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January 11, 1978 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-01-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

POe 10-Wednesday,,January 11, 1978-The Michigan Daily
(Continued from Page 1)
* CHARLENE Eisenlohr, a counsel-
or at Huron, said the one-year hike is
k enough.
"One year doesn't seem like a big
f difference," she said, "but it's such a
crucial time. Most of our seniors are
"D ritnkin ,ihen n ha ae t(iur
accessible to the younger students,
too Bythe time they're nineteen,
they're gone."
A recent Huronsgraduate who just
turned eighteen said the age hike
wouldn't curtail teen liquor pur-
chases much.
"A lot of places around here don't
check I.D.," she said. "We always go
to the stores that don't."
REPRESENTATIVE Perry Bul-
lard (D-Ann Arbor) who heads the

"Everything to do with alcohol is a
problem," Bullard said. "I don't
think dabbling with the drinking age
is the solution." Bullard said he
'doesn't think the lowering of the
drinking age has hurt the high
schools. Liquor among teenagers, he
said, "has always been a problem.
Students have always been able to
get it from their, older brothers and
sisters."
Bullard advocates increased fam-
ily concern and "reasonable and
restrained drinking" as a solution to
the problem. "It will be more a result
of social and cultural change than of
a law change."
RICHARD DOUGLASS and Jay
Freedman, researchers for the Uni-
versity's Highway Safety Research
Institute, have found that since the
drinking age was lowered in 1972,
Michigan 18- to 20-year-olds have
been involved in at least 4,600

alcohol-related automobile crashes,
of which 89 resulted in at least one
fatality. Douglassand Freedman say
those numbers represent over a 16
per cent increase in 18- to 20-year-
olds' accidents from 1968-71.
According to Douglass, "Alcohol-
related accidents are the leading
cause of death" for people in the 18-20
age group. The two researchers
recommended that the drinking age
be raised, although to what age they
did not specify.
Other state agencies have pro-
posed various other solutions. The
State Safety Commission rejected
the idea of raising the drinking age,
saying it would not solve the accident
problem. The Commission favored
an extension of the present one-year
probationary period for a driver's
license to four years, thus enabling
the state to be stricter, with 18-year-
olds who drive under the influence of

alcohol.
OTHER PROPOSED solutions in-
clude:
-Special alcohol intervention edu-
cation programs for young drinking
drivers;
-Studies of thedrinking-and-driv-
ing habits of young drivers;
-Booklets on automobiles and
alcohol to be distributed along with
license information at Department of
State offices.
Others see a dollars-and-cents
problem in the drinking age contro-
versy. According to Jim Grabow,
manager of Dooley's, at least half the
bar's patrons are eighteen. About the
bill, Grabow admits he's "kind of
biased. It's going to affect business
for sure"

House committee which is conduct-
ing hearings on the matter, is "fairly
certain" he will vote against the bills
if they come to the House floor.

MBA

BUSINESS PLANNING

FINANCE

MARKETING

January 18,1978
a representative of CHAMPION INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION will be interviewing graduating students for positions which can
develop into exciting careers in one of America's most far sighted and rewarding industries, Forest Products.
Champion International Corporation is a major forest products company, a pioneer in the building materials, paper and paper
packaging businesses. With nearly 50,000 employees the company's 1977 sales were approximately $3. 6 billion.
There are more than 400 Champion.International facilities in the United States and Canada and it is reasonably certain you have
had an association with one or more of our products in the paper, paper packaging or building materials areas.

Israel to
add three
West Bank
villagyes
af
(Continued from Page 1)
ments, claims the plan, for new
outposts is unwise on the eve of nego-
tiations. The DMC, using a right it
won before joining the Begin govern-
ment, demanded the review by the
parliament committee, which voted
to approve the new settlements.
Jewish settlement is only one of the
issues barring the way to Middle
East peace. Some of the others which
Egyptian and Israeli negotiators will
discuss are:
" Israeli withdrawal from Sinai.
Israel wants to phase its pullout over
three' to five years and leave a
security force to guard its settle-
ments. Sadat wants a speedier
withdrawal, with all Israeli settle'-
ment and soldiers out.
"* The West Bank and the Gaza
Strip. Sadat wants Israel to make a
statement of principle that it is
willing to give self-determination to
the region's 1.1 million Palestinian
Arabs, leading to an independent
state. Israel is offering the Palestin-
ians limited self-rule, with a contin-
ued Israeli military presence in the
region. Sovereignty would be deter
mined at a later date.
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM r
HEANMENELSSOHN
'4 THEATRE
Sun., Jan. 15 2pm &8pm
Tickets available at PTP~ Ticket Office
Michigan League, Mon-Fri 10-1 ,25
ForT nformation Cal: s764-040
Tickets also available through Hudson's 'stores.

I

Our building materials business, domestically represented by
Champion Building Products, is in itself a large business: 1977
sales of $1. 1 billion. This unit of our company is an important
producerandmarketerof plywood, lumber, hardboard and particle-
board. These products are used in both industrial and construction
markets and for furniture and home improvement projects. Our
building materials might well be used as sheathing, studs or siding
in your home, as underlayrment for your floors, shelving or panel-
ing in your family room.'
And it's hard to get too far from our Champion Papers products,
too. This division of Champion International had sales of over
$1 billion in 1977. Champion Papers is a major producer of writ-
ing, printing and business papers, the second largest manufac-
turer of milk cartons, a producer last year of more than 51/2

billion envelopes and the country's largest wholesaler of office
products.
Our paper packaging business is represented by Hoerner
Waldorf, a large (over $500 million last year) producer of cor-
rugated containers, consumer packages. gtocery, multi-wall and
shopping bags. We package boats, refrigerators, toys, taco shells,
detergents. cereals, groceries, dishes, pet food and thousands of
other items.
Behind all the products we make is the tree. We have 3.4 million
acres of forestlands in the United States. Champion Timberlands
is a separate division responsible for intensively managing these
lands to assure a continuing supply of timber, and for supplying
our current needs for paper, paper packaging and build-
ing materials.

We at Champion International would like to tell you more about our company, and the opportunities that exist for exciting and
rewarding careers. If you would like to know more about' us, please sign the interview list at the placement office and meet with
our representative on January 18, 1978
ji Champion International Corporation
1 Landmark Square, Stamford, Connecticut 06921
Champion International takes affirmative action towards equal employment opportunity

V

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COME TO A FREE

EVELYN WOOD

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times faster, with comparable comprehension. We will guarantee that in
just three days you will triple your reading ability (speed times
comprehension).
Standard Rate $375
NOW- Student Discount $175

SCHEDULE OF FREE MNI-LESSONS

JANUARY 9th-14th

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Michigan Union-Kuenzel Room
SCHEDULE OF FREE MINI-LESSONS
Or CnI ColIect for MoreInfonrmntinn

MR-A-PBD R-E-ATDIL-N-
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