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March 17, 1978 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-03-17

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Page 6-Friday, March 17, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Regents
(Continued from Page 1)
The report approved by the Regents
also gives them power to appoint an ad-
visory committee of faculty represen-
tatives, students, administrators, and
alumni to gather information about any
issue that "involves serious moral or
ethical (investment) questions which
are of concern to many members of the
University community." There is no
indication of the process of selection for
the,advisory committee members.

vote to
University President Robben
Fleming at the start of the meeting told.
the group that the Regents had asked
him to respond to charges of conflict of
interest that have been levelled at the
public officials.
"NO REGENT has any conflict of in-
terest as defined by the laws of the state
of Michigan," Fleming said. "No
Regent is a director or an officer of a
corporation whose stock is involved in
this matter (South Africa)," he con-
tinued.
All 18 members of the University
community who addressed the Regents
for ten minutes each advocated the
University take immediate steps to sell
all of its $80.5 million worth of stocks
and bonds involved in South Africa
because- of the system of racial
discrimination in that country-apar-
theid.
"The University of Michigan is an
educational institution that teaches
both in the classroom and through its
investment policy," said Anne Marie
Coleman, a campus minister and co-
director of Guild House. Coleman said
that since "apartheid is the worst of
human culture" a decision other than

keep Soi
total divestment would 'deny what the
University teaches in the classroom."
GEOGRAPHY PROF. Thomas Det-
wyler asked, "How might divestiture
affect the flow of monetary gifts to the
University?" He said of the 326
benefactors who have each given the
University at least $10010 over the last
decade, the University holds stocks and
bonds in 29 of them. Divestiture might
be seen "perhaps as a slap on the hand
reaching out for gifts," Detwyler said.
Several speakers drew parallels bet-
ween the apartheid regime of South
African President John Vorster and the
discrimination of the past against
American blacks and also with the
racist policy of Nazi Germany.
"There is a neo-Nazi regime in South
Africa today," said William Hawkins, a
graduate student in Mathematics. "If
the Regents decide not to divest, they
will look back on that decision with a
great deal of shame."
SEVERAL speakers emphasized the
leadership role of the University. "The
name of the University of Michigan
goes before you and echoes around the
world," said Leonard Suransky, a

uth African
South African. graduate student in
Education. "Always the term education. '
is linked to morality . . . we are not x
going to change South African policy by :
politicking with our stocks." h .
Regent Roach replied that change,
could be initiated by American institu-
tins. If U.S. corporations were forced to <x : :
put out "someone else would buy the
stock. It means that it would be sold. To
whom? To the Dutch? To the Germans?
To the British? To the South African
Government?" asked Roach rhetori-
cally.
MANY OF THE speakers expressed
skepticism about the value of adopting
the Sullivan principles. "The so-called
Sullivan principles have -been actively
endorsed by the racist government of
South Africa," said graduate student
Maceo Powell.
Dennis Ondeje, from the African
Student Association said, "Nobody in
South Africa is struggling or laying
down their lives for the Sullivan prin-
ciples."

investments

Monday, March 20, at 8 PM in Power Center, the Nikolais
Dance Theatre will present a slide demonstration, free and open
to the public, through the support of National Endowment for
the Arts and Mi'chigan Council for the Arts. Tickets for per-
formances March 21 and 22 are limited, Check for availability
at:
WWIVEITY WUSICAL. 9.CIETY
BURTON TOWER, Weekdays 9-4:30, Sat. 9-12. 665-3717

Track meet: Adults only, please

By PAULINE TOOLE
They're coming - running, jumping,
and walking. It's not an interplanetary
invasion, just a deluge of sweatsuited,
"adult" athletes who will soon overrun
Ann Arbor when the first Michigan
Masters Indoor Track and Field Cham-
pionship opens Saturday at the Track
and Tennis Building.
The meet is jointly sponsored by the1
Ann Arbor Track Club and the Gandy
Dancer restaurant. According to club.
member Christy Summerfield,

"There's no other indoor meet for the
masters, except one in New york.
ORGANIZERS HOPE to channel the
interests of numerous runners, ages 25
and up, who traditionally have been ex-
cluded from participating in track
meets. The meet, separated by sex and
age divisions, allows women 25 and
older and men 30 and older to par-
ticipate. Summerfield anticipated over
200 people from around the country
would register for the meet.
The Ann Arbor Track Club, a non-

Hey!

UAC needs

new Program Directors

profit organization trying to make run-
ning more accessible to the community,
also sponsors an Ann Arbor to Dexter
marathon each spring. The idea for the
masters meet surfaced in the early fall
and lay dormant until early this year
when Gandy Dancer owner Chuck Muir
offered sponsorship.
"People were a little skeptical at first
because marathons are big things, and
masters meets aren't," Summerfield
explained. "People are getting excited
now," she said.
The track club has prepared a booklet -
on how to watch' a track meet which
details the events: long jump, high
jump, two-mile walk, and explains the
intricacies of each event.}
N U$
"It's still
old story,
a fight for
love and
glory."
Paramount Pictures presents
661)LAY IT AIAINS,
TONIGHT
at 7, 8:40 & 10:20 PM
100 Hutchins Hall (Law Quod)
$1.25 GARGOYLE FILMS

s:
a4
w.

