its program.
The attorneys' request for more than
$2.7 million in legal fees in the Com-
monwealth Edison case remains in
court because of two recent but unsuc-
cessful interest group appeals.
ACCORIDING TO sources, including
his daughter, Cantor, received a ski
vacation in Aspen, Colorado for lending
his name to the lawsuit. The sources
agreed that Cantor and his wife took the
trip a least partly at the expense of the
attorneys.
"It's not totally paid for (by the
lawyers)," Ms. Cantor said of the Mar-
ch 10 to 17 trip, "but a great part of it is.
"That's what he got for backing
them," she added. "That's the only
thing he gets for backing them."
CANTOR, OWNER OF Northland
Pharmacy in Southfield's Northland
Medical Building, acknowledged he
was in Aspen for the week-long ski
vacation, but denied any part of the trip
was paid for by the attorneys.
"There were never any promises of
anything.'' Cantor said. "I wasn't
duped, I knew what I was doing.''
CANTOR'S attorneys also denied
having paid for all or any part of the
ski-vacation. "There is no truth to the
allegations," Sklar said. "I don't care
to discuss it."

Cantor said his excursion to Glory
Hole Ski Lodge cost $379 per person,
with ski-lift tickets and meals ad-
ditional. According to figures supplied
by a Glory Hole spokesperson, who con-
firmed Cantor's week-long stay, a ski
vacation for two persons costs between
$1,000 and $1,200.
CANTOR, WHO describes himself as
an avid skier, said the vacation was
paid for with his credit card. He said
the trip was his first to Aspen since
1974. Cantor had sustained a heart at-
tack the following year.
At that time, Cantor owned a drug
store located in Detroit's Cass Corridor
for 14 years. He sold it in June 1977 and
bought the Southfield store the
following October. He also owns con-
trolling interest in another Detroit drug
store he purchased in 1975.
Cantor, who lives in a city-accessed
$82,000 Farmington Hills home, says he
now regrets having filedhthe lawsuit
and given another chance, he would not
do it again.
Cantor said he was more concerned
that Edison charged customers for the
program, whether they used it or not,
than his claim of lost profits on bulb
sales.
Despite the lawsuit, neighbors said
Cantor regularly used the Edison light
bulb program.

UGO CARDINAL POLETTI, vicar of Pope Paul VI as bishop of Rome,
celebrated the foot washing ceremony in St. John Lateran basilica yester-
day, imitating Jesus Christ washing the feet of the Apostles. Cardinal Poletti
substitutes for the Pope who skipped most of Easter week ceremonies for
the first time in his 15-year reign because of a bout of flu. Thousands of
Christian pilgrims retraced the steps of Christ during a rainy Good Friday
in Jerusalem. Led by Franciscan friars wearing brown habits, the proces-
sion slowly made its way through Jerusalem's alleyways. Back in the U.S.,
New Hampshire's Gov. Meldrim Thomson, rebuffed by the U.S. Supreme
Court, asked for federal court permission to lower flags on state buildings
"to commemorate the historial impact on western civilization of the life and
teachings of Jesus Christ." Five clergymen, represented by the New Ham-
shire Civil Liberties Union, have challenged the flag lowering as a violation
of the U.S. constitution.

NO OPPOSITION SEEN YET:

Ballot proposals may face baule

Chili

ALWAYS FRESH,
7days...

(Continued from Page 1)
Phil Weaver, president of the Wash-
tenaw Property Owners Association
and a local landlord, said the 2,000 lan-
dlords in Ann Arbor aren't planning to
fight the proposals. He said the few
large management companies in the
city, which would have the most clout in
rallying opposition, have chosen not to
come out against the proposals.
"The big boys aren't interested (in
the ballot issues) . . . They're just
businessmen," he said. "It doesn't up-
set them, but it upsets little people."
Weaver said large-scale landlord op-
position was easy to attract with the
rentcontrol issue because "everyone
cared."
DESPITE Weaver's assurances, a
last-minute campaign against the
referendums still remains a possibility.
The successful battle against rent con-
trol in 1975 was launched only days
before the election and was effective in
overpowering months of campaigning
for the proposal.
Dave Anderson, attorney for the
Michigan Landlord's Association in
Lansing, hinted that opposition against
the proposals is forming, but said he
would not discuss the matter in the in-
terest of protecting his clients.
CBH is budgeted to spend $5,800 in the
campaign, but treasurer Greg Hester-

berg said that landlords have the
resources to raise double that figure in
less than a week's time.
KUNIN SAID a high voter turnout
could be the key to passage of the,
legislation. CBH members accounted
for registering most of the 5,000 new
voters in what has been one of the most
successful registration drives in recent
city history.
Campaign observers say landlords
fear that if the legislation passes, it will
give momentum to other - more
severe. -tenant's rights causes such as
rent control.
Though the Truth in Renting proposal
meets wide support among local
politicians, both Democratic and
Republican, endorsement of the Fair
Rental Information Act is mixed within
the GOP.
"I'M ABSOLUTEIY opposed to it,"
said Councilman Louis Belcher (R-
Fifth Ward), a mayoral candidate. "I
think the present (City Council-
approved tenants' rights) book is
basically a good book. I think it (Fair
Rental Information Act) is going to hurt
tenants more than anything else."
Mayor Albert Wheeler said he favors
the Fair Rental Information Act even
though he thinks the present booklet is
"a pretty good thing."

