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March 17, 1978 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-03-17

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Page 8-Friday, March 17, 1978-The Michinan Daily
THIS FALL
MOVE UP
In addition to completely furnished
apartments and a convenient location,
UNIVERSITY TOWERS offers you an atmos-
phere conducive -to your college life-
whether it be studying or partying or
somewhere in between. If you enjoy
meeting people and socializing we have
FREE MOVIES and PARTIES throughout the
school year. If you prefer privacy for
studying (or whatever) our one and two
bedroom apartments are what you are
looking for. Stop by or call for rental
-_ _ information. Models now open.

COMMITTEE REQUESTS ASSISTAI 'E:
Plymouth Cente

By MICHAEL ARKUSH
The new seven man task force
assigned by Governor Milliken to in-
vestigate charges of abuse at the
Plymouth Center for Human Develop-
ment conducted its first meeting Wed-
nesday but failed to discuss any sub-
stantial measures to improve con-
ditions at the center.
The task force, headed by University
School of Education Dean Wilbur
Cohen, decided it would request
representatives from the Attorney
General's office and the Civil Service
Commission (CSC) to assist in the in-
vestigation.
COHEN SAID HE wanted the Attor-
ney General's office to adivise the task

force on the legal aspects of the
Plymouth case.
"We want to find out exactly what the
law is," Cohen said. Other task force
members said they would ask for CSC
officials to inform them about rules and
practices surrounding the hiring of
state civil service employees. Letters
have been sent to the Attorney
General's office and the CSC requesting
that they attend next Wednesday's task
force meeting in Lansing. So far no
replies have been received.
Assisting Cohen on the task force in-
clude members of three prominent
state departments: John Dempsey of
the Department of Social Services, Dr.
Vernon Stehman of the Department of
Mental Health and Col. Gerald Hough
of the State Police.
DEMPSEY EMPHASIZED the need
for cooperation among the three state
agencies. 1
"When three people are in charge, no
one is in charge," he said.

r inquir
Completing the task force are
William Haber, a former dean at the
University; Erma Henderson,
president of the Detroit City Council;
and Walter Greene, vice president of
the National Bank of Detroit.
EVELYN PROLVITT, acting direc-
tor of the Plymouth Center, briefed the
task force on recommendations her
staff had prepared in the two weeks
since she replaced former director
William Womack. Womack quit under
severe pressure after the Detroit Free
Press reported his administration had
covered up the abuse problem and
failed to take necessary action to stop
it.
Provitt complained that staff morale
is very low and needs considerable
uplifting. She also claimed a substan-
tial number of attendants often phone
the center, particularly on weekends,
and notify authorities they are too sick
to work that day.
"The number one priority is the need

begins
for training assistance for attendants
and then increasing the staff," said
Provitt.
HER SUGGESTIONS centered
around the basic programs implemen-
ted for patients in the institution. She
said she believes there is "a lack of
programming between 3:00-8:00" at the
center.
"The responsibility of programming
must shift to the afternoon and that is
not happening," she said.
While admitting there is a serious
problem of understaffing at Plymouth,
Provitt said she sees the essential
problem as one of a "lack of atten;
tiveness among the staff."
Supporting her contention, Michigan
Health Council spokesman John Doher-
ty yesterday said patient abuse and
inadequate care problems at the
Plymouth Center and other institutions
are due to a shortage in adequately
trained psychiatric doctors, nurses and
technicians.

City adds 15,000 new voters

By PAULA LASHINSKY
When the April 3 city election rolls
around, the turnout may be higher than
some might expect, at least if results
from recent voter registration efforts
are any indication.
Some 15,000 new voters were added to
the rolls in this year's registration
drive, which ended March 6. City Clerk
Jerome Weiss said that figure is a good
indication that turnout at the election
will be high.
"I THINK IT would be a very bad