Deadline for applications is March 24. Apply at UAC. 2nd Floor of
Michigan Union. Telephone 763-1107

The University Activities Center
UAC) is the largest student run
organization on campus. We pro
vide U-M students with hundreds of
cultural programs and entertaining
events each year. Responsible. cre-
ative people are needed for the
1978 79 school year to manage
UAC programs:
FILM Eclipse Jazz
MUSICALS Mediatrics
LECTURES Viewpoint Lectures
TICKETS Musket
CONCERTS Ticket Central
DANCES Special Events
HOMECOMING Soph Show
Union Progromming
Dorm Programming

i

Ut-

I ~

--om m CLIP AND SAVE -- - ---I
- IEtT ROIP10 L11
. M LB ROOM 1 Admission to all films i1.50

I II i

.

U

r'

METROPOLIS FILM SOCIETY
M ar 17 THE HARDERPĀ°I-
THEY COME
The Jamacian Film classic. Jimmy Cliff stars in this
extraordinary film about the Jamacian society
in which Reggae music defines the lives and fantasies
of the people. A film of rebellion, egnviction and
liberation. "The Harder They Come has more
guts, wit, humor and sheer exhuberance than
most movies you'll see in any year of movie
going." - Vincent Canby
New York Times
Showtimes: 7:30 9:30

[ i.

I
f

r

I

f ,

Mar 24 MARATHON MAN
Director John Schlesinger, acc aimed for his
sensitivity with films like Midnight Cowboy,
exhibits a dazzling mastery of the traditional
thriller conventions in Marathon Man. Dustin
Hoffman is Babe, a graduate student and long-
distance runner unwittingly involved in
international intrigue, who is pitted against the
quintessential villain of all time, a sadistic,
egotistical Nazi dentist who prefers to work
without anesthetics. The result is a chilling
nightmare that leaves audiences gasping. e
Showtimes: 7:30 9:45
Mar 31 FREAKS
Tod Browning's Horror Classic. "The freaks
revenge takes on the force of old and forgotten
rituals ... the heights of terror reached in this
film have their parallel only in Poe's Hop Frog.
Grisly, but compassionate film was banned in
Britain for 30 years and many exhibitors in the
United States refused to play it."
-Georges Sadoul
Dictionary of Films

Ii lb'

Ina
1-
its
-I
li
lS

PRESENTS
SA%]TUILILIAY MrI8
Mar 18 THE TENANT
Internationally-acclaimed director Roman ,
Polanski (Chinatown, Rosemary's Baby) leads
his audience on a journey through the distorted I
realm of a human mind. As in his classic
Repulsion, the theme here is obsessive paranoia.
However, this time Polanski observes his paranoid
"victim" through a slyly wicked sense of humor.
Polanski himself plays Trelkovsky, a nebbish
file clerk with a loose grip on himself and.,
the need for an apartment. Paranoia strikes
deep and Polanski twists the knife with an
accommodating smile Showtimes: 7:30 9:45
Mar 25 MARATHON MAN
Director John Schlesinger, acclaimed for his
sensitivity with films like Midnight Cowboy,
exhibits a dazzling mastery of the traditional
thriller conventions in Marathon Man. Dustin
Hoffman is Babe, a graduate student and long-
distance runner unwittingly involved in I
international intrigue, who is pitted against the
quintessential villain of all time, a sadistic,
egotistical Nazi dentist who prefers to work ,
without anesthetics. The result is a chilling
nightmare that leaves audiences gasping.
Showtimes: 7: 30 9: 45
Apr 1 CITIZEN'S BAND *
(Handle With Care)
The surprise hit of the New York Film
Festival, director Jonathan Demme's Citizen's
Band is a brilliant, hilarious exploration of
a group of people in a small California town,
addicted to their C.B. r'adios. Conservative
and repressed, when they use their C.B."s
their fantasy life becomes real. C.B. personna
and their real life existence intermix in a
convoluted, provocative statement on
America, our dreams and fantasies.
Showtimes 7:00 8:45 10:30
Apr 8 TARGETS
The ambitious and successful directorial debut of
Peter Bogdanovich gathers several diverse story
threads to create a gripping thriller. Both a
nostalgic tribute to the greatest horror film
actor of them all, Boris Karloff, and a clinical
study of the psychology of a mass murderer, this
intriguing work weaves together two stories: one
about a young married man who goes berserk
and takes position as a sniper; the other about an
aging Hollywood horror film star (Karloff). The
cimax, which takes place at a drive-in movie with
the sniper behind the screen, is one of the most
devastating comments on senseless violence
ever made. Showtimes: 7:00 8:45 10:30
Apr 15 THE CONFESSION

Showtimes: 7:00 8:15 9:30 10:45

Apr 7

CRIES and WHISPERS

Ingrnt Bergmian isthe great nit stof the human psyche,
who through 18 fims has portrayed human expression
and constiiusness with o tronscendont misight
Cries and Whispers is one of his greatest films
It deals with the relatenship between three',isters
one of whom is dying The lim deals hrliantly
with the terror of the hruimn oniiten, its
fears, dreams and fantasies kv Ullman giJes o
stunning performonc-e
Showtimes: 7 00 8:45. 10 30

A

Apr 14 ROCKY HORROR
PICTURE SHOW

1146

ob

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