Jonathan Rose, co-author of the
referendums and attorney for the
Michigan Student Assembly Housing
Law Reform Project, said the present
tenants' booklet resulted from partisan
squablling within Council, so advice to
tenants in the booklet met much com-
promise.
TIle Tril - in Renting
proposal gires u i1 1(1-
lOr(ls ( lot of grief beca use
it 175(keCs 11;look lad. It 's
like (a>rest> urant lIlliging
11p) ( sfgn S(f1ili there s (
f(Iliger of lotlilistinin te

can sign away a legal right you have.'
Belcher said he supports the Truth in
Renting Act, but would prefer seeing it
rewritten.
"What I'd rather see is a list of the
common clauses that are illegally writ-
ten into the legislation.
IANDLORD WEAVER said hewob-
jects to a provision in the act which
would require leases to include a war-
ning that they may contain unenfor-
ceable or illegal clauses.
..It gives us landlords a lot of grief
because it makes us, look bad.'' said
Weaver. "It's like a restaurant hanging
up a sign saying there's a danger of
botulism in the food."
The Truth in Renting proposal comes
at a time when the legality of some
clauses in housing leases has been
questioned. An October study by the
Public Interest Research Group in
Michigan revealed that most Ann Arbor
leases examined contain 'illegal, unen-
forceable or abusive clauses."
THOUGII SOME politicians say they
think tenants' rights legislation should
be left controlled by City Council or-
dinances, Goldberg disagrees.
"The political reason they are both on
the ballot is that they will both be
beyond reach of a Council ma jority,
he said.

food. "

-Prsil We,
Prsident.

with our own special touch
and introducing:
Ba elchips 490
at the
Bagel Factory
130 South University
"Expert in
Tray Catering"

IXishleffu', Pro peruy
Owners .'ssOci(ltioni
GR EATER SUPPORT exists for the
Truth in Renting proposal.
"The (Truth in Renting Act) is so
simple as to be-obvious and necessary,'
said Joel Goldberg,D emocratic Coun-
cil candidate in the Fifth Ward. "Most
people unfortunately don't realize you

Vance says no 'oust-Beg pl an

'U U
-U

a

EboY Films Presents
4 Academy Award winner
EARTHQUAKE
starring CHARLESTON HESTON
SAT., March 25-7 & 9 pm

(Continued from Page 1)
United States remains committed to
Israel's security despite deep differen-
ces with Begin and would even consider
an eventual U.S.-Israeli agreement.
At a Washington news conference,
Vance also denied the reports .of a
"dump Begin" effort. "That is totally
false," he said. "We have the highest
respect for Mr. Begin although we have
had disagreements. It would be totally
improper for us to interfere. We will not
do it and we have Yot done so."
Egyptian diplomats yesterday

welcomed reports of a rift between
Israel and the United States and said
they hoped it would force the Israelis to
realize they must trade occupied lands
for peace.
"For the first time in 30 years a U.S.
president supported. by Congress has
really reprimanded Israel. This is
progress," said one diplomat.
IN ISRAEL, Defense Minister Ezer
Weizman called for a government of
national unity committed to peace, one
that would include the opposition Labor

MLB AUD 4

Admission $1.50

METROPOLIS FILM
SOCIETY PRESENTS:
MARMTH1ON MAIN
Dustin Hoffman pitted against the ultimate
villian of all time, a sadistic, egotistical,
~1 ~ 3Nazi dentist who prefers to work without
g ' I41_J'j~lt 1 anesthetics. A chilling nightmare that
leaves audiences gasping!
Friday and Saturday,
March 24, 25 MLB Room 1
Admission $1.50 Showtimes: 7:30 9:45

MEDIATRICS
PRESENTS
Alfred Hitchcock's
NORTH BY NORTHWEST'
This superb thriller is representative of the unique suspense
genre that Hitchcock created, and includes some brilliant
editing. Cary Grant plays the unsuspecting american busi-
nessman who becomes increasingly involved in the sinister
plot.
Saturday, March 25
7:00 & 9:30-Nat. Sci. Aud.
admission $1.50
9T ThTAV ~4><'s

Party.
But the Jerusalem Post said in a front
page story yesterday that Labor inten-
ds to call for Begin's resignation and
push for a no-confidence vote in
parliament over his handling of
Mideast peace moves.
The drive for peace in the Middle
East is "much slowed down" but the
United States will be patient and per-
severe, Vance said during his press
conference.
VANCE TOLD the press that
President Carter had relayed "some
exploratory ideas' to Israeli Prime
PITCH
Birth Defects
are forever
Unless you
HELP
MARCH OF DIMES
THIS SPACE CONTRIBUTED BY THE PUBLISHER

Minister Menachem Begin in their talks
earlier this week and he denied "the
atmosphere was unfriendly or ugly."
Without going into detail, Vance hin-
ted that Carter's proposals centered on
an interim plan for the occupied West
Bank of the Jordan River leading even-
tually to a choice by the Palestinians
whether to affiliate with Israel or Jor-
dan.
"The United States will persevere,"
Vance said. "It will be patient. Let me
make it crystal-clear we have not given
up hope.
HE SAID Begin's talks with Carter
"were difficult" but he refused to be
drawn into a discussion of whether
negotiations can be stepped up so long
as Begin remains prime minister.
Begin has refused to accept U.N.
Security Council resolution 242 as a
directive to withdraw from occupied
West Bank lands, insisted on main-
taining Jewish settlements in the Sinai
and West Bank areas, and refused to
give West Bank Palestinians an even-
tual vote on whether they wish to af-
filiate with Jordan or remained linked
to Israel.
Nonetheless, Vance said, "We are not
at the point where we are giving up
hope" for peace prospects. "There is
still a real chance to move forward, and
to imply that we are in a desperate
state is not accurate."

NOTICE
NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH
. r - _L ____ : ..a..1 a.

TH-iF GRFAT VI.GII OF FASTER

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