omen if the people of Ann Arbor didn't
realize how important their vote is,"
said Sylvester Murray, city ad-
ministrator. "It would greatly surprise
me if this year's turnout is not greater
than last year's.
The Coalition for Better Housing
(CBH), which sponsors the two tenants'
rights referendums appearing on the
ballot, led the most successful campus-
wide drive to register voters and drum
up support for the housing issues. CBH
registered 3,800 people, nearly a quar-
ter of the total of new registrants.
"Generally both political parties

combined sign between 1,000 and 2,000
voters, maybe 2,500 in a good year,"
said Tim Kunin of CBH. He attributes
the tenants' issues as being a major
factor in spurring voter interest.
"IN PAST ELECTIONS we have
found that tenants aren't registered in
Ann Arbor. They want to vote about
issues that concern them but don't
remember to register until it is too
late;" he said.
The special mayor's election is also
expected to attract voters to the polls.
Voters still recall last year's mayor's
race, which was decided by one vote.
Local politicians" say voters this year
Will share the thought that they could
hold the deciding ballot.
Loch Ness covers 24 miles of a
geologic rift cutting across Scotland
called the Great Glen. The lake, up to
975 feet deep, holds more water than
any other in Britain.
In 1859, Edward L. Drake struck oil
while drilling a well at titusville, Pa.,
making it the first modern oil well in
the United States.

El PILGRIMAG~E
To The1HOLY LAND
An illustrated lecture by C. E. Bottum, Jr.
President, Townsend & Bottum, Ann Arbor
SATURDAY, MARCH 18, 1978-8:00 PM
RUDOLF STEINER HOUSE,
1923 Geddes, Ann Arbor, Michigan .
THE PUBLIC IS WELCOME
Sponsored by the Rudolf Steiner Institute of the Great Lakes Area

/I

ELECTRONIC
DESIGN
Having completed most of your academic requirements,
you graduating Seniors are about to make a very important
career decision. John Fluke Company would like to help you
make the right decision. We offer challenging and exciting
Design Careers.
Our physical loction in the Seattle, Washington area, of
the scenic Pacific Northwest, coupled with our Engineering
Design Team excellence offers Seniors graduating with a BSEE
or MSEE outstanding career opportunities. At John Fluke Com-
pony graduating Engineers receive immediate "Hands-on"
Design responsibilities within one of our Design Teams.
A representative of the John Fluke Company will
be on your campus Friday, March 17, 1978. You've invested
a lot of time and effort in developing skills for a career. Spend-
ing a few minutes with a John Fluke Company representative
discussing career opportunity may be the most profitable time
spent in your career selection process.
- Contact your Placement Center to schedule a time to

Interested Students and Faculty Invited. ..
PROFESSIONAL
HEALTH CAREERS
DAY
Tuesday, March 21st-10 A.M.-4 P.M.
2nd Floor, Michigan League
Unique opportunity to visit with faculty and staff from over 25 different profes-
sional health programs. . .. Includes fields such as Cytotechnology, Physician's
Asst., Public Health, Respiratory Therapy, etc.... Information on Admissions,
Curriculum, Career Opportunities, etc.
SPONSORED BY THE PRE-PROFESSIONALOFFICE
This Summer

Earn College Credft in
New York City

i

at
esign
This summer come to New York and
learn, at a school famous in the art Courses of
world, as well as in a city world famous
as a cultural and art center. Photography

study include:

interview with our representative.
John Fluke Company
P.O. Box 43210, 7001 220th SW
Ama...omn.fla Tarrua._ Waehinntan R043

Parsons School of Design is pleased to
announce a series of new courses de-
signed for College students who wish to
supplement their art studies. These
courses are taught by some of New
York's most distinguished professionals
and run from July 5th thru July 28th,
Monday thru Thursday. They allow
students"ample time to see how theory is
put to practical application inthe great
arts capital of New York. Each course
carries 4 credits.

Paint ing
Graphic Design
Interior Design
Interior Design and
Environmental Analysis
Assemblage, Plaster Casting
and Woodcarving
Lithography

Out-of-townstudents can find dorm
space nearby, where single and double
(air-conditioned) rooms are available.

For more information on courses. registration and accommodations mail the

i

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